Saskatchewan Express Entry Sub-Category Reopens With Expanded Occupations List

Saskatchewan Express Entry Sub-Category Reopens With Expanded Occupations List

Saskatchewan Express Entry Sub-Category Reopens With Expanded Occupations List

Saskatchewan Express Entry Sub-Category Reopens With Expanded Occupations List

The International Skilled Worker – Express Entry sub-category of the Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP) has reopened with an expanded list of 43 in-demand occupations. This sub-category is aligned with Canada’s Express Entry immigration selection system.

Eligible candidates in the Express Entry pool with work experience in one of these occupations may be able to submit an application for a provincial nomination under the SINP, resulting in 600 additional Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) points being awarded and an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residence being issued during a subsequent draw from the pool.

The SINP International Skilled Worker – Express Entry sub-category operates on a first-come, first-served basis, and applicants do not need a job offer in order to apply.

Up to 600 new applications will be accepted during this intake period.

The new in-demand occupations list

Of the 43 in-demand occupations on the updated list, 20 occupations do not require any specific professional licensure. The other 23 occupations do require some form of professional licensure.

The previous list included 17 occupations. Therefore, some candidates in the Express Entry pool who were not previously eligible to apply to the SINP may now be eligible to do so.

No licensure required

NOC OCCUPATION
0124 Advertising, marketing, and public relations managers
0423 Managers in social, community and correctional services
1112 Financial and investment analysts
1122 Managers in Professional occupations in business management consulting
1123 Professional occupations in advertising, marketing, and public relations
2211 Chemical technologists and technicians
2121 Biologists and related scientists
2123 Agricultural representatives, consultants, and specialists
2225 Landscape and horticulture technicians and specialists
2231 Civil engineering technologists and technicians
2241 Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians
2242 Electronic service technicians (household and business equipment)
2243 Industrial instrument technicians and mechanics
2253 Drafting technologists and technicians
0714 Facility operation and maintenance managers
0811 Managers in natural resources production and fishing
0821 Managers in agriculture
0911 Manufacturing managers
0912 Utilities managers

Licensure required

NOC OCCUPATION SINP REQUIREMENTS RELATED TO PROFESSIONAL STATUS OR LICENSURE
0211 Engineering managers Provide documentation from the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS) showing your Engineer-in-Training membership; or a letter from APEGS indicating that you have been assigned Confirmatory Exams.
2131 Civil engineers Provide documentation from the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS) showing your Engineer-in-Training membership; or a letter from APEGS indicating that you have been assigned Confirmatory Exams.
2132 Mechanical engineers Provide documentation from the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS) showing your Engineer-in-Training membership; or a letter from APEGS indicating that you have been assigned Confirmatory Exams.
2133 Electrical and electronics engineers Provide documentation from the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS) showing your Engineer-in-Training membership; or a letter from APEGS indicating that you have been assigned Confirmatory Exams.
2141 Industrial and manufacturing engineers Provide documentation from the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS) showing your Engineer-in-Training membership; or a letter from APEGS indicating that you have been assigned Confirmatory Exams.
2147 Computer engineers (except software engineers and designers) Provide documentation from the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS) showing your Engineer-in-Training membership; or a letter from APEGS indicating that you have been assigned Confirmatory Exams.
2151 Architects Provide your “Academic Certification” documentation from the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB).

Or

Documentation from the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB) showing your acceptance into the Broadly Experienced Foreign Architect (BEFA) program including an invitation to apply to the self-assessment phase (2nd step).

2154 Land surveyors Provide documentation from the Canadian Board of Examiners for Professional Surveyors (CBEPS) showing your “Candidate status” and eligibility to write the CBEPS candidate examinations.
2173 Software engineers and designers Provide documentation from the Canadian Association of Information Technology Professionals (CIPS) showing your:

·         Candidate Membership as an Associate Information Technology Professional (AITP); or,

·         Certified Membership as an Information Systems Professional (I.S.P); or,

·         Certified Membership as an Information Technology Certified Professional of Canada (ITCP).

For more information, visit the provincial regulator the Canadian Association of Information Technology Professionals (CIPS).

2175 Web designers and developer Provide documentation from the Canadian Association of Information Technology Professionals (CIPS) showing your:

·         Candidate Membership as an Associate Information Technology Professional (AITP); or,

·         Certified Membership as an Information Systems Professional (I.S.P); or,

·         Certified Membership as an Information Technology Certified Professional of Canada (ITCP).

For more information, visit the provincial regulator the Canadian Association of Information Technology Professionals (CIPS).

4151 Psychologists Provide documentation from the Saskatchewan College of Psychologists showing your eligibility for provisional licensure.
4212 Social and community service workers Provide your assessment of equivalency letter from the Canadian Association of Social Workers showing your foreign credential is equivalent to a Canadian Bachelor or Masters of Social Work.
4214 Early childhood educators and assistants Provide documentation from the Ministry of Education showing your eligibility for Early Childhood Educator Certification.
3211 Medical laboratory technologists Provide a copy of your valid licensure (temporary or provisional) from the Saskatchewan Society of Medical Laboratory Technologists.
3216 Medical sonographers Provide documentation from Sonography Canada showing your eligibility to challenge their qualifying examinations OR Provide your Examination Confirmation Letter (ECL) or proof of Sonography Certification from the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS).Note: ARDMS examinations can be written in various testing centers worldwide through Pearson VUE.
6331 Meat cutters As per Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Express Entry requirements, Express Entry applicants will need to provide a certificate of qualification from the Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC), which requires a trade qualified assessment (step 1) and requires individuals to write exams in Saskatchewan (step 2).
7231 Machinists As per Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Express Entry requirements, Express Entry applicants will need to provide a certificate of qualification from the Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC), which requires a trade qualified assessment (step 1) and requires individuals to write exams in Saskatchewan (step 2).
7272 Cabinetmakers As per Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Express Entry requirements, Express Entry applicants will need to provide a certificate of qualification from the Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC), which requires a trade qualified assessment (step 1) and requires individuals to write exams in Saskatchewan (step 2).
7311 Industrial mechanics As per Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Express Entry requirements, Express Entry applicants will need to provide a certificate of qualification from the Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC), which requires a trade qualified assessment (step 1) and requires individuals to write exams in Saskatchewan (step 2).
7312 Heavy-duty equipment mechanics As per Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Express Entry requirements, Express Entry applicants will need to provide a certificate of qualification from the Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC), which requires a trade qualified assessment (step 1) and requires individuals to write exams in Saskatchewan (step 2).
7321 Automotive service technicians, truck and bus mechanics As per Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Express Entry requirements, Express Entry applicants will need to provide a certificate of qualification from the Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC), which requires a trade qualified assessment (step 1) and requires individuals to write exams in Saskatchewan (step 2).
7322 Motor vehicle body repairers As per Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Express Entry requirements, Express Entry applicants will need to provide a certificate of qualification from the Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC), which requires a trade qualified assessment (step 1) and requires individuals to write exams in Saskatchewan (step 2).
7237 Welders As per Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s Express Entry requirements, Express Entry applicants will need to provide a certificate of qualification from the Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC), which requires a trade qualified assessment (step 1) and requires individuals to write exams in Saskatchewan (step 2).

Minimum Eligibility Requirements

In order to be eligible for the SINP’s International Skilled Worker – Saskatchewan Express Entry sub-category, candidates must:

Have proof of legal status, if currently residing in Canada;

Have an Express Entry Profile Number and Job Seeker Validation Code;

Score a minimum of 60 points out of 100 on the SINP point assessment grid.

Provide language test results from a designated testing agency that match the language level declared in the Express Entry profile;

Have completed at least one year of post-secondary education or training which is comparable to the Canadian education system and which has resulted in a degree, diploma, or certificate;

Have a minimum level of work experience related to their field of education or training in a highly skilled occupation (NOC 0, A, or B) that is considered to be in-demand in Saskatchewan (See in-demand occupations list above);

Have at least one of the following in the field of education or training occupation:

One year work experience in the past 10 years in a skilled profession (non-trades);

Two years work experience in a skilled trade in the past five years; or

Twelve months work experience in Canada in the past three years (trades and non-trades).

Obtain proof of eligibility for Saskatchewan licensure if their profession is regulated in Saskatchewan and requires mandatory (compulsory) certification or licensing; and

Have proof of sufficient settlement funds and a settlement plan;

Opportunity

“The greatly expanded list of in-demand occupations for this popular provincial immigration shows how things can change,” says Attorney David Cohen.

“Candidates in the Express Entry pool who are on the lookout for opportunities to increase their score under the Comprehensive Ranking System would be well advised to have documentation prepared because, as this reopening shows, an opportunity to apply to a provincial program could present itself at a moment’s notice.

“Such opportunities can be the difference in a person or family succeeding in their goal of immigrating to Canada.”

