Express Entry what are my Chances?

EXPRESS ENTRY: WHAT ARE MY CHANCES?

Express Entry what are my Chances?

Express Entry what are my Chances?

Canada’s Express Entry immigration system can be confusing. Express Entry uses a complicated points-based ranking system to select the most competitive candidates to become Canadian permanent residents. Most people interested in Express Entry want to know: “What are my chances?” Today, we’re going to explain the Express Entry system and take you through a couple of examples to showcase the different possibilities for Express Entry immigration.

WHAT IS EXPRESS ENTRY?

Express Entry is Canada’s federal system for managing economic immigration applications. Express Entry includes three major programs: Federal Skilled Worker (FSW), Canadian Experience Class (CEC) and Federal Skilled Trades (FST).

All three programs require interested candidates to create an Express Entry profile, where they list their personal information and their qualifications for immigration. This profile is considered an Expression of Interest (EOI) but is not an official application for immigration. Based on their profile, every candidate is assigned a score out of 1200 points; this is called a Comprehensive Ranking System Score or CRS Score. Approximately every two weeks, the Canadian government conducts an Express Entry draw where they select the profiles with the highest score and they issue official Invitations to Apply (ITAs) for Canadian permanent residence.

WHAT ARE MY CHANCES OF SUCCESS WITH EXPRESS ENTRY?

When people ask: “What are my chances with Express Entry?” What they usually mean is: “How high will my CRS score be?” and, “Is this high enough to receive an Invitation to Apply?”

While we can never accurately predict the CRS score required to receive an ITA, in the last year the minimum CRS score required to receive an ITA has dropped as low as 413 points, so this is a good target for new profiles.

The CRS score is complex. There are a number of different factors considered in calculating the score, including age, level of education, English and French language proficiency, work experience, and connections to Canada (education, work experience, siblings, etc.). As well, certain provinces or territories may nominate select Express Entry candidates for immigration to their province. This is called a Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) and scores an Express Entry candidate an additional 600 points for their profile!

EXAMPLES – CRS SCORE IN ACTION!

To better explain the CRS score and what someone’s chances might be in Express Entry, we thought it might be useful to look at a few hypothetical situations. Below are three examples of Express Entry candidates. We will walk you through their projected CRS score and present their best options for Canadian immigration.

Please note: the following examples use applicants who are applying without a spouse or common-law partner. Including your partner on your profile does have some minor effects on your CRS score. To learn more, take a look at our article discussing whether or not you’ll gain extra CRS points if you include your spouse!

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