Ontario revises CRS minimum rule for Human Capital Priorities Stream

Ontario revises CRS minimum rule for Human Capital Priorities Stream

Ontario revises CRS minimum rule for Human Capital Priorities Stream

Ontario revises CRS minimum rule for Human Capital Priorities Stream

Ontario revises CRS minimum rule for Human Capital Priorities Stream

Minimum score will now be ‘determined by the director’

Ontario has revised the minimum Comprehensive Ranking System score requirement for its Express Entry-linked Human Capital Priorities immigration stream.

Whereas candidates previously were required to have a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score of at least 400, the stream’s guidelines now say the minimum score will be “as determined by the director.”

A further update asks candidates to indicate their interest in immigrating to either Ontario or “all provinces and territories” when creating an Express Entry profile.

The Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP) did not immediately respond to a request from CIC News for more information regarding these updates.

The OINP has waived the CRS minimum of 400 in three draws so far this year, two of which targeted Express Entry candidates with a job offer in Ontario and another that targeted those with French language abilities of CLB 7 or higher.

For these draws, Ontario dropped the CRS minimum and even pushed it as low as 350 in its August 9 targeted job offer draw.

The Human Capital Priorities Stream (HCP) is one of the Ontario’s most active and popular immigration pathways. It allows the OINP to search the federal Express Entry pool for candidates who match the stream’s established eligibility criteria.

Ontario has issued a total of 3,534 Notifications of Interest to selected Express Entry candidates through the HCP in 2018.

Express Entry candidates who receive a Notification of Interest can then apply to Ontario for a provincial nomination.

The Express Entry system manages the profiles of candidates in the Federal Skilled Worker Class, Federal Skilled Trades Class and the Canadian Experience Class.

Express Entry candidates who receive a provincial nomination for permanent residence from Ontario are awarded an additional 600 points toward their CRS score, effectively guaranteeing them an Invitation to Apply (ITA) in a subsequent draw from the Express Entry pool.

In order to be considered for the HCP, the first step is to find out if you are eligible to enter a profile in the federal Express Entry pool.

Posted in Canada, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Ontario, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Vision for proposed Northern Ontario immigration pilot outlined

The vision for proposed Northern Ontario immigration pilot outlined

The vision for proposed Northern Ontario immigration pilot outlined

The vision for proposed Northern Ontario immigration pilot outlined

The vision for proposed Northern Ontario immigration pilot outlined

Leading advocate of project says ‘middle-skilled’ labour is needed in Ontario’s northern regions

The head of one of the main organizations pushing for an immigration pilot for Ontario’s northern regions has provided new details of his vision for the program.

Charles Cirtwill, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Northern Policy Institute, detailed a number of key issues that he said the pilot must address in a column published this week.

For one, Cirtwill said it is essential that the pilot reflect the fact labour needs in smaller, rural communities are typically different from those in urban centres.

“My colleagues at the Northern Policy Institute (NPI) have found that seven of the 10 jobs in demand in Northern Ontario, based on number of vacancies posted, were ‘middle-skilled’ jobs in National Occupational Classification codes C or D,” Cirtwill said.

Canada’s National Occupational Classification, or NOC, organizes more than 30,000 occupations according to skill level and skill type. Skill levels C and D include semi- and low-skilled occupations in the trades, primary and manufacturing industries, sales and services, and some clerical and assistant categories.

Cirtwill says the pilot must also recognize the fact that labour needs in Northern Ontario can vary from community to community — “some need truck drivers, others tourism staff, skilled trades or office support staff,” he wrote.

Accordingly, the pilot program should allow for a broad range of foreign labour while placing “a hard cap on any one specific job classification.”

‘1,500 new immigrants a year’

As to how many immigrants the proposed pilot should welcome on an annual basis, Cirtwill said the various regions that make up Northern Ontario need “at least 1,500 new immigrants a year to have a sustainable mix of working age population to dependents (under 19 and over 65).”

This target assumes full employment among current residents, including Northern Ontario’s Indigenous Peoples, he said.

Planners would also have to establish sub-targets to ensure that each region covered by the pilot receives its fair share of newcomers. This would ensure that Northern Ontario’s “Big Five” communities — North Bay, Sudbury, Timmins, Thunder Bay, and Sault Ste. Marie — aren’t the only beneficiaries of the pilot program, Cirtwill said.

Other key considerations are the project’s duration and the need for proper oversight and monitoring. A minimum of three to five years would allow for the collection of “sound data,” Cirtwill argued, adding that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) must prioritize “releasing better and more timely data.”

Cirtwill’s column follows meetings in August that brought together business and community leaders from Northern Ontario with Canada’s Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, Ahmed Hussen.

The Northern Policy Institute and others are hoping Hussen and IRCC will approve a pilot program for Ontario’s rural and remote regions along the lines of the Atlantic Immigration Pilot, which was introduced last year to fill skilled and semi-skilled labour shortages in Canada’s Atlantic Provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador.

At the time, Minister Hussen said his department is studying the possibility, but a better understanding of the region’s specific needs is required.

“Just like in Atlantic Canada, if we’re going to proceed with that, we want to have a program conceivably that is very much tailored to the local needs of the regions and also a program that is really designed by the stakeholders [in Northern Ontario], as opposed to the government in Ottawa,” Minister Hussen said..

Posted in Atlantic Canada, Business / Investor Visa, Canada, Canada Open Work Permit, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Quebec’s popular Immigrant Investor Program reopen from September 10

Quebec’s popular Immigrant Investor Program reopens September 10

Quebec’s popular Immigrant Investor Program reopen from September 10

Quebec’s popular Immigrant Investor Program reopen from September 10

Participants can obtain permanent residence through passive investment of $1.2 million

The Quebec Immigrant Investor Program will reopen September 10 for a total of 1,900 applications.

This typically popular program is the only provincial immigration stream that allows applicants to obtain permanent residence through a passive investment.

This means that candidates are only required to make an investment in Quebec for a five-year term, whereas many Canadian provinces have immigration streams for entrepreneurs that require candidates to actively run a business.

As a result, quotas for the Quebec Immigrant Investor Program (QIIP) generally fill quickly. A maximum of 1,235 applications will be accepted from China (including Hong Kong and Macau) during the intake period, which is scheduled to remain open until March 15, 2019.

Modified criteria

Next week’s opening will be the first since modifications to the program’s eligibility criteria took effect on August 2.

The main modifications include higher net asset and investment requirements, which have been raised to CAD $2 million and CAD $1.2 million, respectively.

The previous requirements were net assets of CAD $1.6 million and an investment of CAD $800,000.

The investment must be for a five-year term with a subsidiary of Investissement Quebec and the investment agreement must be made through a financial intermediary authorized to participate in the QIIP.

The investment of CAD $1.2 million is guaranteed by the Quebec government and will be returned in full after five years.

Other eligibility requirements include being over 18 years of age, having management experience, intending to settle in the province of Quebec and obtaining a passing score under Quebec’s points system.

To calculate your potential points under the QIIP scoring system, use the Quebec Immigrant Investor Program (QIIP) calculator.

Quebec’s two other business immigration programs, the Quebec Entrepreneur Program and the Quebec Self-Employed Worker Program, opened August 15 to new applications.

Posted in Business / Investor Visa, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Quebec, Visa and Immigration | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment