Tourist Visa Consultants Agents for Australia Tourist Visa USA UK Tourist Visa

Tourist Visa and Transit visa for Australia

When we need a tourist visa and transit visa for Australia and what documents to be attached with the application is a complicated process for the first-timers and if the application is rejected due to some information missing or the embassy says tourist visa application rejected without any reason will be a disaster for the people visiting Australia for some urgent purposes. We will guide you to get a tourist visa without any fail.

Tourist visa and transit visa for the USA

Getting a USA tourist visa or transit visa is one of the most stressful tasks for many people since most cases are rejected by the USA authorities for simple reasons. How to attend the interview and how to get the tourist visa will be taught by our experts while on counseling, which is offered free.

Tourist visa for Germany and European countries

Tourist visas are issued by a common authority and it is called Schengen visa for all the countries membered in the European Union. We help to get the visa for the purpose of searching for jobs in the countries and there is one condition you should not work for money during the visa period.

Tourist visa for the United Kingdom

Tourists to visit places and to visit relatives, as well as job seekers, can apply for the visa and enjoy the benefits of other purposes also. Kindly visit our office we will help you to get the visa without any fail.

Our Services on the visa and immigration front given below

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Posted in Australia, Australian Spouse visa, British Columbia, Canada, Child Visa, Europe, family visa, Germany, Germany Job Seeker Visa, Immigration, Ireland, New Zealand, Parent Visa, Parents and Grandparents sponsorship program, Refusal visa, Saskatchewan, Tourist Visa, USA, Visa and Immigration, Western Australia | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Canada Educational Credential Assessment finding Equal degree

Canada Educational Credential Assessment (ECA)

Educational Credential Assessment

Canada Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) is a document that verifies the Canadian equivalence of a foreign degree, diploma, certificate, or other proof of education credential.

The Canada ECA report states whether an individual’s educational credential is equivalent to Canadian standards, and is valid for the purposes of Canadian immigration. If the ECA report states that the foreign educational credential is equivalent, the individual may include the information in his or her Express Entry profile.

Who needs a Canada ECA?

Candidates who wish to be considered under the Federal Skilled Worker Class are required to have a Canada ECA before entering the Express Entry pool unless their educational credential was obtained from an institution in Canada.

Candidates who wish to be considered under the Federal Skilled Trades Class or Canadian Experience Class are not required to obtain an ECA. However, if they wish to obtain points for their foreign educational credentials under the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS), an ECA is required. A higher CRS score is likely to increase an individual’s chances of being drawn from the pool.

The spouse or common-law partner of a candidate for any of the programs managed under the Express Entry system must also obtain an ECA for his or her foreign education if he or she wishes to claim CRS points. An ECA is not required for an accompanying spouse or partner, however, no points may be awarded without presenting an ECA.

A candidate and his or her spouse/partner (if applicable) must obtain an ECA for each credential for which he or she wishes to claim points. For example, if a candidate has completed high school, a Bachelor degree, and a graduate diploma, he or she may obtain more points under the CRS if he or she obtains an ECA for the Bachelor and the graduate diploma than if he or she had only the Bachelor degree assessed.

Obtaining a Canada ECA

In order to obtain a Canada ECA report, a candidate (and his or her accompanying spouse or partner, if applicable) submits the required documents to an organization designated by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). These organizations operate independently of the government of Canada. Required documents may include transcripts and certificates.

The current organizations designated by IRCC to issue ECA reports are:

  • World Education Services (Date Designated: April 17, 2013)
  • Comparative Education Service – University of Toronto School of Continuing Studies (Date Designated: April 17, 2013)
  • International Credential Assessment Service of Canada (Date Designated: April 17, 2013)
  • International Qualifications Assessment Service (Date Designated: August 6, 2015)
  • International Credential Evaluation Service (Date Designated: August 6, 2015)
  • Medical Council of Canada (the professional body for Doctors) (Date Designated: April 17, 2013)
  • Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada (the professional body for Pharmacists) (Date Designated: January 6, 2014)

The ECA must be issued on or after the date that IRCC designated the service. In addition, the ECA must not be more than five years old on the date that IRCC receives the candidate’s Express Entry profile and application for permanent residence.

It is important to note that an ECA is not proof of accreditation or a license in a regulated profession. Professional accreditation is separate from the ECA process and is decided by regulatory authorities in each province. Find out more about Canadian Foreign Credential Assessment Services.

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Posted in Canada, Canada PNP, Child Visa, Denmark, Dependent Visa, Express Entry, family visa, Germany Job Seeker Visa, Greece, Immigration, Manitoba, New Zealand, Norway Job Seeker Visa, Parents and Grandparents sponsorship program, Quebec, Refusal visa, Schengen Visa, Switzerland, Toronto, Tourist Visa, UK, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Canada Express Entry Draw issued 3600 ITA’s for Canada PR on September 18th

Canada Express Entry Draw issued 3600 ITA’s for Canada PR on September 18th

Canada Express Entry

Canada Express Entry

Canada has already given 63,400 Express Entry Candidates to apply for Permanent Residence in 2019

Another Express Entry draw held on yesterday has welcomed 3,600 possibilities to apply for Canadian PR.

The required Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score in the present draw was 462. This is one point lower than the past draw, which was held on September 4th and had a cut-off score of 463.

The Express Entry system deals with the pool of possibilities for Canada’s three Federal High Skilled Economic Immigration Categories — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, Federal Skilled Trades Class, and Canadian Express Entry.

Qualified applicants are positioned in the pool according to their CRS score, which depends on components, like age, education, work experience and capability in English or French, among different factors.

A set of the highest-ranked candidates are invited to apply through draws from the pool, which are ordinarily held every 15 days.

The September 18 welcome round carries the total number of ITA’s issued for the current year to 63,400.

IRCC had issued 58,600 ITAs by this equivalent point in 2018 and completed that year with the current ITA record of 89,800.

For 2019 Canada plans 81400 Invitations for three high skilled categories named Canadian Express Entry, Federal Skilled Worker Class, and Federal Skilled Trades Class. And for 2020 Canada expected to invite 85,800 Qualified Candidates for the Canada Express Entry Visa Program.

The reality the score dropped one point might be expected to IRCC keeping up fourteen days between the present draw and the past Draw on September 4.

Applicants with scores below yesterday cut-off who need to improve their positioning have various options, the most significant being a Provincial Nominee Program stream.

A Provincial Nomination through one of these Express Entry-streams brings about an extra 600 CRS Points and adequately ensures an ITA in a consequent Express Entry draw.

A few of these Nomination streams don’t require a base CRS score so as to be qualified, while others have CRS prerequisites that are well beneath the present cut-off score.

Posted in Canada, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Visa and Immigration | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Over 5 lakh Indians are visited the UK in 12 months since July 2018

Over five lakh Indians are visited the UK in twelve months since July 2018

Over 5 lakh Indians are visited the UK in 12 months since July 2018

Over 5 lakh Indians are visited the UK in 12 months since July 2018

More than 5 lakh Indians have visited the UK in a year since July 2018

In excess of 5 Lakh Indians visited the United Kingdom in a very year since July 2018, AN eleven percent expansion over the past a year, according to reports discharged by the UK’s Office for National Statistics. The British High Commissioner to India Dominic Asquith alluded to as it “incredible news” for the UK-India relationship.

“It seems like the number of Indian fans that made a trip to the United Kingdom for the Cricket World Cup in England and Wales was much bigger than we keep an eye on notional,” he stated, reacting to the report.

The report printed quarterly by the UK’s work environment for National Statistics, said the quantity of Indians discovering inside the UK has about multiplied in three years and is at present at the best levels since 2011, it said.

The report demonstrates that more than 5,03,000 Indians got Visitor visas between July 2018 to June 2019.

“This was an eleven percent expansion contrasted with the earlier year,” the report said.

The report said that Indian and Chinese nationals along represented almost 50% of all Visitor visas allowed.”Notwithstanding the explorer visas, about 22,000 Indian nationals got a Tier four study visa for the year finishing June 2019 – up from near 15,000 the earlier year,” the report said.

The report additionally said that Indian nationals still get a ton of experienced work visas than the rest of the world joined, representing fifty-two percent of all Tier 2 visas conceded all around.

“In excess of 56,000 Indians got gifted work visas – a five percent expansion contrasted with the earlier year, that is moreover the most significant increment for any nation,” the report said.

“Part of Indians visit, the more grounded the living scaffold moves toward becoming between our 2 nations. I foresee to working with our accomplices in India to ensure this terrific record proceeds,” he said in an announcement.

Posted in Study Abroad, Tourist Visa, UK, Visa and Immigration, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Setting the record straight on the benefits, and heavy costs, of immigration to Canada

Setting the record straight on the benefits, and heavy costs, of immigration to Canada

Setting the record straight on the benefits, and heavy costs, of immigration to Canada

Setting the record straight on the benefits, and heavy costs, of immigration to Canada

Setting the record straight on the benefits, and heavy costs, of immigration to Canada

The average recent immigrant in Canada imposes a fiscal burden of $5,300 annually

In a recent campaign speech, Maxime Bernier, leader of the People’s Party of Canada, cited the results of one of our studies, which showed that recent immigrants are imposing a heavy fiscal burden on Canadians. He used this information to justify his plan to reduce future levels of immigration.

The CBC had journalist Jonathon Gatehouse do a “fact check” of Bernier’s claim about the fiscal burden. In a publication sponsored by the CBC, he concludes that this claim is “false.” Since this verdict implies that our study also reached false conclusions, we feel compelled to do our own fact check of the analysis produced by Gatehouse.

The author makes much of the well-known fact that immigrants have a positive effect on aggregate national income (GDP), which says nothing about the fiscal burden. He also fails to note that recent immigrants have lowered Canada’s per capita income since, according to official statistics, they have lower average incomes than other Canadians.

He also cites a number of published studies and data he considers relevant. They involve well-known facts and again tell us nothing about the fiscal burden. For example, he notes that the gap in the unemployment rate between recent immigrants and native-born Canadian males has narrowed, but neglects to mention that this always happens when an economic boom creates increased demand for labour and leads to the hiring of previously unemployable workers.

Another statistic Gatehouse cited is that the wages received by immigrants who entered the labour market in 2017 were the highest ever. These wages have indeed been increasing every year, along with the wages of all new labour force entrants. The fact that the average incomes of immigrants who arrived in 2006 increased consistently over the following 10 years simply reflects the normal increase in incomes of all workers through time due to increased skills and work experience. As working immigrants go through this cycle, their average income rises relative to the average income of Canadians of all ages.

Estimating the fiscal burden immigrants impose on Canadians requires data on the average taxes paid and government benefits received by immigrants. Data from the 2016 Census also cited by Gatehouse shows that the average income of recent immigrants aged 25-54 continues to fall short of that of non-immigrants, which means they continue to pay less in taxes on average.

In our most recent study we used basic statistics from the previous census and the National Household Survey to estimate that because of Canada’s progressive income tax system, recent immigrants paid much lower income taxes than non-immigrants. We added to this amount other taxes related to income and wealth, such as the GST and capital gains taxes, and concluded that in 2008-09, recent immigrants on average paid $13,100 in tax compared with $18,000 paid by other Canadians, yielding a shortfall of $4,900 per year.

The government publishes statistics on how much it spends to provide different types of benefits. In the absence of all the required information, we assumed that immigrants received the same benefits on average as did other Canadians. This assumption seems reasonable since nearly all spending was on universal health care, social insurance, education, security and conservation of the environment.

In response to criticism, we estimated that with their lower incomes immigrants benefit less from government spending on protection but, because they have more children on average, benefit more from spending on education. The net effect of these adjustments is that immigrants on average receive $414 more than non-immigrants in benefits.

Gatehouse noted that in our study we had not taken account of welfare and other social benefits received by immigrants, which some believe to be excessive and others believe to be less than what non-immigrants receive. We deliberately avoided this controversial issue and assumed simply that both groups received the same average amount of such benefits. The greatest differences between recent immigrants and others are on the tax, not the spending side of the government accounts.

When we combined our estimates of taxes paid and benefits received we found that the average recent immigrant in Canada imposes a fiscal burden of $5,300 annually.

According to government statistics, in 2010 the number of recent immigrants (since 1985) was about 3.7 million. Multiplying this number by $5,300 brings the estimated fiscal burden that year to $20 billion. Since then the stock of immigrants has increased by 250,000 a year and raised the annual fiscal burden in 2018 to over $30 billion.

Canada needs a full discussion of its immigration policy that considers both its benefits, which are discussed by politicians and the media all the time, but also its very real costs, which involve not just the fiscal burden but also traffic congestion, overcrowding of hospitals, schools and recreational facilities, deteriorating environment and lack of affordable housing, which governments cannot address in part because of the fiscal burden. A lot of roads, affordable housing and cleaner environment could be purchased with that $30 billion.

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Indian students set to benefit from UK’s 2-year post-study work visa offer

Indian students set to benefit from UK’s 2-year post-study work visa offer

Indian students set to benefit from UK's 2-year post-study work visa offer

Indian students set to benefit from UK’s 2-year post-study work visa offer

Indian students set to benefit from UK’s 2-year post-study work visa offer

In a move that addresses a long-standing demand to boost Indian student numbers choosing British universities, the UK government on Wednesday announced a new two-year post-study work visa route for all international students.

The new ‘Graduate’ route, to be in place by next year, will be open to all overseas nationals who have valid UK immigration status as a student and have successfully completed a course of study in any subject at undergraduate level or above at a government-approved UK higher education institution.

The visa will allow eligible students to work, or crucially look for work, in any career or position of their choice, for two years after completing their studies.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who has effectively re-instated a policy ended by his predecessor Theresa May around nine years ago, said the change would see students “unlock their potential” to begin careers in the UK.

“The new Graduate Route will mean talented international students, whether in science and maths or technology and engineering, can study in the UK and then gain valuable work experience as they go on to build successful careers,” said UK home secretary Priti Patel, the senior-most Indian-origin member of Johnson’s Cabinet.

“It demonstrates our global outlook and will ensure that we continue to attract the best and brightest,” she said.

The UK ended its two-year post-study work visa offer during May’s term as UK home secretary in 2012, widely seen as responsible for a major drop in student numbers from countries like India.

“The withdrawal of the PSW [post-study work] visa was attributed with a decline in international student recruitment in the UK from key markets, notably India. Between 2010-11 and 2016-17, the number of higher education students from India more than halved,” noted a report by the UK’s All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for International Students.

The government’s latest announcement was widely welcomed by university chiefs and representatives, who highlight that Indian students were particularly prone to make their higher education choices based on being able to gain some work experience at the end of their degree.

“Although 82 percent of our Indian graduates are satisfied with their careers wherever they are working, we know that they value the opportunity to spend some time in the UK working after their degree. This visa will make it significantly easier for them to do that,” said Vivienne Stern, Director, and Universities UK International, which has been lobbying for such a visa for many years.

“The UK ranks first for international student satisfaction overall, compared to other major study destinations, but having a more attractive post-study work offer will open the UK up to even more international students. It will also allow employers in all parts of the UK to benefit from access to talented graduates from around the world,” she said.

Indian students coming to the UK registered a hike over the last three years, hitting around 22,000 in the year ending June 2018. This was a 42 percent increase on the previous year, a reversal from a downward trend in the past.

“I’m delighted that the numbers of Indian students coming to study in the UK are constantly increasing, having doubled over the last three years. Last year alone we saw a massive 42 percent increase. This exciting announcement will help ensure that the UK remains one of the best destinations for students across the world,” said Sir Dominic Asquith, British High Commissioner to India.

The latest announcement follows the creation of a new fast-track visa route for scientists and the removal of the limit on Ph.D. students moving into the skilled work visa route, which collectively aims to cement the UK as a science superpower and a world-leader in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) sector.

According to official UK figures, almost half of all Indian students – 130,000 since 2008-9 – heading to the UK in the last 10 years chose a STEM subject.

The new Graduate route will launch for the 2020-21 intake of students to UK universities.

After the two years, they will be able to switch onto the skilled work visa if they find a job which meets the skill requirement of the route.

The new visa, more details of which will be unveiled in the coming months, will offer opportunities to work or look for work after graduating. However, unlike the route which closed in 2012, the UK government stressed that the new route will also include safeguards to ensure only “genuine, credible students” is eligible.

The announcement coincides with the launch of a 200-million pound genetics project at the UK Biobank, a charity and health resource that contains information and samples from 500,000 people.

Posted in Europe, Study Abroad, UK, Uncategorized, Work Abroad | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Canada issued 3,600 invitations to apply for PR in new Express Entry draw

Canada issued 3,600 invitations to apply for PR in new Express Entry draw

Canada issued 3,600 invitations to apply for PR in new Express Entry draw

Canada issued 3,600 invitations to apply for PR in new Express Entry draw

Canada issued 3,600 invitations to apply for permanent residence in new Express Entry draw

Canada has now invited 59,800 Express Entry candidates to apply this year

Invitations to apply for Canadian permanent residence have been issued to 3,600 Express Entry candidates in a new draw held by the Government of Canada on September 4.

The minimum Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score was 463, an increase of six points over the previous draw on August 20.

The Express Entry system is Canada’s principal source of skilled foreign workers. It manages the profiles of candidates for Canada’s three Federal High Skilled economic class immigration programs — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, Federal Skilled Trades Class, and Canadian Experience Class.

Eligible candidates are entered into the Express Entry pool and are ranked based on a CRS score that considers factors such as age, education, skilled work experience and proficiency in English or French.

A set number of the highest-ranked candidates are issued an invitation to apply for Canadian permanent residence (ITA) through regular draws from the Express Entry pool.

Today’s draw is the 17th of 2019 and brings the total number of ITAs issued this year to 59,800.

In 2018, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) issued a record 89,800 ITAs, a number that it could surpass this year given Canada’s higher admissions targets for both 2019 and 2020 under the three Federal High Skilled immigration programs.

Fluctuation in the minimum CRS scores drawn this year may be partly attributed to the time between draws, which has deviated on a number of occasions from IRCC’s usual pace of a draw every two weeks.

More time between draws allows the pool to replenish with higher-scoring candidates, which can have the effect of raising the minimum CRS score.

Less time between draws means fewer candidates have time to enter a profile, which can help to lower the cut-off score.

This was the case with the August 20 draw, which took place only eight days after the previous draw on August 12 and saw the minimum CRS score decrease by nine points, from 466 to 457.

Today’s draw comes 15 days after the August 20 draw and resulted in an increase of six points.

Express Entry candidates with scores below today’s CRS cut-off have a variety of potential options for increasing their points total, the most valuable of which is a provincial nomination.

A provincial nomination results in an additional 600 CRS points and effectively guarantees an invitation to apply for Canadian permanent residence.

Since the previous draw on August 20, several of Canada’s Express Entry-aligned provincial nomination streams have issued invitations, including streams in Alberta, Nova Scotia, and British Columbia.

Canada’s various provincial nomination streams have held an estimated 170 draws since the start of 2019 — ten times more than the 17 Express Entry invitation rounds held this year.

The following are hypothetical examples of Express Entry candidates who would have obtained an ITA in the September 4 draw:

Ajay is 32, holds a master’s degree and has an advanced English language proficiency. He has been working as a database architect for three years. While Ajay has never worked or studied in Canada, his CRS score of 465 would have been sufficient to obtain an ITA during the September 4 Express Entry draw.

Nour and Anthony are married, are 33 and 38 respectively, and each holds a bachelor’s degree. Nour has advanced French language proficiency and intermediate English language proficiency. Nour has been working as a restaurant manager for five years. Anthony has an advanced English language proficiency but does not speak French. Neither Nour or Anthony have ever studied in Canada. They entered the Express Entry pool with Nour as the principal applicant and Nour’s CRS score of 465 would have been high enough to obtain an ITA in today’s Express Entry draw.

IRCC has now held three draws in less than a month and we’ve seen a lot of activity with Express Entry-linked PNPs during this same period,” said David Cohen, senior partner with the Campbell, Cohen Canadian immigration law firm.

“With the number of ITAs issued this year still ahead of last year’s record pace, we should be in for an exciting fall.”

Posted in Canada, Canada PNP, Express Entry, Immigration, Visa and Immigration | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Canada wants to diversify international student intake

Canada wants to diversify international student intake

Canada wants to diversify international student intake

Canada wants to diversify international student intake

Canada wants to diversify international student intake

Federal government unveils its five-year international education strategy

Canada’s new five-year international education strategy is calling for greater diversity, innovation and global ties.

The federal government’s strategy, released this week, recognizes the strong presence of international students in Canada, noting that 570,000 foreign study permit holders contributed over $21 billion to the Canadian economy since the start of 2019.

A key aim of the new $148-million strategy is to increase the variety of source countries for international students. It has pledged almost $30 million to diversify recruitment efforts in this domain.

As is, more than 50 percent of Canada’s international students come from China and India, and they are concentrated in large cities such as Calgary, Toronto and Vancouver. The strategy’s expanded recruitment efforts will target Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, Vietnam, the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand, Morocco, Turkey, France, and Ukraine.

The strategy also aims to diversify where international students study in Canada, thus bringing foreign talent to locations that usually receive fewer immigrants than large urban centres.

Canada offers world-renowned universities such as McGill, in Montreal, and the University of Toronto, both of which are popular with international students. Smaller universities such as the University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta, or Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, B.C., may also be an attractive option to those looking for a more intimate post-secondary experience.

The Minister of International Trade Diversification, James Carr, said international students stimulate innovation and develop cross-cultural competencies.

“If [students from abroad] choose to immigrate to Canada, they contribute to Canada’s economic success,” Carr said in a statement. “Those who choose to return to their countries become life-long ambassadors for Canada and for Canadian values.”

Another element of Canada’s international education strategy is an investment of nearly $100 million in Canadians studying overseas, focusing on groups that historically have been denied such opportunities such as Indigenous people, low-income and people with disabilities.

Canada’s Minister of Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship, Ahmed Hussen, said that international students are “often ideal candidates for permanent residency,” in a statement from the International Education Strategy.

“The strategy builds on the attributes that have made Canada a destination of choice for international students: strong schools and programs of study in both English and French; welcoming and diverse communities with an enviable quality of life, and opportunities to start careers and pursue permanent residency,” Hussen said.

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Canada Provinces held nearly 10 times as many draws as Express Entry

Canada Provinces held nearly 10 times as many draws as Express Entry

Canada Provinces held nearly 10 times as many draws as Express Entry

Canada Provinces held nearly 10 times as many draws as Express Entry

Canada’s provinces have held nearly 10 times as many draws as Express Entry this year

Provincial nominee programs offer more opportunities to a wider range of immigration candidates

There might be easier options than Express Entry for achieving your goal of Canadian permanent residence.

The Express Entry system is Canada’s main source of skilled foreign workers, managing the profiles of candidates for the Federal Skilled Worker Class, Federal Skilled Trades Class, and Canadian Experience Class.

Candidates in the Express Entry pool are ranked according to a score awarded under the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS), which considers factors such as age, education, skilled work experience and proficiency in English or French, and a set number of the highest-ranked candidates in the pool are issued invitations to apply for Canadian permanent residence (ITAs) through regular draws.

The minimum CRS scores required to receive an ITA this year have ranged from 438 to 470. A look at the composition of the Express Entry pool as of August 15, 2019, shows that only around 13 percent of Express Entry candidates had CRS scores in this range.

More than 160 provincial draws so far in 2019

For the vast majority of candidates whose scores are below those being drawn, or who do not have an Express Entry profile, there are numerous provincial immigration streams that have been extremely active in 2019.

These streams are connected to Canada’s Provincial Nominee Program, or PNP, which allows participating provinces and territories to nominate a set number of immigration candidates for Canadian permanent residence who have talent that is missing from their labour markets.

Since January, there have been more than 160 draws conducted through provincial streams compared to the 17 Express Entry invitation rounds held this year.

“If you have a score that’s below those being drawn through Express Entry, there are still many other potential opportunities,” said David Cohen, senior partner with the Campbell, Cohen Canadian immigration law firm in Montreal. “Even if you’re not able to get into the pool, base nomination streams can provide a pathway to permanent residence.”

Low or no CRS score required

There are two types of provincial nomination streams:

  • Enhanced nomination streams, which are linked to Express Entry
  • Base nomination streams, which are not linked with Express Entry

All nine provinces and two territories that take part in the PNP have enhanced nomination streams linked to the Express Entry system.

Many of these streams hold their own draws that often have minimum CRS scores that are lower than Express Entry draws. For example, the Province of Alberta has invited candidates with CRS scores as low as 300 this year.

Other provinces, such as Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia, have enhanced nomination streams that do not consider a candidate’s CRS score.

Candidates who are selected through enhanced nomination streams are invited to apply for a provincial nomination. If they are successful, they receive an additional 600 points towards their Express Entry CRS score and are effectively guaranteed an invitation to apply for Canadian permanent residence.

Provinces also have their own “base” nomination streams that are not aligned with Express Entry. These can provide individuals who may not be eligible for Express Entry but have skills or education that are required by a given province with a pathway to Canadian permanent residence.

Many provinces have base streams that value specific qualifications or occupations (e.g., physicians, daycare workers, or long-haul truck drivers).

Other base streams are suited for those who have spent time in the province as a student or visitor or have a family or friend connection.

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New Rulemaking Brings Significant Changes to EB-5 Visa Program

New Rulemaking Brings Significant Changes to EB-5 Visa Program

New Rulemaking Brings Significant Changes to EB-5 Visa Program

New Rulemaking Brings Significant Changes to EB-5 Visa Program

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will publish a final rule on July 24 that makes a number of significant changes to its EB-5 Immigrant Investor Visa Program, marking the first significant revision of the program’s regulations since 1993. The final rule will become effective on Nov. 21, 2019.

New developments under the final rule include:

  • Raising the minimum investment amounts;
  • Revising the standards for certain targeted employment area (TEA) designations;
  • Giving the agency responsible for directly managing TEA designations;
  • Clarifying USCIS procedures for the removal of conditions on permanent residence; and
  • Allowing EB-5 petitioners to retain their priority date under certain circumstances.

Under the EB-5 program, individuals are eligible to apply for conditional lawful permanent residence in the United States if they make the necessary investment in a commercial enterprise in the United States and create or, in certain circumstances, preserve 10 permanent full-time jobs for qualified U.S. workers.

“Nearly 30 years ago, Congress created the EB-5 program to benefit U.S. workers, boost the economy, and aid distressed communities by providing an incentive for foreign capital investment in the United States,” said USCIS Acting Director Ken Cuccinelli. “Since its inception, the EB-5 program has drifted away from Congress’s intent. Our reforms increase the investment level to account for inflation over the past three decades and substantially restrict the possibility of gerrymandering to ensure that the reduced investment amount is reserved for rural and high-unemployment areas most in need. This final rule strengthens the EB-5 program by returning it to its Congressional intent.”

Major changes to EB-5 in the final rule include:

Raising minimum investment amounts: As of the effective date of the final rule, the standard minimum investment level will increase from $1 million to $1.8 million, the first increase since 1990, to account for inflation. The rule also keeps the 50% minimum investment differential between a TEA and a non-TEA, thereby increasing the minimum investment amount in a TEA from $500,000 to $900,000. The final rule also provides that the minimum investment amounts will automatically adjust for inflation every five years.

TEA designation reforms: The final rule outlines changes to the EB-5 program to address gerrymandering of high-unemployment areas (which means deliberately manipulating the boundaries of an electoral constituency). Gerrymandering of such areas was typically accomplished by combining a series of census tracts to link a prosperous project location to a distressed community to obtain the qualifying average unemployment rate. As of the effective date of the final rule, DHS will eliminate a state’s ability to designate certain geographic and political subdivisions as high-unemployment areas; instead, DHS would make such designations directly based on revised requirements in the regulation limiting the composition of census tract-based TEAs. These revisions will help ensure TEA designations are done fairly and consistently, and more closely adhere to congressional intent to direct investment to areas most in need.

Clarifying USCIS procedures for removing conditions on the permanent residence: The rule revises regulations to make clear that certain derivative family members who are lawful permanent residents must independently file to remove conditions on their permanent residence. The requirement would not apply to those family members who were included in a principal investor’s petition to remove conditions. The rule improves the adjudication process for removing conditions by providing flexibility in interview locations and to adopt the current USCIS process for issuing Green Cards.

Allowing EB-5 petitioners to keep their priority date: The final rule also offers greater flexibility to immigrant investors who have a previously approved EB-5 immigrant petition. When they need to file a new EB-5 petition, they generally now will be able to retain the priority date of the previously approved petition, subject to certain exceptions.

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