Additional Foreigners required to deal with Teacher Shortage in Auckland

Additional Foreigners required to deal with Teacher Shortage in Auckland

Additional Foreigners required to deal with Teacher Shortage in Auckland

Additional Foreigners required to deal with Teacher Shortage in Auckland

The principals in Auckland who are facing a staffing crisis are seeking easier measures for foreigners to teach in the place. The Ministry of Education is stepping up to reorganize the process to recognize the qualifications for overseas-trained teachers.

Kevin Bush, President, Auckland Primary Principals’ Association said these intervention measures were the need of the day because there was a staffing crisis in Auckland and dearth of first-rate teachers.

The teachers of highest quality must be allowed in the country, and the process to make it happen must be streamlined.

At present, the foreign teachers face a long drawn and costly process to have recognition of their qualifications, he added.

The process involves cooperation with the New Zealand Qualifications Authority, the Education Council and Immigration authorities of New Zealand.

There are several stages involved in the recognition of their qualifications which take a long time. The delay in processing is a serious concern harming the arrival of their overseas colleagues to New Zealand. He estimated that teachers who were overseas-trained were only five percent of teaching staff in Auckland, and there was a place to absorb more of them.

Ellen MacGregor-Reid, Deputy Secretary, Education Ministry agreed that the present process meant for foreign teachers to live and work was difficult, and caused frustration, but some remedial measures were being taken. It needed an improvement she added.

The Ministry was working towards cooperation with NZQA, Education Payroll, and Education Council to have a refined approach, leading to reduced time and fewer costs.

The ongoing shortage of teachers in Auckland has encouraged the education groups to urge for increased pay, and for writing off of the student loans.

A plan based on 10-point was initiated by the NZEI Union, in association with, Principals Federation of New Zealand, and  Principals Association of Auckland and Waitakere Areas.

New Zealand Education Institute wants the Government to commence the implementation of the plan before the end of the 2017 academic year.

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New Zealand’s new PM to reduce immigration

New Zealand’s new PM to reduce immigration by only 30,000

New Zealand’s new PM to reduce immigration by only 30,000

New Zealand’s new PM to reduce immigration by only 30,000

Jacinda Ardern, New Zealand’s new Prime Minister, said their Labour Party will not reduce immigration to 10,000 as demanded by Winston Peters, New Zealand First leader, but would cut it only by about 30,000 from the present figure of about 73,000.

Ardern was quoted as saying in an interview with The Nation, which was broadcast on 20 October, that their party’s policy would not change because of their negotiations with Peters.

The impending reduction of immigration is one of the Labour Party’s policies that have begun worrying investors, besides increased social spending and central-bank reform are adding to their apprehensions about the economy slowing down. Ardern, who is another young leader like Emmanuel Macron, or Sebastian Kurz, will be the world’s youngest female to be anointed as leader of a country.

Ardern was supported by Peters to rule on 19 October following 12 days of negotiations, despite the fact the Labour Party, she heads, finished second in the 23 September election and the ruling National Party was not unable to get a majority.

Both Labour and New Zealand First parties’ campaign promises included cutting down immigration, which, according to them, had grown too fast, claiming that they had strained infrastructure, housing and public services.

Stating that some immigration was still necessary to plug skill shortages, Ardern said in the interview that there was unquestionably pressure based on the fact that the earlier government’s whole growth agenda was emphasizing too much on growth of population.

Ardern also said the loss of intensity was what she expected to see in the housing market as the new government led by her is pursuing boosting construction of homes, which would be cheaper and smaller.

Bill English, the former Prime Minister, faced flak from some voters for not being able to handle the spike in house prices, making them unaffordable for many nationals of New Zealand. It is said that home ownership was never so low since 1951.

Ardern said their government could ensure that they could make available affordable housing without paring much the value of existing homes of peoples.

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Age Definition of Dependent Children on Canadian Immigration Applications

Age Definition of Dependent Children on Canadian Immigration Applications to Increase

Age Definition of Dependent Children on Canadian Immigration Applications to Increase

Age Definition of Dependent Children on Canadian Immigration Applications to Increase

October 24, 2017 marks the day when the definition of dependent children on Canadian immigration applications Canada will increase to include children under 22 years of age. In May of this year, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) announced that eligible immigration applications received on or after October 24, 2017 will be processed based on the new definition. Therefore, immigration forms submitted on or after that date may include children of the principal applicants under the age of 22, who are not married or in a common-law relationship.

Previous regulations that came into effect in August, 2014 decreased the age definition of dependent children to under 19 years. The new regulatory change increases the maximum age of dependants to what it was prior to the change in 2014. The raising of the maximum age of dependent children does not apply retroactively to applications submitted after August 1, 2014 and before October 24, 2017.

IRCC explained the decision to withhold applying the new regulation on previously submitted immigration applications because, ‘applying the change to in-process applications would require a pause in finalizing many permanent residence applications and would impact processing times in many programs.’

An exception allows individuals aged 22 years and older, who rely on their parents financially due to a physical or mental health condition, the ability to be considered as dependants.

Changes that reflect socioeconomic trends

The decision to increase the age limit of dependent children demonstrates the government of Canada’s family reunification initiatives, as well as the impact of socioeconomic trends, which show that over recent years young adults are increasingly choosing to live with their parents.

Census data released in August, 2017 show that nearly 35 percent of young adults between 20 to 34 live with at least one parent, a figure that has been on the rise since 2001. More young adults may choose to live with their parents longer because of the logistical, emotional, or financial benefits to them while pursuing post-secondary studies or searching for full‑time employment. Other reasons may include cultural preferences of family members, or having a low income and a high the cost of living.

With the increase of the dependent children age limit, more immigrant children may stay with their parents during the adjustment period of applying for Canadian immigration, completing a Canadian education, and entering the Canadian labour market.

Federal Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen stated, “Raising the age of dependants lets more families stay together. This will bring economic and social gains to our country as it enhances our attractiveness as a destination of choice for immigrants and refugees.”

Many regulatory changes that came into effect since the Liberal government came to power in 2015 have placed an emphasis on family reunification. For example, some of the measures that came into force include the introduction of additional points under the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) for federal Express Entry candidates with a sibling in Canada, decreasing processing times and streamlining the application process for spousal and common-law partner sponsorship, and expanding the intake threshold for parent and grandparent sponsorship applications from 5,000 to 10,000.

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