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Employers will be Required to Invite Applicants under new Job Match Service

Employers will be Required to Invite Applicants under new Job Match Service

Employers will be Required to Invite Applicants under new Job Match Service

Employers will be Required to Invite Applicants under new Job Match Service

As of August 28, there will be an additional step for Canadian employers wishing to hire through the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP). A new rating system will match workers registered in the Canada Job Bank with advertised positions, and employers will be required to invite candidates who have a certain number of stars in relation to the position.

The government of Canada calls this new feature its Job Match service, and the change affects both high-wage and low-wage Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) applications. Employers hiring through the TFWP must first obtain a positive LMIA before a foreign worker may be hired for the position. The issuance of an LMIA serves as proof that no Canadian citizen or permanent resident was ready, willing and able to perform the job.

The Job Match services will allow employers to see anonymous profiles of registered job seekers. These profiles correspond to the skills and job requirements stated in an employer’s job posting. Each match will be rated under a system of one to five stars. The more stars received by the job seeker for the position, the greater his or her compatibility with the position.

Not all foreign workers require an LMIA. LMIA-exempt hiring situations are managed under the International Mobility Program (IMP), a broad category that includes initiatives such as the Intra-Company transfer program and recruitment through NAFTA, among others.

LMIA advertising requirements

Unless there is a way for an employer to hire a foreign worker under the IMP, and unless otherwise exempt from advertising in the preliminary process of obtaining an LMIA, employers are required to adhere to certain advertising requirements before applying for an LMIA.

As of August 28, employers, irrespective of province or territory, will be required to advertise on Job Bank and conduct at least two additional methods of recruitment that are consistent with the occupation. Employers from a province or territory with a provincial or territorial job board must use Job Bank, but may also use the provincial or territorial job board as one of the additional recruitment methods.

High-wage and low-wage positions

The LMIA process is different depending on whether the position is classified as “high-wage” or “low-wage”. Jobs in which the employee is to be paid less than the provincial/territorial median wage for the occupation are considered low-wage, while those to be paid at or above the median are considered high-wage.

Effective August 28, employers hiring in a high-wage scenario will be required to invite all job seekers matched within the first 30 days of the job advertisement on Job Bank to apply for the position if they are rated four stars or more.

Employers hiring in a low-wage scenario will be required to invite all job seekers matched within the first 30 days of the job advertisement on Job Bank to apply for the position if they are rated two stars or more.

What next?

At this time, Service Canada (the government department overseeing the LMIA process) has not stated whether employers will be required to interview job candidates who apply for the position having been invited to do so by the employer under the new system.

It should be noted that employers in certain sectors and in certain parts of the country may be exempt from the LMIA advertising requirements entirely. For example, the recently-launched Global Talent Stream allows employers in the IT/tech sector to bypass the advertising requirements and bring in workers within a matter of weeks. In addition, the province of Quebec has a facilitated list of occupations that do not require employers to advertise.

Further, some workers may obtain a work permit if their employment in Canada is deemed to bring “significant social or cultural benefit” to the country.

Other positions may not necessarily be exempt but may have variations to the LMIA advertising requirements.

Some of these options, in addition to options under the IMP, may be reviewed by employers before they embark on the process of securing an LMIA.

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Second Quarter of 2017 Sets New Express Entry Records

Second Quarter of 2017 Sets New Express Entry Records

Second Quarter of 2017 Sets New Express Entry Records

Second Quarter of 2017 Sets New Express Entry Records

While 2017 has already been statistically the biggest year ever for Canada’s Express Entry immigration selection system, no quarter has seen a higher number of candidates invited to apply for Canadian permanent residence than the second quarter of 2017. Along with this increase, the second quarter of 2017 also saw the number of Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) points required in order for a candidate to be issued an Invitation to Apply (ITA) reach a record new low.

In addition, the spring and early summer period were a time in which Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) created new opportunities for candidates in the Express Entry to be awarded additional points. IRCC also devised innovative new strategies to invite certain candidates through program-specific draws.

All of this activity followed a first quarter during which the number of ITAs being issued shot up, which in turn was a contributing factor to a decrease in the CRS cut-off threshold. One record-setting quarter has been followed by another, giving Express Entry candidates cause for optimism through the second half of the year and beyond.

April, May, and June a busy period

The 26,653 ITAs issued during the second quarter of 2017 was more than the 24,632 ITAs over the first quarter, and more than double the 13,202 issued over the course of the final three months of 2016.

The effect on CRS thresholds

There was nine Express Entry draws conducted over the second quarter of 2017, four of which set new record lows for the minimum CRS required.

As was the case in the early months of the year, the increase in ITAs from April through to June was a large contributing factor in the decrease in the CRS threshold. This threshold went down to as low as 413 on May 31 for candidates in the pool eligible under Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSWC) or Canadian Experience Class (CEC).

Just a few days previously, on May 26, IRCC performed two program-specific draws from the pool. The biggest beneficiaries on that occasion were candidates in the pool under the Federal Skilled Trades Class (FSWC) — FSWC candidates with CRS scores as low as 199 were invited to apply.

The graph below indicates draw the CRS cut-off thresholds over the course of 2017, with the second quarter highlighted.

What about candidates with lower scores?

Many candidates who entered the pool with CRS scores below the minimum drawn were able to raise their scores and obtain ITAs. This was shown over the course of 2016 when more than half (55 percent) of candidates who received an ITA had core CRS scores below 450 (the lowest score drew in 2016). Core CRS indicated a candidate’s score without the additional points for a provincial nomination, a job offer, or post-secondary education obtained in Canada.

Since 2016, new additional points factors have been introduced for candidates with a sibling in Canada and for candidates with French ability. With these new factors, the range of possible ways to increase one’s score has expanded.

The most valuable single factor under the CRS is a provincial nomination, which is worth 600 CRS points; therefore, a candidate with a CRS score of 200 would become a candidate with a score of 800 as soon as he or she obtains a provincial nomination. With this nomination, a candidate will receive an ITA at a subsequent draw from the pool.

Most Canadian provinces dedicate a portion of their Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs) to select candidates in the Express Entry pool. As we move deeper into 2017, provinces are coming up with pioneering new strategies to welcome newcomers from the Express Entry pool.

The provincial factor

As the federal government has made Express Entry the main driver of economic immigration to Canada, many provincial governments have made their ‘enhanced’ Express Entry-aligned PNP streams a significant driver of immigration to the provinces.

For example, over recent weeks and months the provinces of Ontario, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia (BC) have been particularly active with their enhanced PNP streams.

In Ontario, a new approach introduced in the final week of June allowed Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP) officials to search the Express Entry pool for candidates with experience in an Information Technology (IT) occupation, with a view of selecting applicants for the Express Entry-aligned OINP Human Capital Priorities stream. Candidates with experience in certain IT occupations were prioritized for selection, even if they scored less than 400 points under the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS). Normally, Ontario only invites candidates with 400 or more CRS points. This strategy may be repeated, either for IT professionals or with other candidates in mind.

In Nova Scotia, the Nova Scotia Demand: Express Entry stream reopened on July 5 for Express Entry candidates in one of 16 target occupations, including occupations in finance, health care, engineering, information technology, academia, social work, and law. The intake period closed within hours, showing not just the enduring popularity of this stream, but also the need for candidates to be prepared to apply at a moment’s notice as no prior warning is given for the stream reopening. No job offer is required for this stream.

As in the case of Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan’s International Skilled Worker – Express Entry sub-category also seeks out candidates in certain occupations, and no job offer is required for eligibility. In Saskatchewan’s case, 17 occupations are considered in demand (indeed, civil engineers are on both the Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia list). The mid-May intake period for the Saskatchewan program lasted just over a week, which was actually longer than many previous intake periods. This sub-category of the Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP) has opened three times so far this year and may do so again.

BC has also joined the ever-growing clutch of provinces looking for IT/tech professionals in the pool. The arrival of tech-only draws through the British Columbia Provincial Nominee Program (BC PNP), a new strategy for immigration to BC, was announced after six such draws had taken place from May through to July. BC also continues to invite workers and graduates in non-tech occupations.

What does the future hold?

It should be noted that the current record low CRS cut-off threshold of 413 came in the May 31 draw. That draw was then followed by four weeks without a draw, as IRCC implemented its new additional points factors and updated the pool accordingly. In many cases draws occur every two weeks, or even more often.

“Because of the four-week pause in draws, we never really got to see how low the CRS threshold may have gone if the usual two-to-three draws per month routine had continued without pause. During the pause new candidates joined the pool, some candidates got a boost in scores because of the new factors, and more candidates may have been able to upload a provincial nomination to their profile — all of which meant that the threshold increased temporarily before beginning to come down again,” notes Attorney David Cohen.

“It is also clear, however, that more provinces are engaging with Express Entry in innovative ways, and that draw sizes remain large. Moreover, with a high immigration target for next year and plenty of scope for IRCC to invite candidates through the second half of 2017, it is likely that candidates from different backgrounds and in a variety of occupations and scenarios will continue to benefit.”

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