Changes to post-study work rights for international students

Changes to post-study work rights for international students

Changes to post-study work rights for international students

Changes to post-study work rights for international students

Changes to post-study work rights for international students

Following a public consultation, Government has come up with changes to immigration settings that impact post-study work rights for international students.

The changes are:

  1. To remove the employer-assisted post-study work visas at all levels;
  2. To provide a one-year post-study open work visa for students studying Level 4 – 6 and non-degree Level 7 qualifications, with an additional year for Graduate Diploma graduates who are working towards registration with a professional or trade body;
  3. To provide a two-year post-study open work visa for students studying Level 4 – 6 and non-degree Level 7 qualifications outside Auckland, provided study is completed by December 2021, at which point the entitlement for post-study work rights reverts to a one-year post-study open work visa for students studying Level 4 – 6 and non-degree Level 7 qualifications with an additional year for Graduate Diploma graduates who are working towards registration with a professional or trade body;
  4. To provide a three-year post-study open work visa for degree Level 7 or above qualifications; and
  5. To require international students studying Level 8 qualifications to be in an area specified on the Long Term Skills Shortage list, in order for their partner to be eligible for an open work visa, and in turn the partners’ dependent children to be eligible for fee-free domestic schooling.

These changes come into effect on 26 November 2018.

They are intended to support the attraction of international students studying at higher levels and preserve a pathway to residence for those with the skills and qualifications New Zealand needs, specifically through the link between more generous post-study work rights to higher level qualifications.

There has been significant growth in the international education sector over the last few years, especially in below degree level qualifications. As a result, there has been a decline in the skill level of people moving through the immigration system and granted permanent residency.

We want to ensure that post-study pathways for international students are fit-for-purpose and contribute the skills and qualifications New Zealand needs.

The Government wants to support the transition to these new immigration settings. These changes include a three year, time-limited incentive for international students to study outside Auckland. This is to ensure the benefits of international education are shared throughout all the regions of New Zealand, supporting the Government’s aims to lift regional investment, growth and productivity.

There is a three year sunset clause, to enable those parts of the sector that are most affected by the changes (Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs) and Private Training Establishments (PTEs)) to be able to successfully transition, over time, to new immigration settings. It also supports the current ITP Roadmap 2020 work underway by the Tertiary Education Commission on the long-term viability of ITPs, while ensuring that Government goals for regional growth are not undermined.

These changes will be grand-parented, so they will not impact current post-study work visa holders or current students who are undertaking a qualification that (once completed) will meet the qualification requirements as set out in current immigration settings.

These changes support the Government’s broader plans for a high-quality international system in order to generate educational, economic, social and cultural benefits to New Zealand.

Posted in Immigration, New Zealand, Study Abroad, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Skilled Visas increased in Pass Mark

SKILLED VISAS – INCREASE IN POINTS PASS MARK

Skilled Visas increased in Pass Mark

Skilled Visas increased in Pass Mark

Skilled Visas increased in Pass Mark

From 1 July 2018, there will be an increase in the pass mark for a variety of skilled visas. Skilled Independent (Permanent) (Class SI) Subclass 189, Skilled Nominated (Permanent) (Class SN) Subclass 190; and Skilled Regional Sponsored (Provisional) (Class SP) Subclass 489 applicants wishing to apply for those visas will be required to obtain a pass mark of 65 to be eligible to receive an invitation to apply. This is 5 points higher than previously required.

This new pass mark reflects the high level of interest in skilled migration to Australia and indicates the high caliber of applicants interested in the General Skilled Migration (GSM) program.

Under the transitional arrangements, the pool and pass mark from the previous instrument is preserved for all visa applications for the above visas made before, on or after 1 July 2018 in response to an invitation given by the Minister before 1 July 2018.

Potential applicants must lodge an Expression of Interest (EOI) through Skill Select which includes information about their skills and other relevant information. Skill Select is the one who then issues invitations to apply to migrate based upon a ranking of the skills etc of the applicants. Skill Select also enables State and Territory government agencies and Australian employers to view relevant information in an applicant’s EOI. It enables them to identify persons who they may nominate to help meet labour market needs in their respective jurisdictions. Similarly, Skill Select assists employers to identify skilled workers in circumstances where vacancies are unable to be met through the Australian labour market.

Skill Select is a three-stage process:

  1. Details of their qualifications, experience, English language ability and other information in their EOI are submitted;
  2. Those applicants who are sufficiently highly ranked will be invited by the Minister to make a visa application or may be nominated or sponsored by an Australian employer
  3. Applicants then make a visa application which is assessed and granted if all the relevant criteria are met.

The Minister has determined that invitations should not be issued if the occupation ceiling has been reached for any occupation. GSM categories of the skilled migration program deliver a wide variety of occupations which are in need of the medium to long term in the Australian labour market. This mechanism is known as the occupation ceiling.

The occupation ceiling limits how many persons are invited to apply for a skilled independent, skilled regional sponsored and State/Territory government nominated GSM skilled visa from a particular occupation group (as per the 4 digit ANZSCO occupation group). Its purpose is to prevent the skilled migration program from being over-supplied by a narrow range of occupations. Once the annual occupation ceiling for a unit group is reached there will be no further invitations issued for skilled migration from this unit group. Invitation rounds regularly through each migration year.

Posted in Australia, Immigration, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Express Entry draw drops CRS to 284 for Federal Skilled Trades candidates

Express Entry draw drops CRS to 284 for Federal Skilled Trades candidates

Express Entry draw drops CRS to 284 for Federal Skilled Trades candidates

Express Entry draw drops CRS to 284 for Federal Skilled Trades candidates

Program-specific draw invites 400 Federal Skilled Trades Candidates to apply for Canadian permanent residence

The Government of Canada has issued 400 invitations to Express Entry candidates in the Federal Skilled Trades Class in a rare Monday draw held September 24.

The minimum Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score for this draw was 284.

The tie-break date and time for this draw of February 18, 2018, at 12:31:16 UTC. This means that all Federal Skilled Trades Class (FSTC) candidates with a score of 284 or above who submitted their Express Entry profile before this date and time were issued an Invitation to Apply (ITA) in this draw.

Today’s draw was the 100th invitation round through the federal Express Entry system, which was introduced in January 2015 to manage applications to Canada’s three main economic immigration categories — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, Federal Skilled Trades Class and Canadian Experience Class.

Candidates who received an ITA in today’s invitation round now have 60 days to submit a complete application for permanent residence to the Government of Canada.

Program-specific invitation rounds are exceptions to the norm for draws held through the Express Entry system, the vast majority of which include candidates from all federal economic immigration programs.

The last program-specific draw to target FSTC candidates was held on May 30, 2018, and saw a total of 500 FSTC candidates with CRS scores as low as 288 invited to apply for Canadian permanent residence.

The FSTC allows individuals with valid job offers or who are certified to work in certain occupations to obtain Canadian permanent residence.

Criteria for the FSTC include:

  1. At least two years of full-time work experience (or an equal amount of part-time work experience) in a skilled trade within the last five years,
  2. Meet the job requirements for that skilled trade as set out in the National Occupational Classification, except for needing a certificate of qualification.
  3. Have a valid job offer of full-time employment for a total period of at least one year or a certificate of qualification in that skilled trade issued by a Canadian provincial, territorial or federal authority.
Posted in Canada, Canada Open Work Permit, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment