Canada Job Vacancies in Last quarter of 2017 increased by 25%

Canadian job vacancies in last quarter of 2017 up nearly 25% over previous year

Canada Job Vacancies in Last quarter of 2017 increased by 25%

Canada Job Vacancies in Last quarter of 2017 increased by 25%

470,000 job vacancies reported in last three months of 2017

Job vacancies increased across Canada in the last three months of 2017 by nearly 25 percent over the same period in 2016, new data from Statistics Canada reveal.

The numbers show year-over-year job vacancies up in nine of Canada’s 13 provinces and territories in the fourth quarter of 2017, with the largest increases posted in Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia.

Across Canada, there were 470,000 job vacancies reported in the last quarter of 2017, an increase of 89,000, or 23 percent, over the final quarter of 2016.

Statistics Canada said nearly seven out of every 10 job vacancies were for full-time work and the average offered hourly wage for the unfilled jobs was $20.10.

Statistics Canada said there were 29,185 more job vacancies in Quebec than the fourth quarter of 2016, a year-over-year increase of 46 percent — Canada’s largest. The vacancies in the majority French-speaking province were most notable in the manufacturing, accommodation and food services and finance and insurance industrial sectors.

Ontario, Canada’s most populous province, had 28,085 more job vacancies in the fourth quarter of 2017 than it did in the final quarter of 2016, an increase of 17.3 percent. “This was the sixth consecutive quarter with year-over-year increases in the number of job vacancies for this province,” Statistics Canada noted, adding that vacancies rose in 15 of 20 industrial sectors, including health care and social services and accommodation and food services.

On Canada’s West Coast, British Columbia posted an increase of 15,485 job vacancies over the fourth quarter of 2017, a year-over-year quarterly increase of 21.2 percent. The greatest increases in B.C. occurred in accommodation and food services and construction.

Alberta also posted a year-over-year increase of 8,890 job vacancies in the fourth quarter of 2017, a jump of 20.9 percent over 2016, and the Atlantic province of Prince Edward Island, Canada’s least populous province, saw job vacancies rise by 285, or 27 percent, over the final quarter of 2016.

Demand outpacing labour supply

The new findings support concerns voiced in all corners of Canada, and notably Atlantic Canada, about labour shortages produced by a growing economy and an aging population that can’t meet the demand for workers. This worry was echoed in a recent speech by Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz, who identified immigration as an “important off-set” to this trend.

Poloz said Canada’s economy is hitting a “sweet spot” of rising demand and companies operating at near capacity, and this growth is translating into new jobs — and escalating job vacancies.

“None of this highly desirable economic growth can happen unless there are people available to fill the newly created jobs,” he said. “A healthy, well-functioning labour market is critical.”

Accordingly, Canada’s immigration system is responding to this need through the introduction of a multi-year immigration levels plan that has set a target of nearly one million new admissions over the three-year period spanning 2018 to 2020, the majority of which will come through Canada’s economic immigration programs.

The latest Statistics Canada data revealed that job vacancies rose in eight of Canada’s 10 largest industrial sectors.

There were 29,100 job vacancies in the professional, scientific and technical services sector, an increase of 6,230 over the same period in 2016.

Job vacancies in accommodation and food services were up by 12,000, or 25 percent, in comparison to 2016, with the increase concentrated in Quebec, British Columbia and Ontario.

Employers in manufacturing witnessed an increase of 11,000 job vacancies, or 39 percent, over the same quarter the year before. Statistics Canada said job vacancies were up in most subsectors of the manufacturing industry, led by food manufacturing, fabricated metal product manufacturing, and transportation equipment manufacturing.

The number of job vacancies in health care and social assistance rose by 8,800, or 23.4 percent, in the fourth quarter of 2017, driven by notable increases in Ontario.

There were also 8,600 more job vacancies in transportation and warehousing in the fourth quarter of 2017 compared with a year earlier, an increase of 43.5 percent. Ontario, Quebec, and Alberta all experienced large year-over-year increases.

Occupational categories

Sales and service occupations led Statistics Canada’s 10 occupational categories in terms of year-over-year job vacancies in the fourth quarter of 2017 with 33,000 more than 2016. Quebec led Canada’s provinces and territories for job vacancies in this group, followed by Ontario and British Columbia.

The natural and applied sciences occupational category had 31,115 job vacancies in the final quarter of 2017, an increase of 6,755 over the last three months of 2016.

Meanwhile, job vacancies in trades, transport, and equipment operators rose by 24,000, or 43.1 percent, over the last quarter of 2016. Related sectors also saw increases during the quarter, namely manufacturing, transportation and warehousing and construction. British Columbia and Alberta had the largest increases in vacancies in this occupational category.

Posted in British Columbia, Canada, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Ontario, Quebec, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ontario Issued new invitations to express entry candidates

Ontario issues new invitations to Express Entry candidates

Ontario issues new invitations to Express Entry candidates

Ontario issues new invitations to Express Entry candidates

Ontario issues new invitations to Express Entry candidates

Draws are the second in last 7 days through French-Speaking Skilled Worker and Skilled Trades streams

The Government of Ontario has issued new Notifications of Interest to Express Entry candidates through its French-Speaking Skilled Worker and Skilled Trades streams.

The draws are the second in the last seven days through these two streams, with 34 invitations issued through the French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream (FSSW) and 29 issued through the Skilled Trades Stream (ST).

The April 19 FSSW draw targeted Express Entry candidates who had submitted their Express Entry profile between January 1 and April 19, 2018. ST draw, which took place April 18, targeted Express Entry candidates who had submitted their profiles between January 1 and April 18, 2018.

Ontario has now issued a total of 366 Notifications of Interest, or NOIs, to Express Entry candidates through the French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream in 2018, and another 488 through the Skilled Trades Stream.

Ontario’s other Express Entry-linked immigration stream, the Human Capital Priorities Stream, has been it’s most active by far in 2018, issuing a total of 2,587 NOIs so far this year.

Unlike the Human Capital Priorities Stream, which generally targets Express Entry candidates with a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score of 400 or higher, neither the FSSW or ST stream has a minimum CRS score requirement.

The FSSW Stream was launched in 2015 to target French-speaking Express Entry candidates who qualify for either the Federal Skilled Worker Class or the Canadian Experience Class and who have sufficient English language abilities (CLB 6 or higher). The program was created to help bolster Ontario’s francophone population, which numbers around 500,000 people and is the largest francophone population outside of Quebec.

The Skilled Trades Stream targets qualified trades workers in the Express Entry pool with experience in an eligible trade.

Express Entry candidates who are issued a Notification of Interest by Ontario and receive a provincial nomination are awarded an additional 600 CRS points, leaving them well positioned to receive an Invitation to Apply, or ITA, in a later Express Entry Draw.

Candidates in the Express Entry pool do not apply directly to Ontario’s Express Entry streams. Candidates must first obtain an NOI from Ontario through their IRCC online account.

Once an NOI has been received, candidates have 45 calendar days from the date the NOI letter was issued to submit an online application to the OINP.

In order to pursue any of Ontario’s Express Entry-linked streams, Candidates must first submit a profile to the federal Express Entry pool.

Posted in Canada, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Ontario, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

how to choose the NOC code for Canada Immigration

How to Choose your NOC Code for Canadian Immigration

How to Choose your NOC Code for Canadian Immigration

How to Choose your NOC Code for Canadian Immigration

The National Occupational Classification (NOC) system assigns a four-digit code and job description for every occupation is the Canadian labour market. It’s a nationally recognized and standardized system that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) use to evaluate your work experience.

HOW TO CHOOSE A NOC CODE

Choosing the right National Occupational Classification (NOC) code is one of the most important parts of your immigration application. Whether you’re applying through the federal Express Entry system, or to one of many Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs), choosing the right NOC code can make or break your application.

If you claim a NOC code that doesn’t actually match your work experience, your application will be refused or returned to you. You can’t expect the visa officer that’s reviewing your application to ask you for clarification or to choose the right NOC code. It’s up to you to make sure that your NOC code matches your work experience, and that you have documentation to prove it.

Every NOC code has an associated job title, lead statement, and list of major duties and responsibilities. When you’re choosing your NOC code for immigration purposes, your actual job title and education are not important. Your work experience has to match the lead statement, and you should have performed most of the duties and responsibilities listed. Because of that, your work experience might fall under a couple of different NOC codes, or your official job title might be associated with a NOC code that doesn’t actually match your experience.

If you have experience working in a couple of different industries or positions, each of your past work experiences has its own NOC code. For immigration purposes, you generally have to claim a primary NOC code as well as NOC codes for each of your past positions. Depending on the program you’re applying to, the NOC code that you should claim as your primary one might change.

This can make choosing the right NOC code complicated. An immigration attorney can help you find the right NOC code: one that matches your work experience and optimizes your chances of successfully applying to Immigrate to Canada.

HOW CAN I PROVE THIS MY NOC CODE?

To prove that you’ve claimed the right NOC code, you have to provide some supporting documentation in your application. The most important piece of documentation is your employment reference letter.

An employment reference letter for immigration is very different from a reference letter that you would use job hunting. It might be more helpful to think of it as an employment verification letter. It has to be provided by your employer and ideally includes:

  • your job title,
  • your salary,
  • the average hours you work per week,
  • the dates of your employment, and
  • a detailed list of your employment duties.

The detailed list of your employment duties is the most important part. It’s how the visa officer reviewing your case will tell if the NOC code you claimed matches your actual work experience. Since you need to get the reference letter from your employer, you should get started on this process as soon as possible.

You can also include other supporting documentation to help prove you’ve claimed the right NOC code. For example, you can include any certification that your position requires, or pay stubs or tax returns that prove your dates of employment and salary.

If you can’t get a reference letter from your employer, you might still be able to convince the visa officer that you’ve chosen the right NOC code. Provide as much supporting documentation as possible, and include a letter that explains why you can’t provide a reference letter. That said, not having a reference letter really weakens your application so you should do everything in your power to get one.

In the end, the decision is always up to the visa officer. Even if you provide a perfect reference letter and a lot of supporting documents, there’s still no guarantee that the visa officer will be convinced that your experience falls under the NOC you claimed. That’s why it’s so important to gather as much supporting documentation as possible.

UNDERSTANDING NOC CODES

Sometimes, immigration programs will require experience in a ‘high-skilled’ occupation, or an occupation classified as NOC 0, A, or B. The easiest way to tell whether your occupation is classified as NOC 0, A, or B is to check the NOC Matrix on the Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) website.

The first digit in a NOC code identifies the Skill Type. There are ten Skill Types (0 to 9) that refer to broad areas of work. For example, Skill Type 2 includes all ‘Natural and applied sciences and related occupations’.

The second digit in a NOC code identifies the Skill Level. There are four Skill Levels, and each one is associated with two digits: A (0 and 1), B (2 and 3), C (4 and 5), and D (6 and 7). The Skill Level refers to what kind of education and training is generally necessary for an occupation. For example, Skill Level A occupations usually require a university education.

The major exception to this formula is Skill Type 0 – Management occupations because there are management occupations in every area of work. The first digit of every management occupation is 0, and the second digit refers to the Skill Type. For example, a NOC code starting with 03 refers to a management occupation in health.

When an immigration program requires experience in an occupation classified as Skill Level 0, A, or B, it means that either:

The first digit must be 0, or

The second digit must be between 0 and 3.

The first digit in a NOC code refers to the Skill Type of the occupation:

NOC Skill Types:

0              Management occupations

1              Business, finance, and administration occupations

2              Natural and applied sciences and related occupations

3              Health Occupations

4              Occupations in education, law and social, community and government services

5              Occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport

6              Sales and service occupations

7              Trades, transport and equipment operators and related occupations

8              Natural resources, agriculture and related production occupations

9              Occupations in manufacturing and utilities

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