What is an F1 Visa?

What is an F1 Visa?

What is an F1 Visa?

What is an F1 Visa?

An F1 visa is a nonimmigrant visa for those wishing to study in the U.S. You must file an F1 visa application if you plan on entering the US to attend a university or college, high school, private elementary school, seminary, conservatory, language training program, or other academic institution.

There are a few exceptions, but in general anyone who intends to stay in the USA to study or live must obtain either a temporary or immigrant visa by the US Department of State. If you wish to study in the USA you will most typically be issued a non-immigrant visa called an F1 (F2 for dependents) and can choose to attend one school types that are listed above

How Do You Get an F1 Visa?

The F1 visa process is relatively simple but can be time consuming, so it’s important to start this process as soon as possible to ensure that any delays won’t affect your education. Perhaps one of the lengthiest steps towards becoming an international student can be applying to a US school that has been approved by the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP). It’s also important to keep in mind that while there are many great institutions across the country, not all are equipped to handle international students and the administration that is required, so it’s important to verify that the school you would like to attend is approved well before filling out any applications, writing any essays or providing references.

After receiving acceptance by the school of your choice, you will be officially enrolled into the SEVP and are required to pay a one-time application fee. After all fees are paid and your account is in good standing, what is called an “I-20” form will be provided by your institution or educational program. This form will allow you to schedule an interview appointment with a local US embassy or consulate to be granted an F1 visa and officially become an international student!

F1 Visa Qualifications

Specific instructions for how to apply for your F1 visa will be listed on the website of the US embassy or consulate that you plan on visiting, but regardless of where your visa appointment may take place you will need to provide the same kind of documents and address the same kinds of questions.

In order to qualify and as part of the F1 visa interview process, potential international students will need to prove the following:

Official Residency in a Foreign Country and Intentions to Return Home

Upon graduation it’s imperative that the international student plans on returning back to their home country. If an interviewer can tell that your intentions are to become a permanent resident of the United States, your visa will more than likely be denied. The intention a student visa is to further educate yourself and then bring your newfound knowledge back to your country of citizenship, not to remain in the US.

Admission to an Approved School

During your interview it is also imperative that you can prove acceptance by a US institution or language school previously approved by the SEVP.

Sufficient Financial Support

F1 visa holders must be equipped to cover their living and study expenses while in the US, as legal employment opportunities will be limited.

Ties to Your Home Country

Another important part of an F1 visa interview is proving strong ties to your home country, including family, job offers, bank accounts or other assets.

Working on an F1 Visa

It’s essential to remember that F1 visas are intended for full-time students and are not designed as work visas. With this in mind, international students are typically able to work 20 hours a week on campus when school is in session and full-time while school is in recess, but you may need to seek approval from the Department of Homeland Security and the International Office at your school first. Working illegally while on an F1 visa is a serious violation of the regulations, and could result in deportation.

Additionally, F1 visa holders are eligible to apply for permission to work off campus for up to 12 months. This permission is called Optional Practical Training (OPT) and allows F1 students to train, and thus work, in a field that is related to their field of study. For more information, be sure to contact an international student advisor at your school, but OPT is traditionally used in the following situations:

  • Part-time work during the F-1 student’s studies,
  • Full-time work during periods of recess, or
  • After graduation in a field related to the program of study.

Transferring Schools with an F1 Visa

Students on an F1 visa are required to study at the academic institution through which their visa application was filed and granted. However, in some situations international students are able to transfer institutions if the student completes or leaves their current program with confirmed plans to study at a different US institution the following academic semester.

Returning Home

Students are not required to immediately return home upon completion of their program on an F1 visa. Instead, F-1 visa holders can remain in the US for up to 60 days after completing their academic program or OPT training. Any students wishing to remain in the States after their program must change their visa status, re-enroll in a higher program, or have the option to transfer to a new school and receive new visa documents.

If you have any questions about the visa process, an academic advisor at your school can often be a great resource. In terms of ensuring you have adequate health insurance for your studies in the United States, be sure to contact us for plan suggestions and guidance.

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Canadian citizenship applications surge after government relaxes language

Canadian citizenship applications surge after government relaxes language, residency rules

Canadian citizenship applications surge after government relaxes language, residency rules

Canadian citizenship applications surge after government relaxes language, residency rules

17,500 applications filed in week after requirements revised, compared with 3,653 in an average week

There was a spike in applications for Canadian citizenship after the government relaxed the rules around residency requirements and language proficiency this fall.

Figures from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship provided to CBC News show there was an average of 3,653 applications a week in the six months before changes were brought in Oct. 11.

The number shot up to 17,500 applications the week after the new requirements kicked in. There were 12,530 applications submitted the week after that, but data for subsequent weeks is not yet available.

“Reducing the physical presence requirement gives more flexibility to applicants to meet the requirements for citizenship and encourages more immigrants to take the path to citizenship,” said Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship spokeswoman Nancy Caron. “This helps individuals who have already begun building lives in Canada achieve citizenship faster.”

In recent years, there has been an average of 200,000 citizenship applications submitted each year.

Fluctuations in application rates are expected after rule changes, so the department put resources in place to handle “surge capacity” and keep processing times below the 12-month service standard, Caron said.

Andrew Griffith, a former senior immigration official, author and fellow of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, said it’s too early to tell if the jump in numbers represents a blip or part of a longer-term trend. But he believes an increased rate of citizenship fosters social cohesion and eases community tensions as immigrants have a deeper connection to the country and to Canadian society.

‘Integration journey’

“We want people to become citizens because we believe that’s part of the integration journey,” he said. “That helps them feel part of Canada and ultimately should improve all the economic, social and political outcomes of the country.”

The new rules include:

  1. The required length of physical presence in Canada is reduced to three out of five years, from four out of six years.
  2. A portion of time spent in Canada before permanent resident status will count toward residency requirements, which will give credit to temporary workers and students.
  3. The age range for language and knowledge requirements is reduced to 18 to 54 years old, from the previous requirement of 14 to 64.

But Griffith said high fees remain a barrier for some to apply for citizenship, especially those in the family reunification or refugee categories with stretched finances.

Processing fee hikes

The processing fee jumped to $630 in 2014-2015, which includes a $100 “right of citizenship” fee. That is still much lower than the fees in the U.K., the U.S. and the Netherlands, but is higher than New Zealand, Germany, Australia and France.

Griffith said reducing costs would reflect the fact that promoting citizenship provides not just personal benefit, but a benefit to the greater Canadian society when people can fully participate, including in the political process.

Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen, who marked the changes taking effect at an event in October, said they will make the path to join the “Canadian family” easier and more flexible.

“As a country that’s committed to the settlement and integration of newcomers successfully so they can restart their lives and make contributions to our society, we have to ensure the path to citizenship for permanent residents,” he said at the time.

People can be deemed ineligible for Canadian citizenship if they have a criminal record or are facing charges in or outside Canada, or if they have had citizenship refused or revoked in past.

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STATE NOMINATION FOR NORTHERN TERRITORY

STATE NOMINATION FOR NORTHERN TERRITORY

STATE NOMINATION FOR NORTHERN TERRITORY

STATE NOMINATION FOR NORTHERN TERRITORY

In the event that your occupation isn’t on the rundown however is on the Australian Government’s present rundown of qualified talented occupations you can in any case apply for NT Government selection.

You should give solid proof of good work prospects in the NT either in your occupation or a firmly related talented occupation.

You can indicate you have great work prospects by giving:

An articulation portraying how your abilities and experience meet NT manager needs

Evidence your occupation has been promoted in the NT different circumstances and clarification of how your capabilities and experience to coordinate the activity opening – you could give screen dumps of the activity adverts yet website page joins are not adequate

Feedback from potential NT businesses

An offer of business letter from a NT boss

Evidence of solid, settled family associations in the NT.

Responsibility of Australian Government (Northern Territory)

Australia’s Northern Territory (NT) Government decides if it will offer you a nomination. Your employment prospects in the NT and NT industry needs are important factors in the decision.

Occupations on the NT Migration Occupation List do not represent specific job vacancies.

A nomination from the NT Government is not a job guarantee. You will have to compete in the NT labour market and you will be responsible for finding your own employment and accommodation.

The NT Government provides information and some assistance to nominated skilled migrants. It does not provide an employment placement service or financial assistance.

Success in finding employment in the NT will depend on employer requirements, your qualifications, skills and experience and your level of English.

By applying for nomination you must acknowledge that the NT Government:

Nomination relates exclusively to the NT and does not apply outside of the NT

is not responsible for finding you employment, accommodation or providing financial assistance

is not liable for any inaccuracies or omissions in the information it provides you relating to your application, nor are its employees.

For occupations set apart with on the rundown, where there is an obligatory authorizing or enrollment necessity (set apart with a marks and shaded columns in the table), the candidate will be required to exhibit a level of English either adequate to meet permitting/enlistment or a base IELTS 6.0 score in each band or comparable, whichever is higher.

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