Second Express Entry Draw sees 10 points drop

Second Express Entry draw in less than two weeks sees 10-point drop in cut-off score

Second Express Entry draw in less than two weeks sees 10-point drop in cut-off score

Second Express Entry draw in less than two weeks sees 10-point drop in cut-off score

Second Express Entry draw in less than two weeks sees 10-point drop in cut-off score

3,000 candidates with a minimum score of 446 invited in latest invitation round

The Government of Canada has invited 3,000 Express Entry candidates to apply for Canadian permanent residence in a draw that took place Monday, March 26. The cut-off Comprehensive Ranking System score was 446.

Today’s score is 10 points lower than the previous draw, which took place on March 14. This is first time in 2018 that back-to-back draws have taken place in less than two weeks, and is also a rare Monday morning draw. Recently, Express Entry draws have for the most part taken place on Wednesdays.

The size of this invitation round, 3,000 continues the trend seen through the last three draws, all of which also issued Invitations to Apply, or ITAs, to 3,000 Express Entry candidates.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) once again employed its tie-break rule in this latest draw. In this case, the time and date of the tie-break was February 23, 2018 at 08:06:19 UTC. This means that all candidates with a CRS score above 446, as well as those candidates with scores of 446 who entered their profile in the Express Entry pool before this time, received an ITA.

This latest draw was the sixth of 2018, which is the first year of the Canadian government’s new multi-year immigration levels plan. For 2018, Canada has increased its target to 74,900 admissions through the three economic immigration classes administered through the Express Entry system — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, the Federal Skilled Trades Class and the Canadian Experience Class.

In 2017, IRCC had an admissions target of 71,700 and finished the year having issued a total of 86,023 ITAs.

It remains to be seen if this rare Monday morning draw less than two weeks after the previous Express Entry draw is an indication of how IRCC will conduct future draws. Last year, April proved to be one of the Express Entry system’s busiest months with three draws and a total of 11,341 ITAs issued. Last April also saw the CRS minimum cut-off score drop to 415.

“A draw less than two weeks after the last one, and a drop of 10 points in the CRS cut-off score is a great way to finish March,” said Attorney David Cohen, senior partner with the Campbell, Cohen immigration law firm in Montreal. “Last April and May were exciting months for the Express Entry system, with multiple draws that ultimately brought the CRS cut-off to its all-time low of 413. We’re looking forward to seeing what’s in store for Express Entry this spring.”

Posted in Canada, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Immigration level in the fourth quarter of 2017 was second highest since 1991

Immigration level in the fourth quarter of 2017 was second highest since 1991

International migration accounted for 70% of Canadian population growth in last three months of 2017

International migration accounted for 70% of Canadian population growth in last three months of 2017

Immigration level in the fourth quarter of 2017 was second highest since 1991

International migration accounted for 70% of Canadian population growth in last three months of 2017

International migration continued to drive Canadian population growth in the final quarter of 2017, accounting for nearly 70% of the increase seen during that three-month period, new Statistics Canada data reveal.

The federal agency said international migration, which includes immigration, return emigration and net non-permanent residents, “remained the main driver of population growth” between October 1, 2017, and January 1, 2018.

During that period, Canada’s population increased by 78,805 people, or 0.2 percent. Of that number, nearly 70 percent (55,048) was attributed to what Statistics Canada calls “international migratory increase.”

The agency described this level of increase as “uncommonly high” for the fourth quarter.

“Such strong growth has rarely been seen during a fourth quarter since the beginning of the period covered by the current demographic accounting system [in place since July 1971],” Statistics Canada said.

Immigration accounted for a gain of 65,539 people in the last three months of 2017, the second highest level in a fourth quarter since 1991.

Canada also gained 2,087 non-permanent residents in this time period, many of them refugee claimants.

Net emigration accounted for a loss of 12,578 people. This number is subtracted from the combined totals of immigration, return emigration and net non-permanent residents to obtain the international migratory increase.

International migration drives population increases in provinces, Yukon

International migratory increase was also the main driver of population growth in the Yukon Territory and nearly every Canadian province that posted a population increase in the fourth quarter of 2017.

“Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and Yukon have rarely posted such strong international migration growth in the fourth quarter,” the study notes.

International migration also helped offset some of the interprovincial migration losses in Prince Edward Island and the negative natural increase (more deaths than births) in New Brunswick.

Non-permanent residents also played a role in increases noted in Quebec, Manitoba and British Columbia. Quebec recorded an increase of 3,078 non-permanent residents during a period when it normally sees a decline.

Posted in British Columbia, Canada, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Zealand offers a range of visa options for partners and children.

New Zealand offers a range of visa options for partners and children.

New Zealand offers a range of visa options for partners and children.

New Zealand offers a range of visa options for partners and children.

Visas for partners & children

If you are applying for a New Zealand visa based on your relationship, you and your partner will need to meet certain criteria.

  • Your partnership needs to be genuine and stable.
  • You must be living with your partner.
  • You must meet health and character requirements.
  • You must have the support of your partner.
  • Your partner must be eligible to support your application.

Check the specific requirements for your situation as they vary for temporary and resident visas.

If you are an Australian citizen or permanent resident, you also may be able to sponsor a partner’s visa. However, you will need to prove that New Zealand is your primary place of residence before you can support the application.

You should also consider all visa options for coming to New Zealand, as some are eligible for more services than others.

Temporary visas

You can apply for a temporary work or visitor visa to be with your partner in New Zealand if you both meet the criteria.

If your application is dependent on your partner’s temporary visa, your visa will only be valid for the same time period as theirs.

If your partner is a New Zealand citizen or resident you can apply for a work or visitor visa of between 12- 24 months duration, depending on the length of the relationship.

Resident visas

You can be included as a secondary applicant in your partner’s application under most resident visa categories, including under the Skilled Migrant Category or Residence from Work. There may be an English language requirement for these applications.

You can also apply for a resident visa if you are in a relationship with a New Zealand citizen or resident, under the Family Partnership category.

Children

Your dependent children can apply to join you in New Zealand. The Immigration New Zealand website defines when a child is considered dependent.

Temporary visa

Your dependent children can apply for student or visitor visas to be with you in New Zealand.

School-aged dependent children need a student visa to be able to attend primary, intermediate or secondary schools, and do not pay international fees unless they are in tertiary study. Children younger than school age can apply for a visitor visa. A student visa is not needed to attend pre-school in New Zealand.

Resident visa

Your dependent children can be included as secondary applicants in your residence application.

If you’re already a New Zealand citizen or resident, your children can apply under the dependent child category. If they’re over 16, they may need to meet English language requirements.

Posted in Business / Investor Visa, Dependent Visa, Immigration, New Zealand, Study Abroad, Tourist Visa, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment