Ontario issued new invitations through Express Entry linked stream

Ontario issues new invitations through Express Entry-linked streams

Ontario issues new invitations through Express Entry-linked streams

Ontario issues new invitations through Express Entry-linked streams

Ontario issued new invitations through Express Entry linked stream

1,165 invitations issued through Skilled Trades and French-Speaking Skilled Worker streams in 2018

Ontario has issued new invitations to apply for a provincial nomination to 75 Express Entry candidates through its Skilled Trades and French-Speaking Skilled Worker streams.

The latest invitation rounds were held May 16 and 17 and are the seventh that Ontario has held through the two streams since the end of March.

The Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP) said the 45 Express Entry candidates who received invitations through the Skilled Trades Stream submitted their Express Entry profiles between January 1, 2018, and May 16, 2018.

The 30 Express Entry candidates invited through the French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream submitted their Express Entry profiles between January 1, 2018, and May 17, 2018.

There is no minimum Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score requirement for either stream and Express Entry candidates who are nominated by Ontario receive an additional 600 points toward their CRS score.

Ontario has now issued 697 Notifications of Interest (NOIs) through the Skilled Trades Stream since the start of 2018. Another 438 Express Entry candidates have received NOIs through the French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream this year and 2,587 Express Entry candidates have been invited through Ontario’s other Express Entry-linked stream, the Human Capital Priorities Stream.

The OINP says it will continue issuing NOIs to candidates in the federal Express Entry pool who qualify for one of Ontario’s Express Entry streams “on a regular basis.”

The Skilled Trades Stream is for skilled workers with a valid Express Entry profile who qualify for the Canadian Experience Class and have work experience in an eligible skilled trade.

The French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream was launched in 2015 to target French-speaking Express Entry candidates who qualify for either the Federal Skilled Worker Class or the Canadian Experience Class and who have sufficient English language abilities (CLB 6 or higher).

There are also unique provincial criteria that candidates must meet.

Express Entry candidates who received an NOI in these latest invitation rounds have 45 calendar days from the date the NOI letter was issued to submit an online application to the OINP.

The first step to pursuing any of Ontario’s Express Entry-linked streams is to submit a profile to the federal Express Entry pool.

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New report calls for raising Canada’s immigration rate

New report calls for raising Canada’s immigration rate

New report calls for raising Canada’s immigration rate

New report calls for raising Canada’s immigration rate

Raising admissions to 415,000 by 2030 would off-set aging population and spur economy, Conference Board of Canada says

Increasing Canada’s immigration rate to one percent of its total population beginning in 2030 would help offset the challenges caused by an aging population and contribute to economic growth, a new report by the Conference Board of Canada argues.

The increase would represent 415,000 new admissions to Canada, whose population would be pushing 42 million people in 2030.

“Based on current demographic trends, increasing the immigration rate to one percent by the early 2030s will allow Canada to replicate its population growth rate of recent decades (one percent) and support modest labour market and economic growth over the long term,” say the report’s authors, Kareem El-Assal and Daniel Fields of the Conference Board’s National Immigration Centre.

Last November, Canada’s federal government announced a new multi-year immigration levels plan that will see admissions ramp up to 340,000 across all immigration programs by 2020 — an immigration rate of 0.9 percent. The admissions target for 2018 is set at 310,000, or a rate of 0.84 percent.

The report looks at no immigration vs 1%

The new report echoes calls by the Government of Canada, provincial governments, economists and business leaders across the country for increased immigration to counter labour shortages produced by Canada’s aging population.

The Conference Board report makes the case for this increase to one percent by contrasting it with a fiscal snapshot of Canada in the 2030s if all immigration to the country was stopped — an “implausible” scenario, the authors acknowledge, but one that puts their modest raise into perspective.

Without immigration, Canada’s labour force would shrink, slowing the estimated average annual real GDP growth rate to 1.3 percent by 2040 and more than likely forcing tax rates to increase as the number of taxpayers declined.

Fewer taxpayers could also affect living standards and threaten the ability of Canada and its provinces to cover the cost of vital public services for aging Canadians, notably health care.

Immigration already plays a vital economic role in Canada, accounting for almost all labour force growth and nearly three-quarters of its annual population growth, the report notes. The Conference Board of Canada has already projected that immigration will account for 100 percent of Canada’s annual population growth by 2034, when natural population increase (births minus deaths) is expected to drop below zero.

The authors estimate that an immigration rate of one percent by 2030 will contribute one-third of Canada’s projected average annual real GDP growth rate of 1.9 percent that year.

Government action required

The report warns, however, that there is a potential downside to such an increase if Canada does not take corresponding steps to improve the labour market outcomes of immigrants.

To address this issue, it offers three recommendations for Canadian policymakers:

Improve labour market integration so immigrants can better contribute to Canada’s economic and fiscal fortunes.

Identify ways to grow Canada’s economy so Canadian-born and immigrant workers alike can access good job opportunities and the necessities that contribute to Canada’s high living standards, including social services like education, healthcare, affordable housing.

Ensure public support for immigration through strong border management, maintaining the integrity of Canada’s immigration and temporary resident programs, and promoting “safe spaces for open debate on the merits and drawbacks of immigration.”

Improving the outcomes of newcomers arriving through Family Class sponsorships by removing labour market barriers is also critical, the authors argue.

“Low earnings and the prevalence of chronic low income among the family class are issues of concern that need to be addressed to help boost the living standards of immigrant families, and to help Canada benefit from their human capital in the labour market as it becomes more dependent on immigrant support for its economic growth,” they write.

Also required is a fundamental shift in the way the outcomes of family class immigrants are assessed, one that would put the focus on household incomes instead of individual income.

Many newcomers who are sponsored through the family class, including parents and grandparents, contribute to the household income and provide child care, which allows a bread winner to work longer hours.

“This is a key consideration as Canada continues to evaluate the distribution of its immigrant composition in the years and decades to come,” the authors write. “While Canada has prioritized economic class admissions since the mid-1990s, family class admissions should also be viewed as part of economic development policy.

“Immigrant families are faring well in relation to Canadian-born families in important economic metrics such as household income and homeownership. Immigrant families bring other benefits as well, such as boosting immigrant retention rates, important to population growth in Atlantic Canada, and to all other provinces as well.”

Posted in Atlantic Canada, British Columbia, Canada, Canada Open Work Permit, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

CRS Score reaches 2018 low in Latest Express Entry Round

CRS score reaches new 2018 low in latest Express Entry round

CRS Score reaches 2018 low in Latest Express Entry Round

CRS Score reaches 2018 low in Latest Express Entry Round

May 23 draw issues 3,500 Invitations to Apply

The Government of Canada held a new Express Entry draw on Wednesday, May 23, issuing 3,500 invitations to apply for permanent residence. The Comprehensive Ranking System cut-off score for this draw was 440.

Today’s score is a new low for 2018, surpassing the previous low of 441 that was established in the invitation round on April 25 and repeated on May 9.

The tie-break date and time for this latest invitation round was December 30, 2017, at 06:39:40 UTC. This means that all candidates with a CRS score above 440, as well as those candidates with scores of 440 who submitted their profile before this time, received an Invitation to Apply (ITA) in this invitation round.

Today’s draw is the tenth of 2018 and the fourth in a row to issue 3,500 ITAs, bringing the 2018 ITA total to 31,500.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada has increased draw sizes in 2018 from 2,750 at the start of the year to 3,000 in February and March and now to 3,500 for each of the four draws held since the start of April.

Larger invitation rounds can have the effect of lowering the CRS cut-off score or keeping it lower than smaller draws, which is what we’ve seen in these last four draws. The increase in draw sizes to 3,500 in the draws held April 11, April 25, May 9 and now May 23 has corresponded with a reduction in the CRS cut-off score by six points, from 446 to today’s low of 440.

The Government of Canada’s target for 2018 is 74,900 admissions through the three economic immigration classes administered by the Express Entry system — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, the Federal Skilled Trades Class and the Canadian Experience Class. For 2019, the target for these three classes is set at 81,400.

“Seeing the CRS cut-off drop is always a welcome sight, even if it was only by one point,” said Attorney David Cohen, senior partner at the Campbell, Cohen immigration law firm in Montreal.

“We’re not even at the half-way point of 2018 and we’re still a long way off the admissions target for this year, so it’s going to be interesting to see what that means for the CRS score in upcoming draws.”

The following are hypothetical examples of candidates who would have received an ITA in today’s invitation round.

Gary and Rita are married and are 29 and 31 years old respectively. Each holds a bachelor’s degree and they have both been working as software engineers for four years… They have each also each written the IELTS and scored an 8 in each category. Neither has ever worked or studied in Canada and the couple entered the Express Entry pool with Gary as the principal applicant. Gary’s CRS score of 440 would have been sufficient to obtain an ITA in the May 23 Express Entry Draw.

Priya is 35 years old, has two bachelor’s degrees, and has been working as an accountant for five years. She has advanced English language proficiency and has never worked or studied in Canada. Her CRS of 441 would have been sufficient to obtain and ITA during the most recent draw from the Express Entry pool.

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