How can you make entry into Canada as a permanent resident with the provincial nominee program

How can you make entry into Canada as a permanent resident with the provincial nominee program?

How can you make entry into Canada as a permanent resident with the provincial nominee program

How can you make entry into Canada as a permanent resident with the provincial nominee program

Every province or territory has its own conditions for the Provincial Nominee Program. To apply for this program, you have two different choices. You can either apply through the paper–based process also known as non-express entry streams or through the express entry process.

How does the provincial nominee program work?

Permitted employers nominate a potential worker under a process which is generally accelerated and was approved by the province long ago.

This nomination of a potential worker allows him to apply for a permanent residence in Canada which will proceed in a processing stream.

In the early stages, the applicants who are sponsored by the qualified employers may get temporary but renewable work permits which are processed outside Canada or sometimes at the ports of entry

 The applicants who have applied for permanent admission are generally first processed by the provincial authorities and then later by federal authorities who perform a screening based on medical security grounds.

The provincial nominee programs which are based on the skilled workers usually need an employer who would sponsor that application for entry into Canada. But this is not the case in provinces like Saskatchewan, Quebec and Manitoba. If this criterion is not met, the application is not given approval or sometimes passed over favouring the applications which have an employer sponsorship.

On the other hand, the employers who wish to be qualified under the Provincial Nominee Program must show efforts in hiring local Canadians and offer them with some competitive terms and some conditions based on employment that will be pertinent to a particular job.

Also, in order to get qualified as the successful sponsoring employee under the Provincial Nominee Program, the employee needs to comply with the skill level O, A or B under the National Occupation Classification. If not this then the employee must adhere to any pilot project which will be designed for a particular skill shortage recognised by the province.

In many cases, when people become qualified to get entry into Canada under the Provincial Nominee Program, they may also get a temporary allowance for work permit.

Importance of the provincial nominee program

The main importance of the Provincial Nominee Program lies in the fact that it is a fast option for entry into Canada as a permanent resident.

The applicants who have provincial nomination are awarded with an additional 600 points which are generally referred to as the Comprehensive Ranking System Points. The utility of these points is that they will place you at the front of the selection line when there is a draw.

Although a provincial nomination is no doubt helpful but it is not a requirement for an applicant to get an Invitation to Apply for being a permanent residence.

The Provincial Nominee Programs have grown to that extent that they consist of about one-quarter of the economic immigrants.

The Provincial Nominee Programs have led to the development of many smaller provinces like Manitoba by shifting the destination of newcomers in Canada.

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Foreign Workers in New Brunswick May Now Apply to Express Entry Labour Market Stream

Foreign Workers in New Brunswick May Now Apply to Express Entry Labour Market Stream

Foreign Workers in New Brunswick May Now Apply to Express Entry Labour Market Stream

Foreign Workers in New Brunswick May Now Apply to Express Entry Labour Market Stream

Foreign workers currently employed in the province of New Brunswick have a fresh opportunity to obtain Canadian permanent residence, after the provincial government reopened its Express Entry Labour Market stream (EELMS) to these workers only. This enhanced Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) stream is part of the New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program (NBPNP), through which the province welcomes new permanent residents who can settle quickly.

Previously, this stream was closed to all new applications. Prior to the stream’s closure, individuals who had attended a NBPNP information session, and workers eligible for the open category (which allowed certain IT workers to apply) — as well as candidates already working in New Brunswick — were eligible to apply, so long as they fulfilled the program criteria.

Candidates who are successful in obtaining a provincial nomination certificate from the NBPNP through this stream receive 600 additional points under the federal Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) and will be invited to apply for Canadian permanent residence in a subsequent draw from the Express Entry pool.

In order to be eligible for the NBPNP – EELMS, foreign workers in New Brunswick must:

Be between the ages of 22 and 55;

Have a profile in the federal Express Entry pool;

Be currently employed in New Brunswick in a skilled occupation (NOC 0, A or B level);

Have at least 12 months full-time (or an equal amount in part-time) paid skilled work experience in New Brunswick in the three years before the application is made, which cannot have been gained through self-employment or while the candidate was a full-time student (volunteer work, unpaid internships, co-op terms, etc. do not count) and which is in NOC level 0, A or B;

Demonstrate proficiency in each of the four language abilities (speaking, reading, writing, and listening) equivalent to or greater than Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 7. Language test results must be no more than two years old and must come from a designated agency: IELTS (General Training Test only) or CELPIP (General test only) for English, or TEF for French;

Have a completed Canadian secondary (high school) or post-secondary educational credential (at least one academic year in length) OR a completed foreign educational credential from a recognized institution or authority; and

Sign and submit a Commitment to Live and Work in New Brunswick form.

Aside from this pathway, foreign workers in New Brunswick may have other means of pursuing permanent resident status, including the new Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program (AIPP), as well as through Express Entry, without necessarily obtaining a NBPNP nomination certificate.

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Canada Abolishes Conditional Permanent Residence Provision for Spouses and Partners

Canada Abolishes Conditional Permanent Residence Provision for Spouses and Partners

Canada Abolishes Conditional Permanent Residence Provision for Spouses and Partners

Canada Abolishes Conditional Permanent Residence Provision for Spouses and Partners

Spouses and common-law partners sponsored to immigrate to Canada will no longer experience a period of conditional permanent resident status. Instead, they will have full permanent resident status upon landing. The removal of the conditional permanent residence provision was confirmed by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) on April 28, 2017.

By eliminating the condition, the Liberal government said that it was addressing concerns that vulnerable sponsored spouses or partners may stay in abusive relationships because they are afraid of losing their permanent resident status, even though an exception to the condition existed for those types of situations. Abuse may be physical, sexual, psychological, and/or financial.

The condition had originally been introduced by the previous Conservative government in October, 2012 as a means to deter people from seeking to immigrate to Canada through non-genuine relationships.

While the current government admits that cases of marriage fraud may exist, it also states that ‘the majority of relationships are genuine and most spousal sponsorship applications are made in good faith,’ adding that ‘eliminating conditional permanent residence upholds the Government’s commitment to family reunification and supports gender equality and combating gender violence.’

The elimination of the condition had been expected for some time. In its Forward Regulatory Plan released in October, 2016, IRCC stated its intention to ‘[change] those provisions with the objective of addressing concerns that have been identified, such as the vulnerability of sponsored spouses.’

Canada Abolishes Conditional Permanent Residence Provision for Spouses and Partners

Canada Abolishes Conditional Permanent Residence Provision for Spouses and Partners

At that time, IRCC stated that ‘On balance, the program integrity benefits of conditional permanent residence have not been shown to outweigh the risks to vulnerable sponsored spouses and partners subject to the two-year cohabitation requirement . . . The proposed repeal of conditional permanent residence recognises that the majority of relationships are genuine, and the majority of applications are made in good faith. Eliminating conditional permanent residence would facilitate family reunification, remove the potential increased vulnerability faced by abused and neglected spouses and partners, and support the Government’s commitment to combating gender-based violence.’

“The government’s action today, and over recent months, says to new immigrants and Canadians alike that they are trusted. It also reaffirms the government’s belief that the existing legislation is robust enough to be able to deal with any possible case of abuse without recourse to a conditional permanent residence provision,” says Attorney David Cohen.

“The safety and well-being of all residents of Canada is paramount, and by eliminating this provision, the government will allow more newcomers to settle and integrate, knowing that Canada is their long-term home. Overall, it helps to build a stronger society for all.”

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