CRS Score reaches 2018 low in Latest Express Entry Round

CRS score reaches new 2018 low in latest Express Entry round

CRS Score reaches 2018 low in Latest Express Entry Round

CRS Score reaches 2018 low in Latest Express Entry Round

May 23 draw issues 3,500 Invitations to Apply

The Government of Canada held a new Express Entry draw on Wednesday, May 23, issuing 3,500 invitations to apply for permanent residence. The Comprehensive Ranking System cut-off score for this draw was 440.

Today’s score is a new low for 2018, surpassing the previous low of 441 that was established in the invitation round on April 25 and repeated on May 9.

The tie-break date and time for this latest invitation round was December 30, 2017, at 06:39:40 UTC. This means that all candidates with a CRS score above 440, as well as those candidates with scores of 440 who submitted their profile before this time, received an Invitation to Apply (ITA) in this invitation round.

Today’s draw is the tenth of 2018 and the fourth in a row to issue 3,500 ITAs, bringing the 2018 ITA total to 31,500.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada has increased draw sizes in 2018 from 2,750 at the start of the year to 3,000 in February and March and now to 3,500 for each of the four draws held since the start of April.

Larger invitation rounds can have the effect of lowering the CRS cut-off score or keeping it lower than smaller draws, which is what we’ve seen in these last four draws. The increase in draw sizes to 3,500 in the draws held April 11, April 25, May 9 and now May 23 has corresponded with a reduction in the CRS cut-off score by six points, from 446 to today’s low of 440.

The Government of Canada’s target for 2018 is 74,900 admissions through the three economic immigration classes administered by the Express Entry system — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, the Federal Skilled Trades Class and the Canadian Experience Class. For 2019, the target for these three classes is set at 81,400.

“Seeing the CRS cut-off drop is always a welcome sight, even if it was only by one point,” said Attorney David Cohen, senior partner at the Campbell, Cohen immigration law firm in Montreal.

“We’re not even at the half-way point of 2018 and we’re still a long way off the admissions target for this year, so it’s going to be interesting to see what that means for the CRS score in upcoming draws.”

The following are hypothetical examples of candidates who would have received an ITA in today’s invitation round.

Gary and Rita are married and are 29 and 31 years old respectively. Each holds a bachelor’s degree and they have both been working as software engineers for four years… They have each also each written the IELTS and scored an 8 in each category. Neither has ever worked or studied in Canada and the couple entered the Express Entry pool with Gary as the principal applicant. Gary’s CRS score of 440 would have been sufficient to obtain an ITA in the May 23 Express Entry Draw.

Priya is 35 years old, has two bachelor’s degrees, and has been working as an accountant for five years. She has advanced English language proficiency and has never worked or studied in Canada. Her CRS of 441 would have been sufficient to obtain and ITA during the most recent draw from the Express Entry pool.

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How to bring family to USA while you on a Student Visa

Bringing Family to the U.S. While on a Student Visa

How to bring family to USA while you on a Student Visa

How to bring family to USA while you on a Student Visa

If you’re applying for an F-1 or M-1 visa, your spouse and children may be able to travel to and stay in the U.S. with you

Planning to study in the U.S. on an F-1 or M-1 visa? If so, your spouse and minor children (under 21 years of age and unmarried) may request visas to come and stay in the United States with you. They are eligible for visas (F-2 and M-2) simply by virtue of being your spouse and children–in other words, they won’t have to prove that they are coming to the United States for a specific purpose, such as to travel or study.

Your family members will not get visas automatically, however. First, you will have to prove that they are really your spouse and children, as discussed below. Also realize that certain consulates, particularly those in Southeast Asia, have been known to deny student visas to family members in order to ensure the return of the student.

Your family members will also have to fill out a separate set of application forms, summarized on the checklist below. Once you have filled out your own form and prepared your documents, helping your family members with their applications should be no problem. In fact, you have probably covered some of the requirements for your family members’ applications already, for example when you dealt with such necessities as proving that your financial resources were enough to cover your accompanying family along with yourself.

Who Counts As a Family Member?

The F-2 and M-2 visas were specially created for the legal spouse and children of F-1 and M-1 students. Children who over the age of 21 or who are married will not qualify. If you want to bring your spouse and children to the United States while you study, you will have to prove that they are in fact your spouse and children. To do so, use official marriage and birth certificates.

Make Sure Your Family Members Are Not Inadmissible

Every applicant for a U.S. visa, your family members included, must prove that they don’t present such a high health, security or other risks that they cannot be admitted to the United States. If one member of your family is found to be inadmissible, that person’s visa could be denied even if the other family members’ visas are granted.

Other Family Members May Be Able to Come Along As Tourists

Family members who are not your spouse and children do not receive the same recognition when it comes to U.S. visas. Your live-in domestic partner for example, will not qualify for an F-2 visa if you have not actually gotten married.

However, such family members may not be left completely out in the cold. A B-2 (tourist) visa may be given to family or household members with close ties to you, such as elderly parents or domestic partners of the same or opposite sex. See A B-2 Visa for Visiting the U.S. as a Tourist: Do You Qualify?  for details on obtaining a U.S. tourist visa.

Overseas Family Members’ Checklist

Although your family members’ applications are dependent on yours, each member of your family will need to be just as careful as you are to prepare a complete application. Your spouse or children’s visas may be rejected if the applicant doesn’t prepare a satisfactory application, is inadmissible, or doesn’t appear likely to return to your home country.

Your family’s applications should include the following items:

  1. Receipt for having filled out Form DS-160, Nonimmigrant Visa Application online.
  2. Proof of family member’s relationship to you (copy of marriage or birth certificate)
  3. Copy of your family member’s SEVIS dependent Form I-20
  4. Passport (valid for at least six months beyond your family members’ intended period of stay)
  5. Documents showing that your family members will return to your home country
  6. Copies of your documents showing that you can pay your tuition, fees and the whole family’s living expenses
  7. Visa fee ($160 as of late 2016)
  8. Two passport-style photos.
Posted in Dependent Visa, Study Abroad, USA, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Changes happen in the New Zealand Visa Processing Time

What do the Changes happen in the New Zealand Visa Processing Time

The Changes happen in the New Zealand Visa Processing Time

The Changes happen in the New Zealand Visa Processing Time

Changes to Processing Times Displayed on the Website

Updated visa application processing times are now displayed on the INZ website, providing consistent and more accurate processing information about a larger number of application types.

The website previously displayed target timeframes which are not regularly updated. This change is proposed in response to customer feedback.

The INZ website shows the range of time taken to process applications in two ways:

The ‘Visa processing times’ page shows the time taken to process 75%, 90% and 95% of applications for the most common application types (based on enquires to the Immigration Contact Centre (ICC))

The Fees and office finder, visa records and visa factsheets, show the time taken to process 90% of a particular application type.

These processing times are calculated from applications taken in the past three months, and will be updated at the beginning of each month. Processing times are displayed for visas as well as for other types of applications, such as visa transfers and employer schemes (such as Employer Accreditation).

Processing times are impacted each month by changes in application volumes, seasonal peaks, complex cases, and incomplete applications. The new processing times will not differentiate between online and paper applications, or by processing office. Wherever possible, you should lodge your application online as it helps to streamline processing arrangements.

INZ encourages you to check the INZ website for the latest visa processing times before calling the ICC for this information.

Application processing times

We process applications as soon as we can. To avoid delaying your application, check that your information is complete and correct.

These processing times are for applications completed in the 3 months to 1 May 2018. Where the number of days is greater than 90, the days have been divided by 30 and rounded to the nearest month to provide a timeframe in months

These times may help you to estimate the time needed to complete your application. Individual processing times will depend on the complexity of an application, on the need for further information, and on the number of other applications we have received

Visitor Visa Processing Time:

Visa 75% of applications completed within: 90% of applications completed within: 95% of applications completed within:
Visitor General 11 days 21 days 31 days

Student Visa Processing Time:

Visa 75% of applications completed within: 90% of applications completed within: 95% of applications completed within:
Fee Paying Student 19 days 34 days 45 days
Variation of conditions on a student visa 13 days 18 days 28 days

Work Visa Processing Time:

Visa 75% of applications completed within: 90% of applications completed within: 95% of applications completed within:
Essentials Skills 48 days 68 days 87 days
Partner of a New Zealander 64 days 3 months 5 months

Residence Class Visas

Visa 75% of applications completed within: 90% of applications completed within: 95% of applications completed within:
Partner of a New Zealander 7 months 9 months 11 months
Permanent Resident Visa 13 days 17 days 21 days
Posted in Business / Investor Visa, Immigration, New Zealand, Study Abroad, Tourist Visa, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment