Study Abroad in New Zealand programs

Study Abroad in New Zealand programs

Study Abroad in New Zealand programs

Study Abroad in New Zealand programs

Study Abroad in New Zealand programs

Study science and explore the unknown

Discover how the natural world works and gain the skills to meet the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century

Why study science in New Zealand?

High-quality education

Studying science in New Zealand combines a first-class academic education with practical, hands-on learning that teaches you to ask questions and think critically.

While you’re studying abroad you may be learning in labs, research centers, and field stations, from marine reserves to Scott Base in Antarctica. You’ll be taught by expert teachers, work in teams to research real-world problems, and gain globally-recognised qualifications.

Inspiring lifestyle

There’s no better place to discover the wonders of the natural world than New Zealand, with its wide open spaces and awe-inspiring landscapes.

New Zealand’s relaxed work/life balance gives you more time to explore the country during your overseas study experience. We have a friendly, inclusive and multicultural society, and are ranked the second most peaceful nation on Earth.

Work while you study

Working while studying can be a good way to gain New Zealand work experience and help support you while you’re studying abroad.

Student visa holders may be able to work up to 20 hours per week and full-time during scheduled holidays, depending on their program of study. Masters by research or Ph.D. students may work full-time throughout their studies.

You can find out more about working while studying on Immigration New Zealand’s Study + Work website.

Launch your career

Science graduates from New Zealand gain globally-recognised qualifications and the ability to think critically and creatively about challenging issues – ideal skills for the modern workplace.

Science graduates are highly sought-after by employers, who value capability skills such as flexibility, teamwork, and workplace-relevant English language abilities. Many science careers are on our skills shortages list, so you may be able to work here after graduating.

Study technology and develop the ideas that shape our world

High-quality education

New Zealand prepares you for your future in the booming technology sector with expert teaching, cutting-edge facilities and equipment, and globally-recognised qualifications.

Your study abroad experience will give you practical, hands-on learning and real-world experience, from creating a robot to designing a software system. You’ll develop analytical and creative thinking skills, and work in teams with other students and with industry to solve challenging problems.

Inspiring lifestyle

New Zealand’s relaxed work/life balance will give you time to travel and explore our natural environment, which ranges from stunning beaches to spectacular mountains featured in the Lord of the Rings films. We have a high standard of living and lots of open spaces.

You’ll be welcomed into a friendly, inclusive and multicultural society where you can study in safety – New Zealand is ranked the second most peaceful nation on Earth.

Work while you study

Working while studying can be a good way to gain New Zealand work experience and help support you while you’re studying abroad.

Student visa holders may be able to work up to 20 hours per week and full-time during scheduled holidays, depending on their program of study. Masters’ by research or Ph.D. students may work full-time throughout their studies.

You can find out more about working while studying on Immigration New Zealand’s Study + Work website.

Launch your career

International technology students who study abroad in New Zealand gain globally-recognised qualifications and highly transferable capability skills such as critical and creative thinking, flexibility, teamwork, time management and interpersonal skills.

Students also gain workplace-relevant English language abilities, learning to be effective in multicultural and Western work environments. The technology sector offers a diverse range of specializations, and global demand for technology graduates continues to rise.

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International graduate occupation and waiver requirements

International graduate occupation and waiver requirements

International graduate occupation and waiver requirements

International graduate occupation and waiver requirements

International graduates of South Australia have access to a larger list of occupations for state nomination and can access waivers.

You can access:

State Nominated Occupation List (including Special Conditions apply occupations)

Supplementary Skilled List occupations

State nomination for the Permanent 190 visa for occupations listed as ‘Offshore applicants Provisional 489 visa only’

Requirements for these occupations are detailed below.

General requirements

9.1 If you are an international graduate of South Australia, you must meet the following general requirements:

9.1.1 If you are applying as an international graduate of South Australia, you must meet the same state nomination requirements for commitment to the state, age, skills assessment, work experience, English and financial capacity.  You may be able to access waivers or exemptions in relation to work experience, English, and financial capacity.  Please check the requirements listed under the relevant headings.

9.1.2 Your South Australian qualification must be in the same field as your nominated occupation.

9.1.3 Your South Australian qualification must be CRICOS registered with a minimum duration of one academic year (CRICOS registered for a minimum of 46 weeks).

9.1.4 If any of your studies were undertaken outside of South Australia, a minimum of 50% of your qualification must have been completed in South Australia.

9.1.5 For skilled work experience to be considered, it must be in a skilled occupation listed on the State Nominated Occupation Lists.

9.1.6 If your occupation is listed as requiring additional work experience in the field (for example, 2-3 years work experience in the field), you must be currently working in your nominated occupation or closely related occupation in South Australia (minimum 20 hours per week).Some of these occupations require you to be currently working for the last 12 months in South Australia in your nominated or closely related occupation (minimum 20 hours per week) post-graduation. See the Lists of State Nominated Occupations for further details.

9.1.7 Immigration SA is able to offer a limited number of nominations for occupations that appear as special conditions or on the Supplementary Skilled List. Planning levels apply to all occupations and availability is subject to change. Priority will be given to applicants based on length of employment in South Australia.

Supplementary Skilled List and Special Conditions Occupations

9.2 Access to Supplementary Skilled List and occupations with Special Conditions for South Australian international graduates have been aligned so they are the same for both lists. Requirements are based on the qualification you have completed in South Australia.

You can access Supplementary Skilled List and Special Conditions Apply occupations if you meet the following requirements:

9.2.1 If you are currently residing in South Australia, you can access these occupations if you have completed a Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification (for example, Diploma or Certificate) or higher in South Australia.

9.2.2 If you are currently residing offshore, you can access these occupations if you have completed a Bachelor degree or higher in South Australia.

Work experience requirement for Supplementary Skilled List and Special Conditions Apply occupations

9.2.3 The work experience requirement that applies to you will depend on the qualification you have completed in South Australia.

Vocational Education and Training (VET) Certificate or Diploma completed in South Australia

Currently working in your nominated or closely related occupation (for a minimum 20 hours per week) for the last:

  • 6 months in a country region of South Australia.

(or)

  • 12 months in Greater Adelaide.

To be considered to be working in a country region of South Australia, you must be employed and residing in an area outside of Greater Adelaide. View the full list of eligible country region postcodes.  View our interactive map of South Australia.

Bachelor Degree or higher completed in South Australia

  • Currently working in a skilled occupation in South Australia (minimum 20 hours per week)

(OR)

  • Have met the general work experience requirement as per nomination requirement 5. If you are claiming Australian work experience, 6 months of this must be South Australian work experience

If your occupation requires 2 – 3 years work experience in the field, you must be currently working in your nominated or closely related occupation. Some of these occupations require you to be currently working for the last 12 months in South Australia in your nominated or closely related occupation (minimum 20 hours per week) post-graduation (see 9.1.6 above).

If you are a high performing graduate currently residing in South Australia, you may be able to access a work experience waiver. See work experience waiver information below (9.4).

Eligibility guide for South Australian graduates

The following table provides a guide if you meet supplementary skilled list and special conditions apply requirements based on where you are residing and your maximum level of South Australian gained qualification.  Please refer to the full requirements page to check your eligibility.

Residency location Highest qualification completed in South Australia Can I apply for Supplementary Skilled List and Special Conditions occupations?
Currently residing in South Australia Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification (diploma or certificate) Yes – you must be currently working 12 months or more in your field in South Australia (or currently working 6 months or more in your field in a country region of South Australia).
Higher Education qualification (Bachelor Degree or higher) Yes – meet the general work experience requirement or be currently employed in a skilled occupation in South Australia*.
Currently residing interstate Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification (diploma or certificate) No
Higher Education qualification (Bachelor Degree or higher) No
Currently residing offshore (outside Australia) Vocational Education and Training (VET) qualification (diploma or certificate) No
Higher Education qualification (Bachelor Degree or higher) Yes – meet the general work experience requirement.  If relying on Australian work experience 6 months must have been achieved in South Australia.

