Will an Essential Skills work visa help if I want to apply for a resident visa?

Will an Essential Skills work visa help if I want to apply for a resident visa?

Will an Essential Skills work visa help if I want to apply for a resident visa?

New Zealand offers a range of work visas. All are temporary, though some can lead to the residence.

Essential Skills work visas

These visas are meant for temporary stays. The duration and conditions of the visa depend on the term of your job offer, your salary and labour market conditions.

Is your job on a skill shortage list?

The Essential Skills in Demand Lists are Immigration New Zealand’s occupational skill shortage lists.

If you have a job offer in an occupation on one of the lists and your qualifications and experience match, you can apply for an Essential Skills work visa.

Your employer won’t need to provide evidence of attempting to recruit New Zealanders because Immigration New Zealand (INZ) reviews the lists regularly and has concluded that employers are unable to find enough people with these skills, qualifications, and experience in New Zealand.

What if the job is not on a skill shortage list?

Employers who have advertised the job in New Zealand and made genuine but unsuccessful efforts to find a suitable New Zealand citizen or resident for the position can look to recruit migrant workers. In this situation, you can apply for an Essential Skills work visa, and your employer will need to provide supporting information to demonstrate their efforts to recruit New Zealanders first.

Will an Essential Skills work visa help if I want to apply for a resident visa?

Essential Skills work visas are intended to fill temporary skill gaps, so they do not lead directly to a residence application.

However, if you have an Essential Skills work visa based on a skilled job, you may gain enough points to qualify for residence visa under the Skilled Migrant Category.

Work to Residence visas

There are two main types of Work to Residence visa which enable you to work in New Zealand and then, after working in the job for at least 24 months, apply for a resident visa.

Work to Residence: Long Term Skill Shortage

If you have a permanent or long-term job offer in an occupation on the Long Term Skill Shortage List and your qualifications and experience match, you could apply for a Work to Residence Visa. You’ll need to meet the age, health and character requirements.

Work to Residence: Accredited Employer

If you have a long-term or permanent job offer from an Immigration New Zealand accredited employer you could apply for work to residence visa. You’ll need to meet the age, health and character requirements, and your job offer will need to meet certain requirements.

Bringing your partner & children

There is a range of visa options so your family can join you in New Zealand. Explore their options here.

Other visa options

There are a number of New Zealand visas not mentioned on this page. You can view information on this site about other types of visas or alternatively, visit the Immigration New Zealand website for a definitive list of all visas.

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Canada will reopen Parents and Grandparents program next Monday

Canada’s Parents and Grandparents Program: Are you ready?

Canada will reopen Parents and Grandparents program next Monday

Canada will reopen Parents and Grandparents program next Monday

Canada will reopen its Parents and Grandparents sponsorship program next Monday to expressions of interest and invitations to apply to the program will be issued on a first-in, first-served basis.

This means the quicker you can get your complete Interest to Sponsor form submitted, the better your chances may be of getting an invitation to apply to sponsor your parents and grandparents for permanent residence in Canada through the Parents and Grandparents Program (PGP).

IRCC says the Interest to Sponsor form should only take about 10 minutes to complete if you have all the necessary information and documents ready to go.

With this in mind, here’s a primer on how the expression of interest process works and the information that’s required so you can hit the ground running when the form goes live.

What? When? Where?

The first step in the sponsorship process is completing an Interest to Sponsor form. This is not an application to the PGP, but instead lets Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) know that you would like to sponsor your parents and grandparents for permanent residence in Canada.

The Interest to Sponsor form will be made available at 12 p.m. Eastern Standard Time next Monday, January 28, on IRCC’s website and will remain available until a set number of completed forms are received.

Invitations to apply to the PGP will then be issued to eligible potential sponsors in the order Interest to Sponsor forms were received until IRCC’s 2019 cap of 20,000 complete applications is met.

Who is eligible?

Anyone who is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada and who is over the age of 18 can sponsor their parents and grandparents.

All interested sponsors will have to confirm that they have the required income for the number of family members they’ll be supporting financially.

What constitutes a complete Interest to Sponsor form?

A complete Interest to Sponsor form requires the following information:

  1. The interested sponsor’s family name and given name(s) exactly as it is written on the proof of status in Canada document they will have to submit along with the Interest to Sponsor form.
  2. Interested sponsor’s date of birth.
  3. The country or territory where the interested sponsor was born.
  4. The interested sponsor’s primary residential address (where they live)
    1. The interested sponsor must live in Canada.
    2. All fields must be completed and the complete address provided.
    3. Street number, street name, apartment or unit number (if applicable) must be provided along with P.O. Box (if applicable), province or territory, and postal code.
    4. For the street number and address, including the street type (street, boulevard, avenue, etc.). IRCC provides the following format as an example: 123 John St. or 123 John Ave. or 123 John Pl.
  5. The interested sponsor’s email address.
  6. The number of family members in the interested sponsor’s family unit.
  7. The total number of persons to be sponsored, including their dependents (spouse, partner and children)
  8. Names of the parents and grandparents who would be sponsored.
  9. Date of birth of the parents and grandparents who would be sponsored.
  10. The interested sponsor’s proof of status in Canada document number.
  11. The interested sponsor’s electronic signature (they must type in their name).

You cannot adjust your information once the Interest to Sponsor form has been submitted.

If IRCC invites you to apply, you can provide your updated information in your application. You will need to provide a letter explaining any changes along with proof of the changes.

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Where are Australia’s new citizens coming from?

Where are Australia’s new citizens coming from?

Where are Australia's new citizens coming from?

Where are Australia’s new citizens coming from?

India has emerged as the top source of Australian citizenship, overtaking the United Kingdom, with over 118,000 Indian-born migrants pledging allegiance to Australia since 2013-14.

Indian migrants have emerged as the top source of citizenship by conferral in Australia during the last five years, overtaking the United Kingdom.

During the five years between 2013-14 and 2016-17, over 118,000 people born in India have pledged their allegiance to Australia by becoming Australian citizens.

Indian-born applicants also top the list of visa recipients by country under Australia’s annual permanent immigration program.

Former Citizenship minister Alan Tudge revealed the country-wise breakup of the citizenship statistics in the federal parliament earlier this year.

Of the 54,419 citizenship applications approved as of 28th February 2018, Indian migrants formed the biggest cohort with 10,168 applications of the Indian-born migrants having been approved.

  1. 10,168 – India
  2. 9,195   – United Kingdom
  3. 2,617   – South Africa
  4. 2,399   – Philippines.
  5. 1,996   – Australia
  6. 1,962   – Sri Lanka
  7. 1,731   – Republic of Ireland
  8. 1,559   – Peoples Republic of China
  9. 1,200   – South Korea
  10. 1,193   – Malaysia
  11. 20,399 – Other countries

In the year 2016-17, over 22,000 Indians pledged their allegiance to Australia, while 19,617 people from the UK became Australian citizens.

Indian-born migrants have been at the top of the citizenship ladder since 2013-14 when 26,040 Indian-born migrants were granted Australian citizenship. UK-born migrants have been at the second position, closely behind India.

Australian Citizenship conferrals lowest in 15 years

However, the number of Australian citizenship conferrals have plunged a 15-year low in 2017-18 with under 81,000 migrants receiving the Australian citizenship by conferral – the lowest since 2002-03.

There are also concerns about a mounting backlog of citizenship applications awaiting approval and ballooning waiting times.

According to the Department of Home Affairs, nearly 245,000 applications were awaiting processing at the end of June this year and the global processing time for citizenship by conferral is now between 17 and 19 months.

The Department attributes the delay in processing to an enhanced focus on “integrity and community safety”, an increase in demand for Australian citizenship and an increase in the number of cases requiring “complex identity assessment”.

However, the Department said it’s taking measure to manage the increased volume of applications and processing times and anticipates a higher number of citizenship applications being processed during the current financial year.

“The Government has established a 50-person task force within the Department of Home Affairs to deal with highly complex citizenship applications and ensure they are dealt with as efficiently as possible,” Minister for Immigration and Citizenship, David Coleman said.

“An additional 150 staff are also being allocated to focus solely on the processing of applications, with all additional staff expected to be in the role by the end of the year,” Mr. Coleman added.

He said these measures have already shown results with improves processing of applications during the first three months of this financial year.

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