Conflicting Message from Britain-Indian Students

Conflicting Message from Britain-Indian Students Welcome but Not Considered Low-Risk

Conflicting Message from Britain-Indian Students

Conflicting Message from Britain-Indian Students

The UK government has not included India in a new list of countries considered “low risk”, which facilitates an easier visa application process to the country’s universities. This decision has resulted in a severe backlash from Indian students who will now be subjected to intense scrutiny during their student visa application.

What happened?

India is among the top three countries from where overseas students come to study at UK universities. India ranks just after China and US, according to latest Office of National Statistics (ONS) data. The UK Home Office announced a relaxation of the Tier 4 visa category for overseas students from around 25 countries.

The list already covers countries like the US, Canada, and New Zealand, added names of China, Bahrain, and Serbia as countries from where if students would have to go through reduced scrutiny for education, financial and English language skill requirements to study at British universities. The changes will come into effect on July 6. These new changes aim at making the life of an international student hassle-free in the UK.

Sanam Arora, Founder, and chairperson, National Indian Students, and Alumni Union UK while talking to The Logical Indian said “It is important to note that the decision to not include India in the low-risk category does not impact the current application process for Indian students, i.e. they are no worse off in physical terms. However, the message that is going out through this is hugely negative.”

She further added “This is not the first time Indian students have negatively suffered as a result of flawed immigration policymaking – we have had the huge bogus college incident, the ETS TOEIC scandal and of course the removal of the post-study work visa; all of which have perhaps most severely impacted Indian students given the huge volumes that used to come to UK to study.”

“The message of “you’re not welcome” is what students will walk away with rather than the actual message that more or less everyone in the UK is agreed on – which is one of genuinely welcoming Indian students to the UK.” she mentions.

90% of Indian students get a visa approved

Last week, Indian High Commissioner to the UK, Y K Sinha, held a meeting with Sam Gyimah, UK’s minister for universities, and discussed plans for better and smoother student and faculty mobility between the two countries.

As per reports when asked why India had been omitted from this expanded list, The UK Home Office spokesperson said, “We welcome Indian students who want to come to the UK to study at our world-leading educational institutions. We issue more visas to students from India than any other country except China and the USA.”

They stressed on the data that 90 percent of Indian students who apply for a UK visa get approved, which is a rise from 86 percent in 2014 and 83 percent in 2013.

“In addition, the proportion of Indian students coming to study in the UK at a university has increased from around 50 percent in 2010 to around 90 percent in 2016. Indian student visa applications are up 30 percent on last year. We continue to have regular discussions with the Indian government on a range of issues including on visas and UK immigration policy,” the UK Home Office added.

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Immigration drives Canada’s population over 37 million mark

Immigration drives Canada’s population over 37 million mark

Immigration drives Canada’s population over 37 million mark

Immigration drives Canada’s population over 37 million mark

Canada’s population increased by 1 million people in record time, Statistics Canada reports

Canada’s population broke the 37 million mark in the first four months of 2018, growing by a million people in record time thanks largely to immigration, Statistics Canada reports.

New preliminary estimates from Statistics Canada put Canada’s population at 37,067,011 on April 1, 2018.

It only took two years and two months for Canada’s population to grow from 36 million to 37 million, which Statistics Canada says is the quickest increase of this size ever observed. The agency said immigration was the main source of Canada’s population growth.

The first four months of 2018 saw Canada set a new international migratory increase record for that time period, with an increase of 88,120. This is calculated by adding immigrants, returning emigrants and net non-permanent residents, then subtracting emigrants and net temporary emigration.

In terms of immigration, Canada welcomed 79,951 newcomers during the first four months of 2018, compared to 72,795 the previous year.

The number of non-permanent residents was 22,283, more than double the number in the first quarter of 2017. Statistics Canada attributed the growth to an increase in work permit holders and refugee claimants in Canada.

Natural population increase reaches historic low

Canada recorded a natural population increase (births minus deaths) of 15,037 people in the first four months of 2018. Statistics Canada said this was a historic low according to the preliminary data, “primarily because Canada has never recorded so many deaths in a single quarter.”

Every Canadian province and territory other than Newfoundland and Labrador posted a population increase in the first four months of 2018.

Ontario, Alberta and Nunavut each surpassed Canada’s population growth rate of 0.3 percent. Nunavut posted a growth rate of 0.7 percent while Ontario and Alberta each had a growth rate of 0.4 percent.

A recent report by the Conference Board of Canada says Canada’s immigration rate will need to increase to one percent of the population by 2030 in order to replicate its population growth rate of recent decades and ensure modest labour force and economic growth.

Last November, Canada’s federal government announced a new multi-year immigration levels plan that will see admissions ramp up to 340,000 across all immigration programs by 2020 — an immigration rate of 0.9 percent.

Canada’s admissions target for 2018 is set at 310,000, or a rate of 0.84 percent.

