IRCC issued 3350 invitations to apply for Canadian Permanent Residence

IRCC issued 3350 invitations to apply for Canadian Permanent Residence

IRCC issued 3350 invitations to apply for Canadian Permanent Residence

New Express Entry draw invites 3,350 candidates to apply for Canadian permanent residence

Record 2019 continues as ITAs reach 14,500

The Government of Canada has issued 3,350 invitations to apply for Canadian permanent residence to candidates in the Express Entry system in a draw held February 20.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has now issued a total of 14,500 Invitations to Apply (ITAs) in 2019, which remains the biggest start to a year since the Express Entry system’s introduction in 2015.

The 14,500 ITAs are an increase of 70 percent over the number issued at this same juncture in 2018 — a year that saw IRCC set the current Express Entry ITA record of 89,800.

The Express Entry system manages the pool of candidates for Canada’s three Federal High Skilled economic immigration programs — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, Federal Skilled Trades Class and Canadian Experience Class — and is designed to expedite the immigration process for those candidates invited to apply for Canadian permanent residence.

Invitations are issued in accordance with a candidate’s Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score, which is based on factors including age, education, skilled work experience and proficiency in English or French.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) issues invitations to apply for Canadian permanent residence, known as ITAs, to a set number of the highest-ranked candidates through regular draws from the pool, which typically take place every two weeks.

The minimum Comprehensive Ranking System score in today’s draw was 457, an increase of 19 points from the previous draw on January 30.

The fact the minimum CRS score increased in the February 20 draw can be largely attributed to the three weeks that elapsed since the previous draw on January 30.

More time between draws allows more time for the Express Entry pool to replenish with higher-scoring candidates, which can have the effect of increasing the cut-off score.

By contrast, the January 30 draw was held just one week after the previous invitation round on January 23, meaning fewer candidates had a chance to submit a profile and resulting in a lower CRS minimum score of 438.

IRCC applied its tie-break rule in the February 20 draw. The time stamp used was December 6, 2018, at 12:38:11 UTC. This means that all candidates with a CRS score above 457, as well as those candidates with scores of 457 who entered their profile in the Express Entry pool before the selected date and time, received an ITA in this invitation round.

An Express Entry candidate’s CRS score can be improved and one of the best ways to do so is to obtain a nomination through Canada’s Provincial Nominee Program.

Express Entry candidates with a provincial nomination for permanent residence receive an additional 600 points toward their CRS score, which effectively guarantees an invitation to apply for Canadian permanent residence.

Provinces including Manitoba, British Columbia and Ontario have issued invitations to apply for a provincial nomination to Express Entry candidates during the three-week gap between yesterday’s draw and the previous invitation round on January 30.

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Australia has given 2500 skill select invitations on December 2018

Australia has given 2500 skill select invitations on December 2018

Australia has given 2500 skill select invitations on December 2018

Australia has given 2500 skill select invitations on December 2018

Australia skilled immigration draw

Invitation rounds for Skilled Independent visa (subclass 189) and Skilled Regional (provisional) visa (subclass 489) visas will be run once a month.

Invitation rounds are anticipated to run on the 11th day of each month. Dates for the rounds are subject to change.

Invitation numbers in each round may vary depending on the number of applications being processed by the department.

Note: State or territory government nominations for Skilled Regional (provisional) visas (subclass 489) will not be impacted.

Current round

Invitations issued on 11 December 2018

The table below shows the number of invitations issued in the Skill Select invitation round on 11 December 2018.

Subclass Number
Skilled Independent visa (subclass 189) 2,490
Skilled Regional (provisional) visa (subclass 489) 10

Invitation process and cut offs

The highest ranked clients by points score are invited to apply for the relevant visa. For clients who have equal points scores, the time at which they reached their points score for that subclass (referred to as the date of effect) determines their order of invitation. Expressions of Interest with earlier dates of effect are invited before later dates.

Subclass Min Points
Skilled Independent visa (subclass 189) 70
Skilled Regional (provisional) visa (subclass 489) 80

Due to high levels of demand, and in keeping with previous years, the below occupation groups will be subject to pro rata arrangements to ensure availability of invitations across the program year.

Point scores and the dates of effect cut off for the pro rata occupations in the 11 December 2018 invitation round.

Occupation ID Description Min Points Score
2211 Accountants 80
2212 Auditors, Company Secretaries and Corporate Treasurers 80
2334 Electronics Engineer 75
2335 Industrial, Mechanical and Production Engineers 70
2339 Other Engineering Professionals 75
2611 ICT Business and System Analysts 75
2613 Software and Applications Programmers 70
2631 Computer Network Professionals 70

 

Invitations issued during 2018-19 program year

Skilled Independent visa (subclass 189) Skilled Regional (provisional) visa (subclass 489) Total
Jul 1000 10 1010
Aug 2490 10 2500
Sep 2490 10 2500
Oct 4340 10 4350
Nov 4340 10 4350
Dec 2490 10 2500
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Total 17150 60 17210

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How to apply Canada Temporary Work Permit

How to apply Canada Temporary Work Permit

How to apply Canada Temporary Work Permit

Canada Temporary Work Permit

Each year, more than 300,000 foreign workers come to work in Canada on Temporary Work Permits.

In order to work in Canada on a temporary basis, most foreign workers require a work permit.

For foreign workers, an offer of employment from a Canadian employer is usually required before the worker may be granted a Temporary Work Permit by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). There are several steps to this process. Depending upon the foreign worker’s country of citizenship, a Temporary Resident Visa (TRV) may also need to be obtained in order to enter Canada.

Step 1: Employer applies for Labour Market Impact Assessment, if necessary.

Step 2: Employer extends Temporary Job Offer.

Step 3: Foreign Worker applies for Work Permit.

Step 4: Work Permit is issued.

Step 1: Employer applies for Labour Market Impact Assessment, if necessary.

Before a Temporary Work Permit can be issued, the Canadian employer who wishes to hire a temporary foreign worker may need to apply for and be granted a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) by ESDC, which will grant a positive LMIA if it is satisfied that there is no Canadian citizen or permanent resident is available to do the job.

Work Permits may be issued by Canadian immigration officials without the LMIA requirement in a limited number of situations, as follows:

  • Under international agreements, such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA);
  • Due to the significant economic, social or cultural benefits the work activity will bring to Canadians;
  • As part of reciprocal agreements Canada and its provinces/territories have entered into with other countries, such as youth and teacher exchange programs;
  • So that international students studying in Canada can fulfill academic requirements, known as co-op placements;
  • To allow the spouses/common-law partners of Work Permit and certain Study Permit holders in Canada to work in Canada;
  • Because the nature of the work is charitable or religious;
  • In recognition that certain persons in Canada for reasons other than the above-mentioned, such as the making of a refugee claim, need to support themselves.

Step 2: Employer extends Temporary Job Offer.

Once the LMIA is granted, the Canadian employer can provide a temporary job offer to the foreign worker. The employer must send a copy of the positive LMIA along with a detailed job offer letter to the foreign worker.

Step 3: Foreign Worker applies for Work Permit.

With these documents, the foreign worker can apply to ESDC for a Canada Temporary Work Permit.

If the Canadian employer that is hiring is in the province of Quebec, the foreign worker may also need to obtain a Certificated acceptation du Quebec (CAQ) in order to work temporarily in Quebec. There are a number of professions in Quebec that are ‘facilitated’ and eligible for streamlined processing. Local recruitment efforts do not need to be performed by employers as part of their applications to hire temporary foreign workers for these positions in Quebec.

Step 4: Work Permit is issued.

A Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) officer will issue the Canada Temporary Work Permit at the point of entry when the foreign worker arrives in Canada.

Do you have a Canadian job offer and need a Work Permit?

In almost all cases, individuals with a job offer from a Canadian employer must secure a Temporary Work Permit to perform work in Canada.

A Temporary Work Permit may be issued for a period of time ranging from a few days to a few years. In most cases, the process of applying for a Work Permit is twofold. First, the Canadian employer must receive government permission to hire outside Canada. Once this permission has been granted, the designated employee must apply for and receive hi or her Work Permit.

A Work Permit granted for a specific job in Canada will be tied to that job. Consequently, an employee may only work for the employer specified on his or her Work Permit. If he or she finds different employment and does not yet have permanent resident status, he or she must apply for and receive a new Work Permit before performing another job in Canada.

There are a number of different ways to secure a Work Permit. Depending on one’s nationality, occupation, and intended work in Canada, there may be possibilities for expediting the process.

Are you a Canadian Employer who needs to obtain Work Permits for new employees?

Campbell Cohen’s Work Permit Service can take care of the entire Work Permit process for both Canadian employers and foreign workers.

Note that a Canada Temporary Work Permit is for those foreign workers who plan on working in Canada for a finite period of time. To work and live in Canada on a permanent basis, foreign workers must undertake the Canadian immigration process. However, a Temporary Work Permit may be a stepping stone to Canadian permanent residences. Once in Canada on a Temporary Work Permit, a foreign worker may qualify for Canadian immigration (permanent Residence) under the Canadian Experience Class (CEC), through a Skilled Worker category, or through one of the Provincial Nominee Programs.

Work in Canada: Basic Facts

  1. For Canadian immigration purposes, “work” is defined as an activity for which remuneration is earned or as an activity that competes directly with activities of Canadian citizens or permanent residents in the Canadian labour market.
  2. Canadian immigration authorities require a Work Permit to be issued for a limited number of work-related activities in Canada.
  3. A job offer from a Canadian employer is usually a prerequisite to receiving a Canadian Work Permit.
  4. In some instances, Canadian immigration regulations allow for Open Work Permits, which are not employer-specific.
  5. Work Permits are always temporary in nature, but can often be extended from inside Canada.
  6. Normally, Work Permits will only be granted by Canadian immigration authorities if supported by a positive “Labour Market Impact Assessment” (LMIA) letter issued by Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), indicating that the proposed employment will not adversely affect Canadian workers.
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