Quebec Immigration – Skilled Worker Points Calculator 2018

Quebec Immigration – Skilled Worker Points Calculator 2018

Quebec Immigration – Skilled Worker Points Calculator 2018

Quebec Immigration – Skilled Worker Points Calculator 2018

Calculate your Quebec Skilled Worker passing score below.

Quebec’s incoming Expression of Interest system will manage immigration to Quebec through its Quebec Skilled Worker Program.

According to the Government of Quebec, immigration candidates who are 18 years of age or older will be able to submit a profile into the new Expression of Interest system.

The Government of Quebec will issue invitations to apply for a Quebec Selection Certificate to certain candidates.

While the Government of Quebec has not yet specified the exact criteria that will be used to rank or invite eligible candidates, it has announced how points will be assigned for purposes of obtaining the required passing scores under the Quebec Skilled Worker points assessment grid.

The Quebec Immigration – Skilled Worker Points Calculator below can be used to help Quebec Skilled Worker Program candidates to determine if they meet the passing score.

Please note that this calculator is for information purposes only.

This BETA version of the Quebec Immigration – Skilled Worker Points Calculator 2018 is still undergoing improvements and updates. The scores generated are unofficial. Please contact us by email if you believe there was any error in the calculation of your score.

Disclaimer

Canadavisa.com makes every effort to ensure the quality of the information available in this Quebec Immigration – Skilled Worker Points Calculator 2018 (the Calculator). However, before relying on information contained in the Calculator, users should carefully evaluate its accuracy, completeness and relevance to their particular purpose. The information contained within the Calculator is provided for information purposes only and does not assess eligibility for the Quebec Skilled Worker Program. Nothing contained in the Calculator is to be used as professional advice and the Calculator is not a substitute for the advice of a lawyer. Users should contact a qualified Canadian immigration lawyer and get appropriate professional advice relevant to their particular circumstances before any action or decision is taken on the basis of any of the material provided on the Calculator. Canadavisa.com does not accept any liability for any loss or damage incurred by use of or reliance on the Calculator or the information contained therein and cannot guarantee and assumes no legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information.

About the Quebec Skilled Worker passing score:

A Quebec Skilled Worker Program candidate’s passing score is based on the Quebec Skilled Worker Program points grid, which assigns a maximum of 120 points based on nine factors:

  1. Education and training
  2. Skilled work experience
  3. Age
  4. Proficiency in French or English
  5. Stay and Family in Quebec
  6. Spouse/common-law partner characteristics
  7. Valid job offer
  8. Accompanying children
  9. Financial self-sufficiency

Candidate profiles that meet education and financial self-sufficiency points requirements are then screened according to Employability and Selection factors.

Profiles must meet the cut-off score of 43 points (or 52 points if accompanied by a spouse or common-law partner) under the specified Employability factors.

Profiles that meet the cut-off score requirement are then screened according to a series of Selection factors. A minimum passing score of 50 (59 if accompanied by a spouse or common-law partner) is required under the Selection factors in order to be considered for an invitation to apply for a Quebec Selection Certificate

Posted in Canada, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Quebec, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Tourism industry calls for improvements in immigration performance

Tourism industry calls for improvements in immigration performance

Tourism industry calls for improvements in immigration performance

Tourism industry calls for improvements in immigration performance

Major improvements are needed in Immigration New Zealand’s fiscal and operational management to avoid future cost blow-outs, Tourism Industry Aotearoa says.

INZ is proposing to increase immigration fees and levies by as much as 54%, as it seeks to recover a deficit of $50 million.

In its submission on the proposed increases, TIA says it is disappointing that efforts to improve INZ’s efficiency and find cost-savings have not yet materialised.

“We want to see INZ adopt more robust fiscal and planning management practices to avoid any repeat of its forecast $50 million deficit. It appears that international workers and visitors are being asked to pay for the agency’s inability to make efficiency gains,” TIA Chief Executive Chris Roberts says.

“This comes at the same time as the Government is proposing to introduce the Electronic Travel Authority which will create a new level of border security and should create efficiencies for INZ.”

Insufficient research has been undertaken to assess whether the fee increases would influence skilled migrants’ decisions to work in New Zealand. Although most of the proposed increases were not large in dollar terms, international evidence suggested that any increase could impact on the ability to fill skill shortages.

TIA accepts the principal of cost recovery for processing visas, but is strongly opposed to increasing the Border Clearance Levy to include INZ’s border services. The BCL is currently used to fund Customs and Ministry for Primary Industries activities at the border. The consultation paper says adding immigration is an option to be considered.

Having a secure border is a public good which should be funded, at least partially, from general taxation revenue. As the consultation document itself notes, ‘The Crown also contributes to the cost of running the immigration system, recognising that there are public benefits to New Zealanders from a secure border and a well-functioning labour market’.

“There should be no change to this approach,” Mr. Roberts says. “The current combination of immigration levies and a direct Crown contribution must continue.”

More investigation is needed by INZ, Customs and the Ministry for Primary Industries to identify where cost-savings can be achieved in border services.

Posted in Business / Investor Visa, Dependent Visa, Immigration, New Zealand, Tourist Visa, Visa and Immigration | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Zealand Annual net migration down 7,400 from a peak in 2017

New Zealand Annual net migration down 7,400 from a peak in 2017

New Zealand Annual net migration down 7,400 from a peak in 2017

New Zealand Annual net migration down 7,400 from a peak in 2017

New Zealand Annual net migration eased slightly to 65,000 in the June 2018 year, as fewer migrants arrived and more left, Stats NZ said today.

Migrant arrivals were 129,500 and migrant departures were 64,500.

Annual net migration for the June 2018 year was down 7,400 from a record high of 72,400 in the July 2017 year.

“An increase in migrants leaving, particularly non-New Zealand citizens, continued to be the key factor in lower annual net migration,” acting population insights senior manager Michelle Feyen said.

“A decrease in migrant arrivals also contributed, but net migration still remains high by historical standards.”

In the June 2018 year, non-New Zealand citizen migrant departures were up 21 percent from a year ago to 30,900, and up 1.2 percent from the May 2018 year.

Migrant arrivals dipped below 130,000 for the first time since the April 2017 year. Both New Zealand and non-New Zealand citizen migrant arrivals decreased for the June 2018 year.

More New Zealand citizens are leaving the country long term than returning. In the year ended June 2018, there was a net loss of 1,800 New Zealand citizens, partly offsetting the net gain of 66,800 non-New Zealand citizens.

New online tool

Tourism and migration data visualiser is Stats NZ’s new online tool for tourism and migration figures. Use this tool to easily create simple graphs showing international travel trends.

Estimating migration – classifying border crossings with incomplete travel histories

In the near future, Stats NZ will use an outcomes-based measure to formally measure migration. An outcomes-based measure is more accurate than the current intentions-based measure (see Outcomes versus intentions: Measuring migration based on travel histories). However, the outcomes-based measure requires 16 months of complete border-crossing information, resulting in a 17-month lag before final estimates can be released. Stats NZ is working towards producing a provisional measure of migration that will ensure a timelier statistic.

Results from work so far show that most border crossings can be classified before 16 months are up. The remaining records can be classified (to short-term visitor, short-term New Zealand resident traveler, or long-term migrant) based on other variables such as age, sex, visa type, and citizenship. This estimation has the potential to change so provisional data will be published with uncertainty intervals, and will be subject to revision as the outcomes of travelers become more certain.

Posted in Dependent Visa, Immigration, New Zealand, Tourist Visa, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment