Immigration changes follow Labour policy

Immigration changes follow Labour policy

Immigration changes follow Labour policy

Immigration changes follow Labour policy

Labour and New Zealand First have agreed to take action on migrant and international student exploitation, but did not mention any immigration cut.

In the coalition agreement, the parties have agreed to follow Labour’s policy rather than New Zealand First’s.

Incoming Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern had earlier said Labour’s aim was to reduce net migration by 20,000 to 30,000 a year, while New Zealand First wanted to reduce net migration to 10,000.

“As per Labour’s policy, pursue Labour and New Zealand First’s shared priorities to: Ensure work visas issued reflect genuine skills shortages and cut down on low-quality international education courses,” the agreement said.

“The parties also agreed to take serious action on migrant exploitation, particularly of international students.”

No details were released on how that was to be achieved, any cut in numbers or from which visa categories.

Net migration in the year to September was about 70,000 but has slowed in the past few months.

Ardern had said that the three parties, the other being the Greens, shared a common view that increased immigration was putting pressure on infrastructure.

Massey University sociologist Paul Spoonley, an immigration expert, said the policy changes could tarnish New Zealand’s reputation overseas.

“The Government is going to have to manage how the international community views the downsizing of immigrant numbers,” Spoonley said.

“When we last decided there were too many immigrants – in 1996 – it took a couple of years to realise that the reputational damage and the reduced numbers both had negative effects on the economy. And we had changed our policy settings by 2000.”

Spoonley said the international education sector may be hard hit by the changes.

“International education is a particular focus for the new Government, both in terms of moving from the volume emphasised by the last Government and moving to focus on high value courses and students,” Spoonley said.

“Their own estimate suggests that this will mean a decline of $250 million out of the sector. But what will it do to the student accommodation market in the Auckland CBD?”

Spoonley said tougher transitioning from education to work and permanent residence might also make New Zealand a less attractive option for international students.

Given that approvals for those coming under the Skilled Migrant Category are the largest group of approvals, he said, a reduction by a third would also severely impact some employers.

June Ranson, chair of the New Zealand Association for Migration and Investment, said it would be difficult to comment until there was a clear understanding of where the reduced numbers of migrations were coming from.

However, she believed the new Labour-led coalition did not have a mandate for any immigration crackdown.

Ranson said the Greens electioneered on more of an open-door policy towards immigration and they did not agree to reduce migrant numbers.

“Does this mean the Greens have changed their mind as, based on the facts we have, there is no mandate in place,” she said.

Eric Chuah, founder of Cultural Connections and former head of migrant banking at ANZ, said cutting 30,000 net migration was a big call.

“It’s cutting the current net migration by 41 percent,” he said.

“The Government needs to think very clearly on the positive and negative impact of such drastic change.”

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Top Five Canadian Universities by Reputation Announced

Top Five Canadian Universities by Reputation Announced

Top Five Canadian Universities by Reputation Announced

Top Five Canadian Universities by Reputation Announced

Maclean’s, one of Canada’s popular news magazines, has published a new list of the top five Canadian universities by reputation. This year’s rankings represent post-secondary institutions from every region of the country. Can you guess which institution made first place?

  1. University of Alberta

The University of Alberta, founded in 1908, is located in Edmonton in the prairie province of Alberta. U of A is home to over 7,700 international students, with 400 international teaching and research agreements in 51 countries around the world. The university offers more than 200 undergraduate programs and 170 graduate programs. U of A is known worldwide for its engineering, science, and medicine programs, but also offers popular programs in law and education. U of A also ranks among the top 200 universities worldwide in this year’s Times Higher Education rankings, and it provides over 32,000 full-time students with excellent instruction, state-of-the-art facilities, well-funded programs, and world-renowned research opportunities with over $500 million in annual research funding.

  1. McGill University

As well as coming fourth by reputation, McGill is also named Canada’s top medical/doctoral university in 2018’s Maclean rankings. Roughly 26 percent of the student population in McGill is international, making it one of the most international universities in the country. This may be a result of the wide range of programs offered, which is located in the heart of lively, culturally diverse Montreal. The university welcomes students from all over the world with a continuous increase in international student enrolments every year.

McGill has become a center for research and instruction, known internationally for its top-tier medicine, engineering, and law programs. After all, this is where Canada’s 23rd and current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau obtained his undergraduate degree.

Signature programs: Medicine, Chemistry, Law, Music, Engineering, Management, Continuing Studies, Dentistry.

  1. University of British Columbia

UBC has over 60,000 students attending its two campuses located in Vancouver and Okanagan, 14,400 of whom are international students from 162 countries. With more than 200 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education programs, students enjoy a wide range of study options — no wonder it has the largest research libraries in the country. The university offers international students intensive and immersive English language education in its English Language Institute located in Vancouver.

Recent UBC statistics show the number of international students who attend the Vancouver campus increased by nine percent last year, with a 17 percent jump in Okanagan. In addition to top research facilities, UBC students can enjoy breathtaking views of the ocean, forests, and mountains, or visit some of the top city’s top attractions located in the university, such as the Museum of Anthropology, the UBC Botanical Garden, and the lush trails of Pacific Spirit Regional Park.

  1. University of Waterloo

The University of Waterloo hosts Velocity, the largest free startup incubator in the world. The University of Waterloo also ranks among the top comprehensive Canadian universities in Maclean’s 2018 rankings. The university gives business-minded students free access to resources that help them realize a project from an idea to a product and on to commercialization strategies. The university has the largest co-op program in the world, with more than 19,800 participating students, securing employment rates of 86 to 99.9 percent over recent years. The university’s co-op initiative attracts labour market involvement from over 6,700 employers. For students interested in securing employment after graduation, University of Waterloo boasts a program that sets students apart with a balanced academic experience and direct engagement with the industry. Its campuses are innovative and well-funded with a clear mission to become one of the world’s most pioneering learning destinations.

  1. University of Toronto

First place goes to U of T, which firmly holds its position as Canada’s most reputable university for consecutive years. Described as a “city within a city”, U of T has a large student population with almost 90,000 domestic and international students choosing to study in over 700 undergraduate and 300 graduate-level programs. The university has three campuses spread out in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), giving the opportunity to individuals in every part of the city to access the world-class education.

U of T attracts a multitude of international students; university statistics show the number of accepted admissions received from overseas increased by 20 percent in 2017. From artificial intelligence research to the development of cutting-edge tech ventures, such the launch of Creative Destruction labs, U of T research is often featured globally in headlines related to new discoveries and creative solutions. It comes as no surprise that U of T also earned this year’s title as Canada’s most innovative university in Reuters’ list of the Top 100 Most Innovative Universities in the world.

Learn more about your options for studying in Canada.

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Saskatchewan Express Entry Opens for 1,000 New Applications

Saskatchewan Express Entry Opens for 1,000 New Applications

Saskatchewan Express Entry Opens for 1,000 New Applications

Saskatchewan Express Entry Opens for 1,000 New Applications

The International Skilled Worker – Express Entry sub-category of the Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program (SINP) has reopened for 1,000 new applications, presenting an opportunity for eligible candidates in the government of Canada’s Express Entry immigration pool to apply for a provincial nomination without needing a job offer.

A successful application for a provincial nomination under the SINP International Skilled Worker – Express Entry sub-category, which operates on a first-come, first-served basis, results in 600 additional Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) points being awarded and an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residence being issued during a subsequent draw from the pool.

The last time this sub-category was in late July, when the intake of 600 new applications was filled within days — a common feature of this popular Canadian immigration category.

In-Demand Occupations

Of the 42 occupations on the new list, 19 do not require any professional licensure in order for a nomination to be issued.

No licensure required

NOC Occupation
0124 Advertising, marketing and public relations managers
0423 Managers in social, community and correctional services
1112 Financial and investment analysts
1122 Managers in Professional occupations in business management consulting
1123 Professional occupations in advertising, marketing, and public relations
2211 Chemical technologists and technicians
2212 Geological and mineral technologists and technicians
2121 Biologists and related scientists
2123 Agricultural representatives, consultants, and specialists
2225 Landscape and horticulture technicians and specialists
2241 Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and technicians
2242 Electronic service technicians (household and business equipment)
2243 Industrial instrument technicians and mechanics
2253 Drafting technologists and technicians
0811 Managers in natural resources production and fishing
0821 Managers in agriculture
0911 Manufacturing managers
0912 Utilities managers
2231 Civil engineering technologists and technicians

Professional licensure required

Saskatchewan requires certain applicants to have obtained professional licensure in order for the immigration application to be processed to completion. This process may be completed from outside Canada.

An application submitted by an individual in one of these occupations that does not include the appropriate proof of licensure may be held for processing until this is provided. All other required documentation must be included in the application, otherwise it will be returned to the applicant and the CAD $300 government processing fee may not be refunded.

NOC OCCUPATION NON-RESIDENT OF CANADA PATHWAY TO LICENCURE
0211 Engineering managers Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS)
2131 Civil engineers Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS)
2132 Mechanical engineers Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS)
2133 Electrical and electronics engineers Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS)
2141 Industrial and manufacturing engineers Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS)
2147 Computer engineers (except software engineers and designers) Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Saskatchewan (APEGS)
2151 Architects Refer to Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB) notes
2157 Land surveyors Canadian Board of Examiners for Professional Surveyors (CBEPS)
2154 Land surveyors Canadian Board of Examiners for Professional Surveyors (CBEPS)
2173 Software engineers and designers Canadian Association of Information Technology Professionals (CIPS)
2175 Web designers and developer Canadian Association of Information Technology Professionals (CIPS)
4151 Psychologists College of Psychologists
4212 Social and community service workers Canadian Association of Social Workers
4214 Early childhood educators and assistants Canadian Association of Social Workers
3211 Medical laboratory technologists Saskatchewan Society of Medical Laboratory Technologists
3216 Medical sonographers Sonography Canada
6331 Meat cutters Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC)
7231 Machinists Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC)
7272 Cabinetmakers Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC)
7311 Industrial mechanics Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC)
7312 Heavy-duty equipment mechanics Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC)
7321 Automotive service technicians, truck and bus mechanics Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC)
7322 Motor vehicle body repairers Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC)
7237 Welders Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC

 Minimum Eligibility Requirements

In order to be eligible for the SINP’s International Skilled Worker – Saskatchewan Express Entry sub-category, candidates must:

Have proof of legal status, if currently residing in Canada;

Have an Express Entry Profile Number and Job Seeker Validation Code;

Score a minimum of 60 points out of 100 on the SINP point assessment grid.

Provide language test results from a designated testing agency that match the language level declared in the Express Entry profile;

Have completed at least one year of post-secondary education or training which is comparable to the Canadian education system and which has resulted in a degree, diploma, or certificate;

Have a minimum level of work experience related to their field of education or training in a highly skilled occupation (NOC 0, A, or B) that is considered to be in-demand in Saskatchewan (See in-demand occupations list above);

Have at least one of the following in the field of education or training occupation:

One year work experience in the past 10 years in a skilled profession (non-trades),

Two years work experience in a skilled trade in the past five years; or

Twelve months work experience in Canada in the past three years (trades and non-trades).

Obtain proof of eligibility for Saskatchewan licensure if their profession is regulated in Saskatchewan and requires mandatory (compulsory) certification or licensing; and

Have proof of sufficient settlement funds and a settlement plan.

“Intake periods under this SINP Express Entry sub-category are typically short, usually filling within days, and the government of Saskatchewan does not give any prior warning as to when the sub-category may reopen,” notes Attorney David Cohen.

“As such, the first-come, first-served system rewards individuals who have prepared in advance and who are following Provincial Nominee Program updates regularly, as these are the people best placed to submit an application when the SINP opens its doors to Express Entry skilled workers.”

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