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The brief information about the Canada Entrepreneur Start-Up Visa Program

The Canada Entrepreneur Start-Up Visa Program

The brief information about the Canada Entrepreneur Start-Up Visa Program

The brief information about the Canada Entrepreneur Start-Up Visa Program

The Start-Up Visa program grants permanent residence to immigrant entrepreneurs while assisting them to become established in Canada.

The program encourages immigrant entrepreneurs to grow their companies in Canada. Successful applicants link with private sector organizations in Canada, where they can receive funding, guidance and expertise in opening and operating their enterprise in Canada.

Eligibility Requirements

The purpose of this program is to recruit innovative foreign national entrepreneurs who will create new jobs and drive economic growth.

In order to be eligible, applicants for a Start-Up Visa must meet the following requirements:

  • Meet minimum language requirements in English or French (CLB 5 in all abilities);
  • Have sufficient funds to settle in Canada;
  • Plan to settle in a province other than the Province of Quebec;
  • Pass Canadian security and medical clearances;
  • Prove your business is supported through a designated organization; and
  • Show your business meets ownership requirements.
  • No more than five foreign nationals may apply for permanent residence as part of the same business venture under the Start-Up Visa Program.

Investment Details

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has designated a number of venture capital funds, angel investor groups, and business incubator organizations to participate in the Start-Up Visa program.

Successful applicants are required to secure a minimum investment for their Canadian start-up. If coming from a designated Canadian venture capital fund, the investment must be at least $200,000. If coming from an angel investor group, it should be at least $75,000.

Applicants do not need to secure any investment from a business incubator. However, applicants must be accepted into a Canadian business incubator program.

Applicants are not required to invest any of their own money. If their Canadian start-up is unsuccessful, individuals granted permanent residence through this program will retain their permanent resident status.

Evidence of Commitment

In order to demonstrate that the applicant has obtained support from either a venture capital fund, angel investor group, or business incubator, the investor organization must submit a completed Commitment Certificate directly to IRCC. This document includes information regarding the agreement between the applicant and the investment organization. Its purpose is to summarize the relevant details of the commitment between the investment organization and the applicant.

In addition, the applicant will receive a letter of support from the investment organization, which the applicant will need to submit with their application for permanent residence. If there are two or more applicants as part of the same business venture, the commitment by the investment organization can be conditional upon one or more “essential persons” receiving their permanent residence. An essential person is someone who has been specifically identified as essential to the business by the investment organization. If for any reason the application of an essential person is refused, the applications of all others included in the Commitment Certificate will also be refused.

If there are two or more applicants as part of the same business venture, the commitment by the investment organization can be conditional upon one or more “essential person(s)” receiving their permanent residence. An essential person is someone who has been specifically identified as essential to the business by the investment organization. If for any reason the application of an essential person is refused, the applications of all others included in the Commitment Certificate will also be refused.

Support from Multiple Organizations

Applicants may receive support from multiple designated organizations, known as syndication. In this instance, all entities involved must be identified. Together, the designated organizations will provide IRCC with a single Commitment Certificate and one Letter of Support will be provided to the applicant(s).

As soon as a designated venture capital firm invests in a business, the minimum total investment amount that must be invested in that business is $200,000, even if a designated angel group also invests in the same business.

If the business receives support from at least one designated angel group, but not designated venture capital groups, then the minimum total investment amount that must be invested in that business is $75,000.

Peer Review Process

In order to protect this pilot program against fraud, a peer review process has been included. It is designed to make sure that the deals made between the investment organizations and foreign national entrepreneurs are legitimate. An immigration officer may ask for a commitment to be independently assessed by a peer review panel. These panels have been established by an industry association that represents the type of investment organization making the commitment. For example, in the case of an angel investor group, the National Angel Capital Organization would be responsible for establishing the peer review panel.

Alternatively, if the group making the commitment is a venture capital fund, Canada’s Venture Capital and Private Equity Association would be responsible. While the peer review can be requested if the immigration officer believes that it would assist them in making a decision, they can also be initiated on a random basis. The assessment made by the peer review panel is not considered binding on the immigration officer. It will only confirm that the investment organization has carried out the proper checks and investigations according to industry standards. It will not provide an opinion on the wisdom or feasibility of the proposal in question.

The Peer review examines the level of due diligence that was performed by the designated organization and:

  • Ensures that the company has been or will be incorporated in Canada;
  • Ensures that business ownership has been verified and satisfies program requirements;
  • Ensures that the designated organization has considered the viability of the proposed business model, assessed the business venture’s management team and verified the ownership of the intellectual property;
  • Makes sure the focus of the business is on a high-growth potential product and/or service; and
  • Validates, for business incubator applicants, acceptance into an incubator program.

As this is a pilot program, it will only process a maximum of 2,750 applications per year. Moreover, the duration of the program is limited to five years. If this pilot program proves successful, the Canadian Government may choose to establish the Start-Up Visa Program permanently before the end of the five-year period.

Posted in Business / Investor Visa, Canada, Canada Open Work Permit, Canada PNP, Immigration, Quebec, Visa and Immigration | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment