Manitoba Invites 349 Skilled Workers to Apply for Provincial Nomination

Manitoba Invites 349 Skilled Workers to Apply for Provincial Nomination

Manitoba Invites 349 Skilled Workers to Apply for Provincial Nomination

Manitoba Invites 349 Skilled Workers to Apply for Provincial Nomination

The territory of Manitoba has welcomed 349 gifted specialists to settle in the area as changeless occupants in a draw that occurred on September 26. These applicants, in addition to their relatives, are currently in a position to apply for a common selection through the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP). With a selection, welcomed people may then apply to the central government for changeless inhabitant status.

The most recent attract conveys to add up to the number of Letters of Advice to Apply (LAAs) in 2017 to 2,942. LAA demonstrations similarly as an encouragement to apply to the program.

The MPNP is a Canadian movement program that enables the area of Manitoba to welcome new workers who can build up themselves and their families in Manitoba, in view of qualification criteria set by the territory.

For gifted laborers, the MPNP works an ‘Outflow of Interest’ (EOI) framework whereby intrigued people present a formal EOI. When this is done, they have relegated focuses add up to in view of their own variables. The most astounding positioned hopefuls are then issued an LAA. Following a fruitful designation, an applicant may then apply to the government for perpetual occupant status.

In the September 26 draw, 300 applicants were issued an LAA under the criteria for the Skilled Workers in Manitoba sub-class. The positioning score of the most reduced positioned welcomed applicant was 602.

The rest of the 49 LAAs were issued to applicants in the Skilled Workers Overseas sub-class who were welcomed straightforwardly by the MPNP under a Strategic Recruitment Initiative. Each of these applicants had at least 721 focuses.

Vital activities include:

  • Recruitment missions. These abroad business/movement fairs include MPNP agents meeting outside gifted specialists and thusly welcoming them to apply after they have made a formal Expression of Interest (EOI) to the MPNP.
  • Exploratory visits. The MPNP may welcome individuals who have embraced a pre-endorsed Exploratory Visit and passed a meeting with a program official.

Competitors qualified for one of the MPNP for Skilled Workers sub-classifications are positioned by a one of a kind focuses framework that honor up to 1,000 focuses to every hopeful.

September 26 MPNP EOI draw for skilled workers

Sub-category Minimum score required to receive LAA Number of LAAs
Skilled Workers in Manitoba 602 300
Skilled Workers Overseas 721 49

MPNP for Skilled Workers

The MPNP for Skilled Workers was established to help employers in Manitoba find foreign talent to complement their existing workforce. The government of Manitoba selects experienced workers who have made an Expression of Interest in immigrating to the province and who have the skills needed across the local labour market, and nominate them to receive a provincial nomination certificate from the MPNP. With this, the nominated person may then apply to the federal government for permanent resident status.

These immigration options may be particularly attractive to individuals who may not be eligible to immigrate to Canada through the federal Express Entry immigration selection system, as the eligibility requirements are different. For example, the MPNP awards points for language proficiency equivalent to Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 4 to candidates in certain occupations, a much lower threshold than what is required under the Federal Skilled Worker Class.

MPNP Skilled Workers in Manitoba

Under this sub-category of the MPNP, applications are accepted from qualified foreign workers and international student graduates who are currently working in Manitoba and have been offered a permanent job by their employer in Manitoba. Skilled Workers in Manitoba are not subject to a points-based assessment to determine their eligibility (though points are assigned to the candidate once he or she enters the pool of candidates)

MPNP Skilled Workers Overseas

This MPNP sub-category is for qualified skilled workers who may be outside Canada but who can demonstrate a strong connection to the province and its labour market. A points-based system is used to assess candidates according to factors such as age, language proficiency, work experience, education and adaptability.

Posted in Canada, Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Australia Business or Investor Visa

Australia Business or Investor Visa

Australia Business or Investor Visa

Australia Business or Investor Visa

If you are an experienced business owner or investor and wish to establish a new business or buy an existing business or invest in Australia, you could qualify for Australian business visa or Australian investor visa under Business Innovation and Investor visa category. Business and Investor visa is a provisional visa valid up to four years and provides a pathway to secure Australian permanent residence after complying with the provisional visa conditions. It has four streams, Business Innovation, Business Investor, Significant Investor and Premium Investor stream with differing qualifying criteria outlined hereunder.

COMMON ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

The following are common eligibility criteria for all four streams:

  • have a demonstrated successful business or investment career;
  • lodge EOI, be nominated by an Australian State or Territory government agency or Austrade and receive the invitation to apply;
  • not be involved in any unacceptable business or investment activity;
  • meet Health and Character requirements.

BUSINESS INNOVATION STREAM

This is a point’s based visa for those with business skills wanting to establish, develop and manage a new or existing business in Australia and meeting following requirements:

  • score at least 65 points;
  • be aged under 55 years;
  • have functional English or pay additional Visa Application Charge;
  • have successfully managed one or more businesses with annual turnover of at least A$500,000;
  • have combined net business and personal assets valued at A$800,000

BUSINESS INVESTOR STREAM

This is also a point’s based visa for those wanting to make designated investments of A$1.5 million and meeting following criteria:

  • be aged under 55 years;
  • have functional English or pay additional Visa Application Charge;
  • have at least 3 years experience in managing a qualifying business or eligible investments;
  • have a combined net business, personal and investment assets valued at A$2.25 million

SIGNIFICANT INVESTOR STREAM

There is no points test or upper age restrictions or English language requirements for this visa. To qualify, you need to:

  • invest A$5.00 million into qualifying significant investments;
  • have a combined net business, personal and investment assets valued at A$5.00 million

PREMIUM INVESTOR STREAM

There is no points test or upper age restrictions or English language requirements for this visa. To qualify, you need to:

  • invest A$15.00 million into complying premium investments;
  • have a combined net business, personal and investment assets valued at A$15.00 million

HOW TO PROCEED

Global Gateways provide comprehensive immigration service. Contact us if you wish to apply for Australian Business visa or Australian Investor visa.

Posted in Australia, Business / Investor Visa, Immigration, Visa and Immigration | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Annual New Zealand Net Migration remains high

Annual New Zealand Net Migration remains high: touches 72,100 in the August 2017

Annual New Zealand Net Migration remains high: touches 72,100 in the August 2017

Annual New Zealand Net Migration remains high

Annual net migration to New Zealand was 72,100 in the August 2017 year, Stats NZ said today. This compared with 69,100 in the August 2016 year. Migrant arrivals reached 132,200, a new annual record, and migrant departures were 60,100 in the year ended August 2017.

“The biggest increase in migrant arrivals were from South Africa and the United Kingdom,” population statistics senior manager Peter Dolan said. “The biggest decrease was from India, which was down 2,600 to 9,200, due to a decrease in student migrant arrivals.”

In the year ended August, the net migration was mostly driven by non-New Zealand citizens, who provided New Zealand with a net gain of 73,500 migrants, compared with 71,700 in the August 2016 year. Migration of New Zealand citizens saw a net loss of 1,500 migrants, compared with the net loss of 2,600 in the August 2016 year.

Both arrivals and departures of non-New Zealand citizens are up from a year ago. Arrivals of non-New Zealand citizens increased from 94,000 in the August 2016 year to 100,000 in the August 2017 year. Departures of non-New Zealand citizens increased from 22,300 to 26,500 over the same period.

Visitor arrivals at record high

In August 2017, 234,000 visitors arrived in New Zealand, a new August record. This was 6 percent more visitors than in August 2016. Almost half of the visitor arrivals were people coming to New Zealand from Australia.

Visitor arrivals numbered 3.7 million in the August 2017 year, a new annual record, up 9 percent from the August 2016 year. The increase was mostly due to the 86,500 (6 percent) increase in visitor arrivals from Australia, and 55,200 (21 percent) increase from the United States.

New Zealand residents departed on record number of overseas trips

Kiwis departed on 252,100 trips overseas in August 2017, up 7 percent from August 2016. Overseas trips to Australia, Fiji, and the United Kingdom saw the biggest changes in August 2017. Two in five trips overseas were to Australia.

New Zealand residents took a record 2.8 million overseas trips in the August 2017 year, up 11 percent from the August 2016 year. Of all resident departures, 43 percent were for holidays and 37 percent were for visiting friends and relatives.

Short-term travelers or migrants?

International migration statistics rely on the information provided on passenger cards at the time of travel. The reported intended length of stay in New Zealand, or intended time away from New Zealand, largely determines whether the passenger is a short-term traveller or a migrant. Generally, visitor arrivals and resident departures are those intending to stay or be away for less than one year; migrants are those intending to stay or be away for one year or more.

Posted in Immigration, New Zealand, Tourist Visa, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Provincial Ministers Consensus on Increasing Immigration Levels

Federal, Provincial Ministers Reach Consensus on Increasing Canadian Immigration Levels

Provincial Ministers Consensus on Increasing Immigration Levels

Provincial Ministers Consensus on Increasing Immigration Levels

Provincial Ministers Consensus on Increasing Immigration Levels

Political leaders responsible for immigration issues in Canada have agreed that increasing immigration levels and establishing multi-year targets would help meet labour market needs across the country.

The consensus was reached at a meeting of the Forum of Ministers responsible for Immigration (FMRI), which met in Toronto last week. This FMRI includes members from the federal, provincial, and territorial governments.

Currently, Canada’s annual immigration levels plan for 2017 sets a target of 300,000 new permanent residents for the year. Earlier this summer, federal Minister of Immigration Ahmed Hussen confirmed that this figure would form the new ‘baseline’ for immigration targets under the current federal government. The government had previously alluded to moving to a multi-year plan — instead of the current annual model — in order to provide certainty and help inform long-term planning.

Under the current plan, around 57 percent of new permanent residents settle as economic migrants. This share includes newcomers who apply through one of the economic programs managed under the Express Entry system, as well as skilled workers destined for the province of Quebec and applicants to one of the Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs). The plan also allows Canadian citizens and permanent residents to sponsor family members, including spouses and common-law partners, while also maintaining Canada’s international obligations and humanitarian tradition with respect to refugee resettlement.

The government’s annual immigration plan is usually presented to Parliament in the preceding fall. It remains to be seen exactly what the next plan may include; the fact that the Ministers have reached a consensus — and publicly affirmed that they have done so — may be a prelude to a multi-year plan.

“Canada has welcomed generations of newcomers who have contributed to Canada’s well-being, economic prosperity, competitiveness, and success as a nation. We are committed to ensuring that newcomers, including refugees, integrate and contribute fully to the Canadian economy and society. We continue to help newcomers find jobs and make lasting connections within their communities,” said Minister Hussen.

Another important agreement to come out of the meeting is the development of a federal-provincial-territorial plan to clarify how settlement priorities are set, and how information is shared among all orders of government. In a statement following the meeting, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) stated that enhanced collaboration across governments is needed to support the delivery of high-quality settlement services and successful outcomes for all newcomers.

Ian Wishart, Manitoba Minister of Education and Training and FMRI provincial-territorial co-chair, spoke of a shared commitment to “maintaining an open dialogue and working together to achieve our shared immigration objectives in building a stronger, more prosperous and united Canada.”

Finally, the Ministers discussed the promotion of Francophone immigration to communities outside Quebec with the goal of increasing Francophone immigration. Currently, some federal initiatives support that goal. Last June, IRCC changed the Express Entry Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) so that Francophone candidates could be awarded additional points. The federal government also recently launched a temporary work stream within the International Mobility Program called Mobility Francophone, making it easier for employers outside Quebec to hire French-speaking skilled workers.

In addition, Canada’s most populated province, Ontario, offers a French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream, aligned with the Express Entry system, for candidates with ability in French and English.

The FMRI also discussed a pan-Canadian approach to dealing with the current arrival of asylum seekers into Canada through irregular means (i.e. not through official border crossings). This approach would include enhanced intergovernmental collaboration to support orderly migration and scenarios planning while protecting Canada’s border and the safety and security of Canadians.

Posted in Canada, Immigration | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Political leaders of Canada agree to accept more immigrants

Political leaders of Canada agree to accept more immigrants

Political leaders of Canada agree to accept more immigrants

Political leaders of Canada agree to accept more immigrants

The FMRI (Forum of Ministers responsible for Immigration), which comprises the members of the provincial, territorial and federal governments, met in Toronto in the second week of September. The forum, which includes political leaders responsible for immigration issues in Canada, have agreed to increase immigration levels and set up multi-year targets to help to meet the needs of the labour market across Canada.

Meanwhile, annual immigration levels plan for 2017 of Canada was set at a ceiling of 300,000 new permanent residents. In summer of 2017, Ahmed Hussen, federal Minister of Immigration, clarified that this number would be the new standard for immigration targets under the present federal government.

As per the current plan, about 57 percent of new permanent residents are economic migrants. Included in this are newcomers who apply via an economic program managed under the Express Entry system, besides skilled workers headed to Quebec province and one of the PNPs (Provincial Nominee Programs) applicants. The plan also lets citizens and permanent residents of Canada sponsor family members such as common-law partners and spouses.

Hussen was quoted by CIC News as saying that their country has welcomed for decades newcomers whose contribution to Canada’s welfare, competitiveness, economic success and so on is established. He said that Canada was committed to seeing to it that newcomers integrate and fully contribute to their economy and society. Hussen said that they would continue to support new entrants of Canada to find employment and forge memorable connections within their communities.

Ian Wishart, FMRI provincial-territorial co-chair and Manitoba Minister of Education and Training, said that they had a shared commitment to continue to have an open dialogue and work jointly to attain their shared immigration objectives of building a Canada, which is united, stronger and more prosperous.

In June 2016, IRCC modified the Express Entry CRS (Comprehensive Ranking System) in order that candidates whose native tongue is French could be awarded additional points. A temporary work stream within the International Mobility Program known as Mobility Francophone was also introduced by the federal government to make it easier for employers outside of Quebec to recruit French-speaking skilled workers.

Moreover, Ontario offers a Skilled Worker Stream for French speakers, which is adjusted with the Express Entry system, for candidates having the ability to speak English and French.

Posted in Canada, Immigration, Visa and Immigration | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment