Canada Conducted the largest express entry draw of 2018

Canada conducted largest Express Entry draw of 2018

Canada conducted largest Express Entry draw of 2018

Canada conducted largest Express Entry draw of 2018

3,750 invitations issued to Express Entry immigration candidates with scores of 451 or above

The Government of Canada conducted its largest Express Entry draw of 2018 on Wednesday, June 13, issuing 3,750 invitations to apply for Canadian permanent residence to candidates with Comprehensive Ranking System scores of 451 or above.

Prior to the 3,750 Invitations to Apply, or ITAs, issued in today’s all-program invitation round, the largest all-program draw from the Express Entry pool of 2018 had been 3,500.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) used its tie-break rule in this draw. The tie-break date and time for this latest invitation round was July 21, 2017 at 07:01:28 UTC. This means that all candidates with a CRS score above 451, as well as those candidates with scores of 451 who submitted their profile before the specified tie-break date and time, received an ITA in this invitation round.

The number of ITAs issued in each all-program draw of 2018 has gradually increased over the course of the year. The year began with two draws of 2,750 ITAs each in January, followed by four draws of 3,000 ITAs each in February and March and four draws of 3,500 ITAs each in April and May.

It is not surprising to see the draw size increase, as Canada has higher immigration targets in 2018 than it had in 2017. Its admissions targets for 2019 and 2020 are also set to increase.

The Government of Canada’s target for 2018 is 74,900 admissions through the three economic immigration classes administered by the Express Entry system — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, the Federal Skilled Trades Class and the Canadian Experience Class. For 2019, the target for these three classes is set at 81,400.

The chart below shows that while the targets for 2018 and 2019 are higher than 2017, thus far, fewer ITAs have been issued in 2018 compared to this point in 2017.

While larger draw sizes can have the effect of lowering the minimum CRS score, the time between draws is also an important factor that can have an impact on scores.

Today’s draw was the first all-program invitation round to take place since May 23 and follows a program-specific draw that was conducted on May 30. The three weeks that elapsed between the May 23 all-program draw and this latest invitation round contributed to the higher minimum CRS score in today’s draw.

Three weeks is longer than the usual time between draws, which has typically been two weeks in 2018.

More time between draws allows the Express Entry pool to replenish, which can have the effect of raising the minimum score. More frequent invitation rounds, meanwhile, can reduce the number of new arrivals in the Express Entry pool between draws.

“Now that IRCC has increased the draw size to 3,750 for the first time in 2018, it would be interesting to see what the effect of bi-weekly or more frequent draws at this number would have on the minimum CRS score,” said Attorney David Cohen, senior partner of the Campbell Cohen Canadian immigration law firm in Montreal.

“As IRCC works towards hitting bigger Express Entry targets, we continue to see changes, both in terms of different kinds of draws and different sizes of draws.”

The following are hypothetical examples of candidates who would have received an ITA in today’s invitation round.

Fiona is 34 years old, has a master’s degree and has been working as an accountant for five years. She wrote her IELTS and scored an 8 in each category. While Fiona has never worked or studied in Canada, her CRS score of 451 would have been sufficient to obtain an ITA in today’s Express Entry Draw.

Ram is 29 years old, holds a bachelor’s degree, and has been working as a management consultant for three years. He wrote his IELTS and scored an 8 in each category. While Ram has never worked or studied in Canada, he has a sister who is a Canadian permanent resident residing in Toronto. His CRS of 453 would have been sufficient to obtain an ITA during the June 13 Express Entry Draw.

Posted in Atlantic Canada, British Columbia, Canada, Canada Open Work Permit, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Before you apply the New Zealand Immigration few things you need to think

Before you apply the New Zealand Immigration few things you need to think

Before you apply the New Zealand Immigration few things you need to think

Before you apply the New Zealand Immigration few things you need to think

When you consider moving to another country, there are a few things you need to think about.

New Zealand offers a great lifestyle but you want to ensure that it is the right move for you, your partner or spouse, and your children if you have them.

Check if your skills are in demand

New Zealand’s employment market is growing steadily. There are job opportunities available across the board but some specific skills are urgently needed. If your skills are listed as in demand you may find it an easier to get a visa.

Come for a visit

It is often a good idea to come out to New Zealand for a holiday before making the move. You can use it as an opportunity to experience life here, meet potential employers and check whether New Zealand is right for you.

Get the right advice

You can submit an application for a visa yourself or if you feel a bit unsure of the process and want a bit of extra help, you can use a licensed immigration advisor. Be aware that there may be costs involved.

Check your visa options

A visa application is not cheap, and the process can take some time, so before you start to check your visa options and work out which you are eligible to apply for.

Ensure you have the right paperwork

Make sure you check the requirements of the visa category you are applying under before you send in your application. The application process will take longer if the required information is not provided.

Use NZ Ready online planning tool

Like everything to do with migration, successful visa applications happen more often with good planning.  A great place to start is our NZ Ready online planning tool.

Posted in Immigration, New Zealand, Study Abroad, Tourist Visa, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What will the future of Express Entry look like?

What will the future of Express Entry look like?

What will the future of Express Entry look like?

What will the future of Express Entry look like?

IRCC ponders ‘changing nature of work’ and what skills Express Entry targets

Express Entry is attracting the high-skilled candidates it was built to attract but improvements to the skills it targets may be necessary, says the official in charge of Canada’s main economic immigration application system.

In a talk last week at the 2018 Canadian Immigration Summit, Patrick McEvenue, Director of Express Entry and Digital Policy with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), said his department will be undertaking an evaluation of Express Entry in the near future in order to understand both the system’s impact along with its strengths and potential areas for improvement.

Express Entry working ‘very well’

As is, McEvenue said the system is generally meeting the government’s expectations as to how Express Entry is meant to work, namely its ability to attract highly skilled candidates with the education, language proficiency and work experience necessary for “long-term success” in Canada.

“Express Entry goes after the core group we’re after very well — the majority of people with traditional tech backgrounds, we can get those very well,” he said, noting there are now three times as many candidates with Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) backgrounds in the Express Entry pool.

McEvenue also pointed to improvements such as an application processing time of six months or less, the system’s overall transparency and the evolving links between Express Entry and Canada’s Provincial Nominee Program, which the government wants to expand on.

Going Deeper into the Pool?

McEvenue said the Express Entry pool is healthy and continues to grow. As of May 24, 2018, there were 83,111 candidates in the Express Entry pool.

Each Express Entry candidate is awarded a score based on so-called human capital factors including education, work experience, age and language proficiency. Additional points are also awarded for a provincial nomination, a Canadian job offer, Canadian studies, French proficiency and a sibling living in Canada.

Candidates who rank above a minimum “cut-off” score determined by the government are invited to apply for Canadian permanent residence in draws held roughly every two weeks.

“We have a lot of people to choose from. In fact, we’d like to go deeper into our pool. We know how talented the people are below the cut-off scores,” he said.

Larger immigration targets may also help IRCC go deeper into the pool. Canada is slated to welcome close to one million people over the next three years through its Multi-Year Levels immigration plan introduced last fall. Each year between 2018 and 2020 will see year-over-year admission increases for Canada’s economic immigration programs, including a 20 percent increase over the three years in the three managed by Express Entry — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, the Federal Skilled Trades Class and the Canadian Experience Class.

If these increased admission targets result in larger draws, it could have the effect of lowering the minimum scores in Express Entry draws.

Future Improvements to Express Entry and the CRS

Along with increased targets, future changes to the system may also help different candidates succeed.

A key focus of the upcoming Express Entry evaluation will be what McEvenue called “the changing nature of work” and how that could influence the kind of skills Express Entry’s Comprehensive Ranking System, or CRS, should be targeting.

“How is the changing nature of work changing the type of skills we should be going after and our approach to selection? We based the CRS on what worked in the past — it’s great, it’s based on the best evidence available, but are those the same things that will work in the future? It’s one of the major things we’ll be thinking about this next year in the lead up to our evaluation,” he said.

The evaluation will also consider who is currently succeeding under Express Entry and how the system can work better for “groups who are not benefiting yet from Express Entry who we want to see come to Canada,” he said.

How Express Entry can better engage Canadian employers and cater to their labour needs is another area of interest, he said.

McEvenue said the coming months will involve a more profound reflection on the role Express Entry will be required to play in the years ahead and the kind of questions the evaluation should be asking.

“What questions do we need to be asking ourselves this year so we can evaluate the Express Entry system in a way that is meaningful to the broader Canadian community and is going to help guide this government and subsequent governments,” he said. “Where are we going to take the system next?”

This news was welcomed by Attorney David Cohen, senior partner at the Campbell Cohen Canadian immigration law firm in Montreal.

“As the yearly Express Entry targets continue to grow, IRCC continues to learn from data and improve the system,” he said.

“We are looking forward to seeing where increased targets will take Express Entry, and very curious to see how changes may benefit some of the candidates who have not yet found success through it.”

Posted in Canada, Canada Open Work Permit, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment