Canada family sponsorship eligibility requirements

Canada family sponsorship eligibility requirements

Canada family sponsorship eligibility requirements

Canada family sponsorship eligibility requirements

Through the Family Class category of Canadian immigration, Canadian citizens and permanent residents may sponsor close family members for Canadian immigration.

In order for a Family Class application to be successful, both the sponsor in Canada and their sponsored family member must meet immigration requirements. These requirements differ depending under which program the application is submitted.

Spouse or Common Law Partner Sponsorship

Requirements for the Sponsor:

The sponsor must be at least 18 years of age;

The sponsor must be a Canadian permanent resident living in Canada or a Canadian citizen;

The sponsor cannot be in prison, bankrupt, under a removal order (if a permanent resident) or charged with a serious offence; and

The sponsor cannot have been sponsored to Canada as a spouse within the last 5 years.

Requirements for the Sponsored Person:

The sponsored person must be at least 16 years of age and

The sponsored person must not be too closely related by blood to the sponsor.

Requirements for the nature of the relationship:

The applicant must prove that the relationship between the sponsor and the sponsored person qualifies under one of three categories:

Spouse: This means that the Sponsor and the Sponsored Person are legally married. For those married within Canada, a Certificate of Marriage from the province or territory where the marriage took place will show that the marriage is valid. Note that same-sex marriages performed within Canada are valid for spousal sponsorship. If the marriage took place outside of Canada, it must be valid under the law of the country where it took place as well as under Canadian federal law. Same-sex marriages that took place outside of Canada are not valid for spousal sponsorship, but an application can be made under either the common-law partner or conjugal partner categories if such a relationship can be proven.

Common-law partner: In order to establish a common-law relationship, the Sponsor and the Sponsored Person must cohabit continuously for at least one year, excluding brief absences for business or family reasons.

Conjugal partner: Conjugal partners can be of either opposite-sex or same-sex. A sponsored person is defined as conjugal partner if:

Exceptional circumstances beyond their control have prevented the applicants from qualifying as common-law partners or spouses, such as immigration barriers or legal restrictions limiting divorce or same-sex relationships; and

The applicants have had a mutually dependent relationship for at least one year with the same level of commitment as a marriage or a common-law union. This can require a demonstration of emotional ties and intimacy, financial closeness, such as joint ownership of assets or mutual financial support, and efforts to spend time together and reunite.

Parent and Grandparent Family Class Sponsorship

Requirements for the Sponsor:

  • The sponsor and their relative must sign a sponsorship agreement that commits the sponsor to provide financial support to their relative, if necessary. If sponsoring a person coming to the Province of Quebec, an “undertaking” with the Province must be signed.
  • The sponsor must promise to provide financial support for the relative and any other eligible relatives accompanying them for a period of 20 years. The time period begins the day the parent or grandparent becomes a permanent resident.
  • The sponsor must meet the minimum income threshold for this program.

Requirements for the Sponsored Person:

  • The sponsored person must be the parent(s) or grandparent(s) of the sponsor.

Parent and Grandparent Super Visa Sponsorship

Requirements for the Sponsor:

  • The sponsor must be the child or grandchild of the sponsored person;
  • The sponsor must provide a written commitment of financial support; and
  • The sponsor must meet the minimum income threshold for this program.

Requirements for the Sponsored Person:

  • The sponsored person must be the parent or grandparent of the sponsor;
  • The sponsored person must be admissible to Canada as a visitor;
  • The sponsored person must prove that he or she has bought Canadian medical insurance coverage for at least one year; and
  • The sponsored person must undergo an Immigration Medical Examination.

Dependent Child Sponsorship

Requirements for the Sponsor:

  • The sponsor must be 18 years of age;
  • The sponsor must be a Canadian permanent resident living in Canada or a Canadian citizen; and
  • The sponsor cannot be in prison, bankrupt, under a removal order (if a permanent resident) or charged with a serious offence.

Requirements for the Sponsored Person:

The sponsored person must be in one of the following situations of dependency:

  • Less than 22 years of age and not a spouse or common-law partner; or
  • Is 22 years of age or older and has depended substantially on the financial support of the parent since before the age of 22 and is unable to be financially self-supporting due to a physical or mental condition.

Requirements for nature of the relationship:

The Sponsored Person must be either:

  • The biological child of the parent if the child has not been adopted by a person other than the spouse or common-law partner; or
  • The adopted child of the parent.
Posted in Atlantic Canada, British Columbia, Canada, Canada PNP, Dependent Visa, Express Entry, Immigration, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Significant changes to skilled visas unveiled

Significant changes to skilled visas unveiled

Significant changes to skilled visas unveiled

Significant changes to skilled visas unveiled

Industry insiders say a large number of prospective visa applicants will find it hard to meet the new requirements for some visas.

Changes flagged to the skilled visas by the Federal Government last year are due to take effect next month.

The government, last year announced it was axing the temporary employer-sponsored 457 visa which will now be replaced by two new Temporary Skill Shortage visas sometime during the next month.

The TSS visa will be available in two streams – short term and medium term.

Short term visas will be issued for two years, while medium-term visas will be issued for up to four years. A two-year work experience and market salary rate assessment will be mandatory, besides tightened English language requirements for the medium term stream. The short-term stream of the visa will not provide a pathway to permanent residency.

Many believe the mandatory work experience will eliminate many international students from the equation who were earlier able to apply for 457 visas.

Another equally critical change is being made with RSMS (Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme) and ENS (Employer Nomination Scheme) which will now, among other things, require potential visas holders to have a three-year relevant experience in the field they are being sponsored to work into.

The Department of Home Affairs confirmed during a recent seminar of migration professionals that changes to RSMS visa will be effective sometime in March.

Last year, a joint SBS The FEED and Fairfax Media investigation blew the lid off a visa scam involving RSMS visas wherein many visa applicants had paid up to $50,000 for jobs leading to permanent residency through RSMS visas.

The list of occupations accessible for these visas was massively pruned in April last year when the government announced the skilled visa reforms.

The Department hopes the implementation of these changes will help reduce instances of fraud in sponsored skilled visas.

Jujhar Singh Bajwa of Bajwa Immigration Consultancy says the mandatory work experience requirements will filter out a huge number of applicants, particularly students who were earlier able to avail of this pathway.

“I think they [students] will have to plan very carefully about what they study and where they study,” he tells SBS Punjabi.

Mr. Bajwa says these changes may push new students towards areas regional areas, such as Tasmania and Northern Territory.

“These are the places that give preference to former students who have studied there in state nominations.”

Sponsored skilled visas will also be subject to a new training levy of up to $5,000 which the government is hoping to implement in March. The legislation pertaining to that is before parliament.

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Manitoba issues 473 invitations to apply for provincial nomination

Manitoba issues 473 invitations to apply for provincial nomination

Manitoba issues 473 invitations to apply for provincial nomination

Manitoba issues 473 invitations to apply for provincial nomination

The province of Manitoba has issued new invitations to apply for a provincial nomination to 473 candidates in its Skilled Workers in Manitoba and Skilled Workers Overseas streams.

This latest draw from Manitoba’s Expression of Interest pool took place on February 26.

The breakdown of the draw was as follows:

The MPNP conducts draws based on an Expression of Interest (EOI) system wherein potential candidates submit an EOI to the province and their profiles are assigned a score based on the answers provided.

The highest scoring candidates from the EOI pool receive a Letter of Advice to Apply (LAA) to submit an application for a provincial nomination from the Government of Manitoba.

Skilled Worker in Manitoba:

  • Number of Letters of Advice to Apply issued: 283
  • Ranking score of lowest-ranked candidate invited: 489
  • In the Skilled Worker Overseas Stream, the Letters of Advice to Apply were split between two categories of candidates:
  • A total of 36 invitations were issued directly by the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP) under a Strategic Recruitment Initiative. The lowest ranked candidate invited had a score of 695.

Another 154 Letters of Advice to Apply were issued to candidates who have:

  • A close relative residing in Manitoba or past education or work experience in Manitoba;
  • At least 6 months of recent experience in an occupation on Manitoba’s in-demand occupations list; and
  • A minimum language proficiency of CLB/NCLC 5 unless work experience is primarily in a regulated occupation (minimum CLB/NCLC 7) or a compulsory trade (CLB/NCLC 6).

The lowest-ranked candidate invited in this group had a score of 599.

Both skilled workers in Manitoba and overseas candidates who received an LAA in the latest draw, and whose application for a provincial nomination is approved, may then apply to the federal government for Canadian permanent resident status.

Posted in Canada, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Manitoba, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment