What are the steps to process Refugee Application Process

What are the steps to process Refugee Application Process

What are the steps to process Refugee Application Process

What are the steps to process Refugee Application Process

Refugee Application Process

There are several steps to Canada’s refugee application process.

Eligibility for Canada Refugee Status

Not everyone is eligible to make a refugee claim. A person is not eligible if:

  1. The claimant has ever before made a refugee claim in Canada;
  2. The claimant has been recognized as a refugee in another country and can be returned to that country;
  3. The claimant came to Canada through a designated “safe third country”;
  4. The claimant has been determined to be inadmissible on the basis of security, serious criminality, organized criminality, or violating human or international rights.

Note: Canada has signed an agreement with the United States designating the U.S. as a “safe third country”. Claimants coming from, or even just passing through the U.S., are ineligible to make refugee claims at a Canadian border crossing by land. They will be turned back to the U.S.

A Canada immigration official initially decides if a refugee claim is eligible. If the claim is made at a border crossing, a quick decision can be expected as to eligibility. It takes considerably longer for a decision with respect to eligibility if the refugee claim is first made at an immigration office inside Canada.

Referral to the Immigration and Refugee Board

If an immigration official considers the claimant to be eligible, then the file is transferred to an independent administrative tribunal called the Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB). The IRB determines whether the claimant is a genuine refugee and deserving of protection in Canada. The claimant is required to first complete a Personal Information Form (PIF) and submit it to the IRB. About 12 months later the claimant attends a hearing before a member of the IRB. In rare cases, where the evidence is exceptionally clear, a claimant may be accepted without a hearing.

Refugee status decision

If the IRB determines that the claimant is a genuine refugee, the claimant becomes a protected person and can apply for Canadian permanent residence inside Canada.

If the IRB refuses the claimant, an application for judicial review can be requested from the Federal Court of Canada. If the claimant does not succeed in Federal Court, then removal from Canada becomes probable.

Before removal, the claimant can ask for a Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA). The same grounds for protection are assessed as in a refugee claim, but the decision is made by a Canada immigration official instead of the IRB. In cases that have already been considered by the IRB, only changes in circumstances that have occurred since the IRB decision will be taken into account. In some instances, even claimants who are ineligible to make a refugee claim are entitled to a Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA).

Individuals who have a refugee claim rejected, abandoned or withdrawn may eventually apply for a Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA). This is an opportunity for people who are facing removal from Canada to seek protection by describing, in writing, the risks they believe they would face if removed.

Posted in Canada, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ontario issues new invitations to French Speaking Express Entry candidates

Ontario issues new invitations to French Speaking Express Entry candidates

Ontario issues new invitations to French Speaking Express Entry candidates

Ontario issues new invitations to French Speaking Express Entry candidates

OINP has now issued 1,006 invitations through French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream in 2018

The Government of Ontario has invited 29 Express Entry candidates to apply for a provincial nomination through its French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream.

The August 30 draw was Ontario’s twelfth through the French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream since the start of June.

The Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP) has now invited 1,006 Express Entry candidates in 29 draws through its French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream since the start of 2018.

The OINP said candidates invited in this round submitted their Express Entry profiles between January 1, 2018 and August 30, 2018.

The French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream was launched in 2015 to target French-speaking Express Entry candidates who qualify for either the Federal Skilled Worker Class or the Canadian Experience Class and are sufficiently proficient in English (CLB 6 or higher).

There are also unique provincial criteria that candidates must meet.

The stream aims to bolster Ontario’s francophone community, which numbers more than 622,000 people and is the largest French-speaking minority in Canada.

Express Entry manages the pool of candidates for Canada’s three federal economic immigration programs — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, the Federal Skilled Trades Class and the Canadian Experience Class.

Express Entry candidates who are nominated by Ontario receive an additional 600 points toward their Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score.

Key facts

Ontario is a study in contrasts. The varied landscape includes the vast, rocky and mineral-rich Canadian Shield, which separates the fertile farmland in the south and the grassy lowlands of the north.

Here are some key facts about Ontario:

  1. Ontario’s more than 250,000 lakes contain about one-fifth of the world’s fresh water
  2. In summer, temperatures can soar above 30°C (86°F), while in winter they can drop below -40°C (-40°F)
  3. Ontario’s industries range from cultivating crops, to mining minerals, to manufacturing automobiles, to designing software and leading-edge technology
  4. Cultures from around the world thrive and are celebrated in Ontario with festivals such as Caribbean Carnival, Oktoberfest and the Canadian Aboriginal Festival
  5. Travelers can enjoy the many experiences Ontario has to offer, from a wilderness expedition in the north, to a “shop till you drop into your theatre seat” city excursion

Economy

Ontario’s economy thrives through its unique combination of resources, manufacturing expertise, exports and a drive for innovation. Ontario generates 37% of the national GDP and is home to almost 50% of all employees in high tech, financial services and other knowledge-intensive industries”.

Services industry

Although Ontario is a manufacturing powerhouse, the services sector is the largest part of Ontario’s economy. It employs 79% (or 5.3 million people) of the province and makes up 76.9% of the province’s economy. Examples of Ontario’s major services sector include business and financial services, professional and scientific technical services, and arts and culture.

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CANADA ANNOUNCES IMMIGRATION LEVEL TARGETS 2018-2020

CANADA ANNOUNCES IMMIGRATION LEVEL TARGETS 2018-2020

CANADA ANNOUNCES IMMIGRATION LEVEL TARGETS 2018-2020

CANADA ANNOUNCES IMMIGRATION LEVEL TARGETS 2018-2020

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has released their immigration level targets for the next three years! According to this new plan, Canada will accept almost one million new immigrants between now and 2020!

In the words of Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen, 300,000 is the “new normal” for Canadian immigration. 300,000 was the overall immigration target for 2016 and 2017. Now, IRCC has announced that the 2018 target will increase to 310,000 overall new immigrants to Canada. By 2019, the target will further increase to 330,000 and by 2020 it will be 340,000. All told, that’s nearly one million newcomers entering Canada between 2018 and 2020!

2018 COMPARED TO 2017

The targets for the coming year are very similar to the ones that were set for 2017. Even more newcomers will be arriving through federal economic streams managed by the Express Entry system. IRCC is also planning to accept more provincial nominees in 2018 than they did in 2017.

Canada also plans to welcome more newcomers through family sponsorship streams in 2018. The Parents and Grandparents sponsorship program, which was restructured in 2017 to be a lottery system, doubled from 10,000 to 20,000 in 2017. In 2018, another 21,000 parents and grandparents will be able to join their families in Canada.

PLANNING AHEAD: IMMIGRATION TARGETS 2018-2020

This is the first time that IRCC has released a multi-year immigration plan. The planned targets for 2019 and 2020 will be confirmed by November 1 of each year, so they are subject to change. That said, a multi-year plan gives us a good indication of the direction that IRCC intends to head in.

Immigration Category 2018 Target 2019 Target 2020 Target
Economic 177,500 191,600 195,800
Federal Economic, includes:

Federal Skilled Worker Program

Federal Skilled Trades Program

Canadian Experience Class

74,900 81,400 85,800
Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program 1000 2000 4000
Federal Caregivers 17,000 14,000 5,000
Federal Business 700 700 700
Provincial Nominee program 55,000 61,000 67,800
Quebec Skilled Workers and Business 28,900 32,500 32,500
Family 86,000 88,500 91,000
Spouses, Partners, and Children 66,000 68,000 70,000
Parents and Grandparents 21,000 20,500 21,000
Refugees and Protected Persons 43,000 46,650 48,700
Protected Persons in Canada and Dependents Abroad 16,000 16,500 17,000
Resettled Refugees 27,000 29,150 31,700
Government-Assisted Refugees 7,500 8500 10000
Blended Visa Office-Referred 1,500 1650 1700
Privately Sponsored 18,000 4,250 4500
Humanitarian and Other 3,500 4,250 4500
Total 3,10,000 3,30,000 3,40,000

While almost every category of immigration is expected to grow over the next three years, by far the biggest growth is planned for the Federal Economic and Provincial Nominee Program categories. Not coincidentally, these are the categories that are currently managed by the very successful Express Entry system.

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