If the occupation is listed as requiring additional work experience in the field (for example, 2-3 years work experience in the field), you must meet this requirement or be currently working in the nominated occupation or closely related occupation in South Australia (minimum 20 hours per week).Some of these occupations require you to be currently working for the last 12 months in South Australia in your nominated or closely related occupation (minimum 20 hours per week) post-graduation.

Waivers and exemptions

International graduates of South Australia with a positive skills assessment for their skilled occupation, currently working in South Australia who do not meet all of the state nomination requirements, could still be eligible for state nomination.

Exemptions or waivers will be provided if you are an international graduate of South Australia and you meet the requirements under the following headings at the bottom of this page:

  • Work experience waiver
  • Financial requirement waiver
  • English language exemption

Work experience waiver and exemptions

Please note: you will still need to meet any work experience requirements as specified by the skills assessing authority for your nominated occupation.

9.4 You can access a work experience waiver for both occupation lists if you meet one of the following high performing graduate categories. You will need to be currently residing in South Australia and have completed one of the following qualifications from a South Australian public university (within the last two years) with the required Grade Point Average (GPA) listed below:

  • Completed a Ph.D. or Masters by Research
  • GPA of 6.0 or above in a Bachelor Degree
  • First Class Honours in a dedicated Honours year (following completion of a Bachelor degree in South Australia)
  • GPA of 6.0 or above in Masters by Coursework degree (following completion of a Bachelor degree in South Australia).

The three South Australian public universities are Flinders University, the University of Adelaide and the University of South Australia.

If you are a high performing graduate from a private higher education provider in South Australia, further information is available here.

9.5 If you are an international graduate of South Australia, you can access a work experience waiver if you meet one of the requirements below.

9.5.1 Your occupation is listed as ‘available or low availability’*, you are residing in South Australia and you meet one of the following:

  • Proficient English in each score OR
  • Minimum overall score of IELTS 7.5 or PTE Academic 73 or TOEFL iBT 102 or CAE 191 OR
  • Passport holder and citizen of the United States, United Kingdom, New Zealand, Canada or Ireland OR
  • Currently working in a skilled occupation in South Australia (minimum 20 hours per week).

Additional work experience required: If your occupation requires 2 – 3 years work experience in the field, you must be currently working in your nominated or closely related occupation in South Australia (minimum 20 hours per week) some of these occupations require you to be currently working for the last 12 months in South Australia in your nominated or closely related occupation (minimum 20 hours per week) post-graduation – see 9.1.6.

Health and Education professionals: Higher English scores apply if registration is required for your occupation or alternatively, you can show evidence of your current registration to practice in South Australia.

Financial requirement waiver

9.6 If you are an Australian international graduate, you can claim financial support from your parents.  Your parents will need to complete the Financial Capacity Declaration to meet this requirement.

English language exemption

9.7 High performing graduates residing in South Australia are exempt from state nomination English requirements for all occupation lists (including Supplementary Skilled List occupations or Special conditions apply occupations).  You must still meet the minimum English requirement listed under 9.9 below.

9.8 International graduates of South Australia who are currently working in a skilled occupation in South Australia (minimum 20 hours per week) are exempt from the Immigration SA state nomination English requirement for your occupation. You must still meet the minimum English requirement listed under 9.9 below.

9.9 You must still meet the minimum Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) requirement of ‘competent’ English.

9.10 Health and Education professionals requiring registration will need to upload evidence of current registration to practice in South Australia.

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Express Entry Helping to Address Canada’s Need for IT Workers

Express Entry Helping to Address Canada’s Need for IT Workers

Express Entry Helping to Address Canada’s Need for IT Workers

Express Entry Helping to Address Canada’s Need for IT Workers

According to a report published last year by the Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC), Canada needs 182,000 new workers in the Information Technology (IT) sector by 2019. Fortunately for Canadian employers and international workers alike, over the past year, Canada’s Express Entry immigration system has helped to address this labor shortage.

Critically, provinces across Canada have recognized their need for skilled IT personnel and have used their ‘enhanced’ Express Entry-aligned Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) streams to select IT workers specifically. These provincial efforts are in addition to the federal government’s objective of inviting more Express Entry candidates based on their strong human capital factors. As a result, the number of candidates with IT work experience being invited to apply has increased over time.

In addition, the federal government recently launched a new initiative aimed at IT workers and employers known as the Global Talent Stream. This initiative aims to help innovative companies grow by ensuring they can access the highly skilled talent they need quickly. Workers who arrive in Canada under the Global Talent Stream may build up Canadian work experience — a highly-valued factor under Express Entry — and subsequently immigrate to Canada permanently.

This IT immigration report looks at how IT workers have benefited from immigration trends over the past 12 months.

About Express Entry and provincial nomination

Individuals eligible to immigrate to Canada through a federal economic program can submit a profile into the Express Entry pool, where they are ranked against each other according to a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS). The government of Canada issues Invitations to Apply (ITAs) for Canadian permanent residence to the highest-ranked candidates on a priority basis through draws from the pool. If a candidate obtains a provincial nomination, 600 CRS points are awarded and that candidate is prioritized for an ITA in a subsequent draw from the pool.

In order to apply for a provincial nomination, candidates must first create an Express Entry profile. Provinces use their enhanced PNP streams in different ways. For example, Nova Scotia and Saskatchewan open their doors on a first-come, first-served basis to candidates in specific occupations, whereas Ontario searches for candidates in the pool before issuing a provincial Notification of Interest (NOI).

Provinces looking for IT workers

Certain provinces, using their enhanced PNP streams, are explicitly seeking out IT workers in the Express Entry pool

Example 1: Ontario

Ontario, which is a particularly popular destination for new permanent residents, has a Human Capital Priorities (HCP) stream that only selects eligible candidates in the Express Entry pool. Applications under this stream are submitted through the Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP).

On June 28, the government of Ontario made an announcement that it was seeking Information and Communications Technology (ICT) professionals. While one of the usual requirements of the HCP stream is that candidates must have a CRS score of 400 or above, the announcement clarified that for these ICT occupation-specific searches, Ontario lowered the required minimum CRS score below 400. Candidates with work experience in any of the following National Occupational Classification (NOC) codes were eligible to receive an NOI, even if they scored less than 400 points under the CRS.

NOC 0131: Telecommunication Carriers Managers

NOC 0213: Computer and Information Systems Managers

NOC 2133: Electrical and Electronics Engineers

NOC 2147: Computer Engineers (Except Software Engineers and Designers)

NOC 2171: Information Systems Analysts and Consultants

NOC 2172: Database Analysts and Data Administrators

NOC 2173: Software Engineers and Designers

NOC 2174: Computer Programmers and Interactive Media Developers

NOC 2175: Web Designers and Developers

NOC 2241: Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technologists and Technicians

NOC 2281: Computer Network Technicians

NOC 2282: User Support Technicians

NOC 2283: Systems Testing Technicians

NOC 5224: Broadcast Technicians

NOC 5241: Graphic Designers and Illustrators

Though the government of Ontario has not stated if or when it may prioritize IT workers under the HCP stream again, it is notable that the ICTC report cited at the beginning of this article states that ‘By 2019, cumulative hiring requirements for ICT talent are expected to be over 52,700 in the greater Toronto area, over 9,700 in Ottawa-Gatineau, over 3,800 in the Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo region, and over 9,900 in rest of Ontario.’

Consequently, it may be the case that Ontario uses the HCP stream again to prioritize IT, workers.

Example 2: Nova Scotia

Halifax, the capital and largest city in Nova Scotia, was recently titled ‘Canada’s fifth-biggest tech hub’ by CTV News. This is no mean feat, considering that Halifax is the 13th largest metropolitan area in Canada.

Of the 16 occupations on Nova Scotia’s list of targeted opportunity occupations for its Nova Scotia Demand: Express Entry stream, four are IT occupations:

NOC 2171: Information systems analysts and consultants

NOC 2174: Computer programmers and interactive media development

NOC 2281: Computer network technicians

NOC 2282: User support technicians

This Express Entry-aligned stream most recently opened last week on July 5, reaching its intake limit within hours. However, the government of Nova Scotia expects this stream to open and close over the next year.

Candidates with experience in one of these occupations improve their chances of successfully submitting an application to the Nova Scotia Office of Immigration if they prepare their documents and forms in advance and stay alerted to news from Nova Scotia regarding this stream.

Example 3: Saskatchewan

Earlier this month, the government of Saskatchewan began to let nominees and other stakeholders know that a new tech careers web page is now available, showing the range of tech-related jobs in the province, which is located in Western Canada. Saskatchewan’s Labour Demand Outlook for 2016 to 2020 shows that salaries for IT professions are expected to be high.

Since July 2016, the International Skilled Worker – Express Entry sub-category of the Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP) has opened on five occasions. This sub-category allows eligible Express Entry candidates with experience in an in-demand occupation to submit an application to the SINP. No job offer is required, and applications are received on a first-come, first-served basis.

For the most recent intake, which ran from May 16 to May 24, 2017, no IT occupations were included on the list. However, for the previous intake periods, Computer and Information Systems Managers (NOC 0213) and Information Systems Analysts and Consultants (NOC 2171) were included.

Saskatchewan’s list of in-demand occupations is subject to change, and Express Entry candidates across the IT professions may benefit in the future, as they have done so in the past.

Example 4: New Brunswick

This time last year New Brunswick, located in Atlantic Canada, was inviting certain IT professionals to submit their resume through the ‘Open Category’ of the New Brunswick Provincial Nominee Program (NBPNP) Express Entry Labour Market Stream, before potentially applying for provincial nomination under the program.

New Brunswick was looking for newcomers in the following occupations:

NOC 2171: Information systems analysts and consultants

NOC 2172: Database analysts and data administrators

NOC 2174: Computer programmers and interactive media developers

NOC 2175: Web designers and developers

NOC 2281: Computer network technicians

Though this category stopped receiving applications on July 15, 2016, it may reopen in the future, either with the above list of occupations or with some other variation.

Express Entry Changes Benefit IT Candidates

When IRCC released its year-end report for 2016, statistics showed that invited candidates by profession had shifted towards higher-skilled professions, principally in IT.

TOP OCCUPATIONS BY ITAS ISSUED 2016 RANK 2015 RANK
NOC 2171 – Information Systems Analysts and Consultants 1 3
NOC 2173 – Software Engineers 2 4
NOC 2174 – Computer Programmers and Interactive Media Developers 3 5
NOC 6322 – Cooks 4 2
NOC 6311 – Food Service Supervisors 5 1
NOC 4011 – University Professors and Lecturers 6 6
NOC 5241 – Graphic Designers and Illustrators 7 8
NOC 1123 – Professional Occupations in Advertising, Marketing, and Public relations 8 Not in top 10
NOC 1111 – Financial Auditors and Accountants 9 9
NOC 6211 – Retail Sales Supervisors 10 7
NOC 1112 – Financial and Investment Analysts Not in 10 10

In 2016, candidates working as IT professionals were the largest group of invited candidates. According to the IRCC report, ‘In September 2016, when invitation round sizes began to grow, candidates with higher human capital but without a valid job offer, such as those in occupation groups NOC 11, 21 and 40, were invited in greater numbers. Since November 19, 2016, this trend has become even more pronounced.’ As the table above shows, many IT professions come under NOC group 21.

Because the improvements that came into effect last November brought a change in the value of a job offer under the CRS — from 600 points to either 50 or 200 points, depending on the position offered — many candidates without a job offer improved their ranking. This placed more of these candidates in line to receive an ITA, with or without a provincial nomination or a job offer.

Moreover, so far 2017 has seen more candidates invited than ever before. At the time of writing, a total of 54,487 ITAs has been issued this year. This number more than triples the 15,286 ITAs issued over the first half of 2016, and far surpasses the total number issued in the whole of last year.

“Taking into account the rapid increase in ITAs issued, the corresponding decrease in CRS cut-off thresholds, the changes made last November, and the fact that provinces are actively seeking IT personnel, the present and the future looks rosy for Express Entry candidates with IT experience,” says Attorney David Cohen.

Time management is key

Across all, the provincial and federal programs mentioned in this article, time management, and preparedness are key elements.

Let’s take a couple of hypothetical examples.

Alphonso, a computer programmer, created an Express Entry profile as he was eligible under the Federal Skilled Worker Class. He was awarded 388 CRS points. When Ontario targeted IT professionals in the pool last month, Alphonso received an NOI, allowing him to apply under the OINP. As he had prepared most of his documents in advance in case he received an ITA from IRCC, he unexpectedly gained from Ontario’s new strategy. As a result, this month he was able to apply to the OINP.

Once an NOI is issued, the invited candidate has six months to register on Ontario’s online application system and submit the application. Once registered, the candidate has 14 days to submit the application. However, Alphonso moved quickly with his application after noting that Ontario encourages invited candidates to register a profile and submit an application on their e-Filing Portal as soon as possible in order to ensure that their application is received before Ontario’s nomination allocation is fulfilled. Having submitted a complete application, Alphonso can look forward to receiving 600 additional CRS points and an ITA for permanent residence. And because he is prepared, he is well-positioned to submit his e-application to IRCC once he gets an ITA; IRCC allows 90 days for this application to be submitted, and aims to process complete applications within six months.

Another candidate, Alisha, was also invited by Ontario under the HCP stream. Alisha had 411 CRS points. However, she adopted a wait-and-see approach, in case the CRS cut-off threshold dipped to 411, allowing her to submit an application for permanent residence without first obtaining a provincial nomination. This meant that she waited deep into the allotted six-month window to register on Ontario’s online system. In doing so, she runs the risk of her application not being processed to completion by Ontario. An NOI does not guarantee a candidate registration in the OINP e-Filing Portal, and candidates who act quickly are more likely to successfully obtain a provincial nomination.

Other candidates benefit from proactive time management. Faisal, an information systems analyst, had noticed that his occupation was on the targeted opportunity occupations list for the Nova Scotia Demand: Express Entry stream. When that stream opened last week, Faisal was ready to submit a complete application. He did so with a couple of hours of the stream opening and, as a result, his application for a provincial nomination in Nova Scotia is currently in processing.

The smart economy needs a smart approach

“Decades ago, and even not that long ago, Canada’s economy was built around manufacturing and agriculture. More recently, however, things have shifted more towards IT and tech,” says Attorney David Cohen. “Canada’s economic immigration system is built around input from stakeholders, including the business community and employers. Their voice is clear — they need skilled workers who have the knowledge and experience to assimilate into the smart economy.

Express Entry candidates are in a particularly strong position. They are eligible under one of the federal economic programs, they are visible to provinces and employers alike, and they are in a position to improve their score and ranking in the pool. As the main driver of economic immigration to Canada, Express Entry provides a wonderful opportunity for individuals and families looking to build lives and careers in Canada.

“Changes and trends over the last 12 months show that more and more IT professionals and their families are benefiting from the system. I would encourage anyone in this sector, as well as others, to make sure that they are in the pool, prepared, and knowledgeable about the provincial nominee programs and how they operate.”

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