Canada’s new pathways to permanent residence for caregivers

Canada's new pathways to permanent residence for caregivers

Canada’s new pathways to permanent residence for caregivers

A look at Canada’s new pathways to permanent residence for caregivers

Interim pathway for caregivers who came to Canada after November 30, 2014, opens March 4 for three months

Foreign caregivers who came to Canada after November 30, 2014, and did not qualify for Canadian permanent residence may now have another opportunity to do so through a new interim pathway that comes into effect March 4, 2019, and will remain open until June 4, 2019.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) announced the temporary pathway February 23 along with the upcoming launch of two improved five-year pilot programs that will allow spouses and dependent children to join caregivers living and working in Canada and give them “a direct pathway” to permanent residence after two years.

Interim Pathway for Caregivers

The three-month Interim Pathway for Caregivers is for individuals who have acquired work experience in Canada since November 30, 2014, as a home childcare provider, home support worker or a combination of both through Canada’s Temporary Foreign Worker Program.

Work experience must match the initial description and list of main duties for Canada’s National Occupational Classification (NOC) Group 4411 or 4412.

The Interim Pathway for Caregivers will be open to those who intend to reside outside of Quebec and who have:

  • authorization to work in Canada on a work permit other than a Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP) work permit (at the time of applying); or
  • applied for a renewal of a work permit other than a Live-in Caregiver Program work permit; or
  • applied and is eligible for restoration of status, and held a work permit other than a Live-in Caregiver Program work permit as their most recent work permit; and
  • language skills of at least a CLB/NCLC 5 in English or French; and
  • 12 months of full-time work experience in Canada since November 30, 2014, in a relevant occupation; and
  • A minimum of a Canadian high school diploma or non-Canadian educational diploma, certificate or credential that’s equal to a Canadian high school diploma.

Foreign credentials will require an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) — issued within five years before the date of application by an approved organization — that indicates that the foreign diploma, certificate or credential is equivalent to a completed Canadian secondary school diploma.

Note that candidates whose educational credential was obtained outside Canada and who cannot obtain an ECA before the Interim Pathway for Caregivers closes on June 4, 2019, are still eligible if they provide proof that they have applied to get an ECA. Proof includes written confirmation from agency that they have submitted a request for an ECA and/or receipt of payment.

There is no limit on the number of applications that IRCC will accept through the Interim Pathway for Caregivers.

Caregivers whose current or most recent work permit is through the Live-in Caregiver Program will not be eligible for consideration through the interim pathway.

IRCC said the interim measure responds to concerns raised by some caregivers who came to Canada as in-home temporary foreign worker caregivers under the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pilot programs, which replaced Canada’s Live-in Caregiver Program in November 2014.

“The interim program will have modified criteria compared to the current pilot programs and offer a pathway to permanent residence for caregivers who, in good faith, have come to Canada and are providing care for Canadians, without a clear pathway to permanent residence,” IRCC said.

Unlike the Live-in Caregiver Program, participants in the new pilots were no longer assessed for their ability to meet permanent residence requirements for education and proficiency in English or French when applying for a work permit.

IRCC said the changes were not “well understood” and resulted in foreign caregivers arriving in Canada believing that they would be eligible for permanent residence after obtaining a temporary work permit and acquiring two years of Canadian work experience.

“Many caregivers said they found out after they arrived in Canada that they did not meet the requirements for permanent residence, including education, and were not ‘en route’ to permanent residence,” IRCC said.

“This one-time, short-term pathway will help mitigate the unique vulnerabilities that in-Canada temporary foreign worker caregivers face because they are not eligible under a current pathway to permanent residence.”

New Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker pilots

The Government of Canada also announced that it will be replacing the Caring for Children or Caring for People with High Medical Needs pilot programs with two new five-year immigration pilots that will provide caregivers and their family members with a new pathway to Canadian permanent residence.

The Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker pilots will come into effect later this year.

The new pilots respond to key concerns raised in a report issued by a national coalition of caregiver’s advocacy groups late last year that condemned the 2014 pilots as “fundamentally flawed” and accused them of extending “the legal basis for exploiting care workers.”

To avoid the confusion that the Interim Pathway for Caregivers addresses, applicants to the new pilots will be assessed against the criteria for Canadian permanent residence before they begin working in Canada.

Caregivers approved through the pilots would then have to gain two years of work experience in Canada before accessing what IRCC is calling a “direct pathway” to permanent residence.

This work experience would be acquired with an occupation-specific work permit for caregivers rather than an employer-specific work permit, meaning caregivers can switch employers if need be.

The new pilots will also allow family members to accompany caregivers to Canada. A caregiver’s spouse or common-law partner would be entitled to an open work permit and dependent children would be granted a study permit in Canada.

“Caregivers provide care for families in Canada that need it and it’s time for Canada to care for them in return,” Canada’s Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, Ahmed Hussen, said in a news release. “We are providing them with both the opportunity to bring their family members here and access permanent residency to demonstrate our commitment.”

IRCC will accept a maximum of 2,750 principal applicants each year under the Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker pilots.

Spouses and dependent children will not count against the 2,750 principal applicant limit for each pilot.

The eligibility criteria and application process for the new pilots will be announced “well before” the expiration of the two current caregiver pilots on November 29, 2019, IRCC says.

The new pilots follow a commitment by IRCC in 2017 to eliminate 80 per cent of the backlog of permanent residence applications submitted under the 2014 pilots and the now-defunct Live-in Caregiver Program and reduce the processing time from its peak of more than 60 months.

IRCC said it has now eliminated 94 percent of the backlog and reduced the processing time to 12 months.

“Ending the isolation from loved ones that too many caregivers have to endure is a huge step forward,” said David Cohen, senior partner at the Campbell Cohen Canadian immigration law firm in Montreal, Quebec.

“As Canada’s population ages, foreign caregivers are becoming more and more essential in this country and it’s great to see IRCC acknowledging the fact Canada also has to take care of them and facilitating family reunification.”

Posted in Canada, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What the Canada Provincial Nominee Program, How it will work?

What the Canada Provincial Nominee Program, How it will work?

Canada Provincial Nominee Program

Canada Provincial Nominee Program

How the Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) works:

This program is for whom?

  • Have the skills, education and work experience to contribute to the economy of a specific province or territory
  • Want to live in that province for at least 2 years, and
  • Want to become permanent residents of Canada

Each province and territory has its own “streams” (immigration programs that target certain groups) and requirements. For example, in a program stream, provinces and territories may target:

  • skilled workers
  • semi-skilled workers
  • Tradesman
  • Skilled business people
  • Investors

Choose a province or territory

  1. Alberta
  2. British Columbia
  3. Manitoba
  4. New Brunswick
  5. Newfoundland and Labrador
  6. Northwest Territories
  7. Nova Scotia
  8. Ontario
  9. Prince Edward Island
  10. Saskatchewan
  11. Yukon

The criteria by province and territory vary and can change without notice.

Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program (AINP)

Alberta is a prosperous province rich in natural beauty and resources.

Located in Western Canada, Alberta has one of Canada’s fastest growing economies. The province is home to two of Canada’s largest cities, Calgary and Edmonton, and is the most populous of the country’s three ‘Prairie provinces’. It is also renowned as one of the most beautiful parts of North America, with famous national parks, such as Banff and Jasper.

The Alberta Immigrant Nominee Program (AINP) is Alberta’s Provincial Nominee Program. Through this program, prospective immigrants with the right mix of skills and work experience needed by the province may receive an Alberta Provincial Nomination Certificate.

The AINP consists of the following immigration streams:

  • Alberta Opportunity Stream
  • Alberta Express Entry Stream
  • Alberta Self-Employed Farmer Stream

British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP)

British Columbia, Canada’s westernmost province, is a hub of cultural diversity and economic growth.

Home to the country’s third-largest city, Vancouver, British Columbia is also one of the most diverse provinces in all of Canada. British Columbia’s economy focuses on a strong natural resources sector, with an emphasis on forestry and mining. Its natural environment, with expansive forests and a unique coastal climate, is renowned as one of the most beautiful in Canada, and indeed the world.

The BC PNP is British Columbia’s Provincial Nominee Program. Through this program, prospective immigrants with the skills and experience targeted by the province may receive a British Columbia Provincial Nomination Certificate, which will allow that foreign national to apply for Canadian permanent residence.

Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP)

Located between the provinces of Ontario and Saskatchewan, the province of Manitoba is in many ways the gateway to western Canada.

With an economy based largely on natural resources and agriculture, the province of Manitoba is a major driver of Canada’s wealth. Manitoba’s population of approximately 1.2 million is located largely in and around the capital city of Winnipeg. Manitobans benefit from tight-knit communities, a stable labour market, and sweeping natural wilderness.

The MPNP is Manitoba’s Provincial Nominee Program. Through this program, prospective immigrants with skills and experience targeted by the province may receive a Manitoba Provincial Nomination Certificate.

New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program (NBPNP)

New Brunswick is the only officially bilingual province in Canada, with about 30 percent of the population speaking French as a first language. New Brunswick is home to a number of cities such as Fredericton, Saint John, and Moncton.

The NBPNP is New Brunswick’s Provincial Nominee Program.

Through the NBPNP, prospective immigrants with the skills and experience targeted by the province may receive a New Brunswick provincial nomination certificate. With this nomination, foreign nationals may then apply for Canadian permanent residence.

Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program (NLPNP)

Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada’s easternmost province may be one of the country’s best kept secrets.

The province consists of two distinct land masses: Labrador, which is connected to the mainland, and the island of Newfoundland. A large number of its residents live in the provincial capital of St. John’s, which enjoys a lively culture that draws heavily from its coastal environment.

The province has recently evolved into a significant economic force in the Canadian landscape due to a boom in energy and natural resources.

The NLPNP is Newfoundland and Labrador’s Provincial Nominee Program. Through this program, prospective immigrants with the skills and experience targeted by the province may receive a Newfoundland and Labrador provincial nomination.

Northwest Territories Nominee Program (NTNP)

Situated between the Yukon and Nunavut, the Northwest Territories (NWT) is the name given to one single expansive territory.

The Northwest Territories boasts acres upon acres of untouched forests and a population of just over 40,000 residents. The territory’s economy exploits its vast geological resources, including gold, diamonds, natural gas, and petroleum.

The capital city, Yellowknife, located on the shores of Great Slave Lake, is both a major industrial hub for workers in the region and a scenic town with abundant recreational opportunities.

Through the Northwest Territories’ Provincial Nominee Program (NTNP) program, prospective immigrants with the skills and experience targeted by the province may receive a Northwest Territories Provincial Nomination Certificate, which will allow that foreign national to apply for Canadian Permanent Residence.

Nova Scotia Nominee Program (NSNP)

Nova Scotia is a small Canadian province located in the Maritimes region of the country.

The province is composed of the Nova Scotia peninsula, Cape Breton Island, and over 3,000 smaller islands. Its capital city, Halifax, is known as a major centre for culture and the arts, as well as for its high standard of living. Nova Scotians are closely connected to the sea, and the province is renowned for its coastal beauty and delicious cuisine.

The NSNP is Nova Scotia’s Provincial Nominee Program. Through this program, prospective immigrants with the skills and experience targeted by the province may receive a Nova Scotia Provincial Nomination Certificate.

Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP)

Ontario is Canada’s most popular landing destination for immigrants from around the world.

As Canada’s most populous province, nearly 40 percent of Canadians call Ontario home. Ontario is also home to Canada’s capital city, Ottawa, and its largest city, Toronto. In many ways, Ontario is the center of Canada’s economic, social, and political life.

Ontario’s Provincial Nominee Program is called the Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP).

Through this program, prospective immigrants with the skills and experience targeted by the province may receive a provincial nomination from Ontario, after which they can apply for Canadian permanent residence with the Government of Canada.

Prince Edward Island Provincial Nominee Program (PEI PNP)

Prince Edward Island (PEI), which consists of the island itself and several surrounding isles, is Canada’s smallest province.

It is sometimes called “the birthplace of Canada” because of the Charlottetown conference, which led to the country’s formation. PEI is renowned not only for its lush farmland and beautiful coasts, but it is also home to a burgeoning economy centered on agriculture, tourism, and fishing.

The PEI PNP is Prince Edward Island’s Provincial Nominee Program. Through this program, prospective immigrants with the skills and experience targeted by the province may receive a Prince Edward Island Provincial Nomination Certificate, after which they can apply for Canadian permanent residence with the Government of Canada.

Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP)

Saskatchewan is home to one of the country’s most rapidly growing economies and populations, thanks largely to the arrival of immigrants from around the world.

Saskatchewan is one of the Prairie Provinces of Western Canada. Its economy is primarily based on agriculture and important natural resources industries like forestry and fishing. It boasts two major cities, Saskatoon and Regina, as well as vast expanses of pristine wilderness.

The SINP is Saskatchewan’s Provincial Nominee Program. Through this program, prospective immigrants with the skills and experience targeted by the province may receive a Saskatchewan provincial nomination certificate, after which they can apply for Canadian permanent residence with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC).

Yukon Nominee Program (YNP)

Located in the far northwest of Canada, Yukon has a fabled place in the country’s history.

Perhaps most famous for the Klondike Gold Rush of the late 1890s, Yukon today is home to approximately 30,000 people, living mostly in the capital of Whitehorse. Its economy is composed primarily of mining and tourism. The territory is an ideal place to settle for individuals who value strong communities and the great outdoors.

The Yukon Nominee Program (YNP) is the Yukon’s Provincial Nominee Program. Through this program, prospective immigrants with the skills and experience targeted by the territory may receive a Yukon Provincial Nomination Certificate, after which they can apply for Canadian permanent residence with the Government of Canada

How to apply for PNP:

  1. You need to meet the eligibility requirements of the province that nominates you.
  2. You can apply directly to that particular province or territory, when it is open.
  3. You can create an Express Entry profile and show the provinces and territories you’re interested in.
  4. If a province or territory sends you a “notification of interest” to your account, you can contact them directly.
  5. If you are invited to apply, you submit an electronic application to IRCC.
  6. You can create an Express entry profile, you will be directly picked by the province and send invitation to apply for permanent residence, and this is the right and most successful method.
Posted in Alberta, Canada, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Toronto, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Third Manitoba EOI draw pushes 2019 invitation total to 1526

Third Manitoba EOI draw pushes 2019 invitation total to 1526

Manitoba

Manitoba

February 15 draw issued 444 invitations to apply for a provincial nomination for permanent residence

Manitoba issued new invitations to apply for a provincial nomination for permanent residence on February 15 to eligible skilled workers and international students who have expressed their interest in immigrating to the province.

The draw was the province’s third of 2019 and issued 444 invitations to candidates in the Skilled Worker Overseas, Skilled Worker in Manitoba and International Education economic immigration streams.

Manitoba has now invited 1,526 immigration candidates to apply for a provincial nomination for permanent residence since the start of 2019.

The majority of Manitoba’s economic immigration streams operate on an Expression of Interest (EOI) basis. The first step in this process is the creation and completion of an EOI profile that outlines a candidate’s education, work experience, proficiency in English or French, among other factors, and awards a score based on the information provided.

The highest-ranked candidates are then issued Letters of Advice to Apply (LAAs) for a provincial nomination for permanent residence through regular draws from the pool of eligible candidates for each stream.

Skilled Worker Overseas

The February 15 draw saw a total of 268 invitations go to two groups of candidates in the Skilled Worker Overseas Stream. The lowest-ranked candidate in these two groups had a score of 570.

The first group consisted of candidates with a profile in the federal government’s Express Entry system, which manages the profiles of candidates in three of Canada’s main economic immigration categories — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, Federal Skilled Trades Class and the Canadian Experience Class.

In order to be considered for a provincial nomination from Manitoba, Express Entry candidates must register a separate expression of interest with the Manitoba Provincial Nominee Program (MPNP).

Express Entry candidates who receive an LAA and who apply for and receive a provincial nomination are awarded an additional 600 points toward their Express Entry ranking score and, as a result, are effectively guaranteed an invitation to apply for Canadian permanent residence in a subsequent draw from the Express Entry pool.

Express Entry candidates who received a Letter of Advice to Apply for a provincial nomination from Manitoba on February 15 were required to have a valid Express Entry ID and job seeker validation code, and at least six months of recent work experience in a profession on the province’s in-demand occupation list.

The second group of Skilled Worker Overseas candidates consisted of those with the following:

  • a close relative residing in Manitoba or past education or work experience in Manitoba;
  • at least six months of recent experience in a profession on Manitoba’s In-demand Occupations list; and
  • a minimum language proficiency of CLB/NCLC 5 unless work experience is primarily in a regulated occupation, in which case the minimum CLB/NCLC is 7, or a compulsory trade, in which case the minimum is CLB/NCLC 6.

Another group of 22 Skilled Worker Overseas candidates were issued LAAs through a Strategic Recruitment Initiative. These initiatives can include overseas recruitment missions conducted by the MPNP.

Skilled Worker in Manitoba and International Education Stream

The MPNP also issued 120 invitations to Skilled Worker in Manitoba candidates with scores as low as 574 in the February 15 draw.

The Skilled Worker in Manitoba Stream is for eligible qualified temporary foreign workers and international student graduates who are currently working in Manitoba and have been offered a permanent job with their Manitoba employer.

An additional 34 invitations went to International Education Stream candidates.

Created last year, this stream provides faster pathways to permanent residence for international graduates of Manitoba post-secondary institutions who have skills required by employers in the province.

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